Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 1234»»»

SCOME - Centralize Monitoring with ASP.NET - Part 1 Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Sunday, April 19, 2009 11:10 PM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, January 12, 2014 9:26 PM
Points: 68, Visits: 172
Comments posted to this topic are about the item SCOME - Centralize Monitoring with ASP.NET - Part 1
Post #700386
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 1:48 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 2:22 AM
Points: 22, Visits: 292
I like your article. Seems interesting, and also a good idea. However, a several drawbacks could be:
1. getting that "own SQL Server "SQL_Admin"" might be a bit hard
2. how many DBAs are actually savvy .NET coders?
3. creating how MANY linked servers

Here are several topics that might bring us to a better solution:

1. SSIS works quite well for monitoring SQL Servers on the network
2. SSRS can give you the opportunity to code your own report as needed. (You can actually drown in the amount of functionality which SSIS and SSRS provide!)

Another thing: a few months back I started working as a DBA at a company, where my main task was to monitor and maintain 41 servers (development, testing, production, clusters). On that Monday morning at 9 am - my first day at work - my first self-initiated task was to setup the "Central Management Server" in SQL2008. I used this to manually overview the other 40 server for about a week until I built a SSIS package to monitor the system automatically.




Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler.
Albert Einstein
Post #700415
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 2:30 AM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, January 12, 2014 9:26 PM
Points: 68, Visits: 172
sibir1us (4/20/2009)
I like your article. Seems interesting, and also a good idea. However, a several drawbacks could be:
1. getting that "own SQL Server "SQL_Admin"" might be a bit hard
2. how many DBAs are actually savvy .NET coders?
3. creating how MANY linked servers


Hi, thanks sibir1us. I agree getting your own server may not be easy but it's not a must, you could use an existing one. The procs aren't resource hungry at all.

Hey, you don't need to be .Net savvy as these articles will be step by step guides. It's an intro to .Net that I'm hoping will tempt DBAs to use their own existing T-SQL skills to build anything they want. With .Net the world is your oyster. And once you're building in ASP.Net, you can build .Net windows forms or anything on the framework, it's all the same. I have deliberately chosen pure .Net and purposely tried to keep away from standard SQL Server tools to monitor, as programatically .Net opens up the world to anything and everything.

SSIS and SSRS are very thorough tools and can achieve the same. But as a DBA (and not a developer) I think it's more fun using .Net. As a side project, it has taken me over a year to build this suite of reports, to cover *all* my needs, graphs, bells and all, totalling 39 reports. Maybe you could kindly share some of your reports with us. It would be good to bounce ideas.

Kind regards

Drew

Post #700436
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 2:52 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 2:22 AM
Points: 22, Visits: 292
The background I come from is as vast as .NET + SQLServer developer. I know from experience what it takes to be responsible for development in multi-tier environment. (I was lucky to work at a very small company, where I wrote all my SPs, all my C# classes, all my aspx, ascx, js, etc.) Coming from there, I know how labor-intensive it is to manage it all.

I am a naturally lazy person - i.e. if the path of least resistence leads to the same quality of a result, why not take it?

In other words, 1 year of development seems a lot. No offence. I am sure that your system works very well, and also, your intention to push DBAs to the .NET abyss seems reasonable.

It took me 2 weeks to develop and test an SSIS package which iterates through a dynamic list of servers and collects the data from them, and then it took me another week to develop SSRS reports.

Regarding the sharing of the reports, I am not quite sure, since they were developed exclusively for the company I work for, and hence they are owned by them. At a later time, maybe I can post an article with some general directions of my development work.



Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler.
Albert Einstein
Post #700441
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 4:06 AM


SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 5:41 PM
Points: 2,693, Visits: 1,203
Promising start ... eagerly awaiting more ... this is one DBA that doesn't mind diving into .Net, as long as its C#

Also, for the record, the most servers I've monitored at one time was about 20 odd. They were all setup as target servers to one master server. The master server being MY SQL Server From my server I was able to monitor failed jobs across all servers and push out changes to jobs. All alerts from the servers were forwarded back to my server as well. And thats were any alert emails were generated from.

The one addition I would have liked time to develop was an internet facing web interface, for those times that I couldn't use the corporate VPN and RDP in for a status check, but politics and workload always got in the way





Hope this helps
Phill Carter
--------------------
Colt 45 - the original point and click interface

Australian SQL Server User Groups - My profile
Phills Philosophies
Murrumbeena Cricket Club
Post #700476
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 4:19 AM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, January 12, 2014 9:26 PM
Points: 68, Visits: 172
philcart (4/20/2009)
...as long as its C#


Oh no!!! I could provide c# scripts too, but I think the articles have already been lined up for publishing. I thought for those new to this, it would be more intuitive to use vb.

The one addition I would have liked time to develop was an internet facing web interface, for those times that I couldn't use the corporate VPN and RDP in for a status check, but politics and workload always got in the way


Funny you should say that, for the purposes of the article, I was going to go through building the reports into an external DNN site, but thought it maybe a bit much at first.

Thanks for posting, Phil.

Drew
Post #700479
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 6:42 AM


SSC Eights!

SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 12:17 AM
Points: 852, Visits: 2,368
What is the minimum editions required of SQL and Visual Studio?

Being only a VBScript person and not a full blown .NET programmer (I can read it but not really write it to well) I would say putting 1 year into developing this top of project is reasonable, and helpful in displaying your need to the company (a.k.a. job security). A similar web app is used where I work now for monitoring Sun Solaris servers and Window Servers. I don't know how long it took the person to develop it.

How often will the articles be published (1 per day, per week, etc)?


Shawn Melton
PS C:\>(Find-Me).TwitterURL
@wsmelton
PS C:\>(Find-Me).BlogURL
meltondba.wordpress.com
Post #700557
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 7:16 AM


Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, January 12, 2014 9:26 PM
Points: 68, Visits: 172
shawn.melton (4/20/2009)
What is the minimum editions required of SQL and Visual Studio?

Being only a VBScript person and not a full blown .NET programmer (I can read it but not really write it to well) I would say putting 1 year into developing this top of project is reasonable, and helpful in displaying your need to the company (a.k.a. job security). A similar web app is used where I work now for monitoring Sun Solaris servers and Window Servers. I don't know how long it took the person to develop it.

How often will the articles be published (1 per day, per week, etc)?


Hi Shawn,

You know what, as far as I am aware, you can use both the free version of SQL Server (Express) and the free version of Visual Studio Web Developer edition to accomplish what we need. Why don't you download them if you haven't got them already and follow the articles. If the editions fall short, let me know, we'll find a way around the area in question.

I should have originally emphasised that it took me a year to build the suit of reports only when I could fit them in around work. There were at times weeks between writing a report. If it takes others a couple of weeks to build reports in SSMS/SSRS, I can pretty much guarantee that this isn't because of the ease of these two tools over .Net, but rather the complexity of the reports. Come to think of it, it took me at least two weeks just to figure out what reports we needed as an organisation, let alone build them.

I kid you not; VB.Net is far more intuitive than vbscript. You'll love it.

Part 2 is published on Wednesday and Part 3 on Friday. Then I think dependant on popularity, I'll be given the go ahead to publish the rest. The actual ASP.Net bit doesn't start till Part 4 though, and to the best of my knowledge there is a 4 week wait before any article is published (I submitted these in early Feb). If the wait is too long, I'll put them up on my own site, www.thebuddingdba.com

Thanks for writing,

Drew
Post #700584
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 7:56 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, November 25, 2013 5:29 AM
Points: 28, Visits: 355
Great start to a topic I've been considering for a few weeks myself. I find it very interesting that the first reply post was to use SSIS and SSRS, because that’s the way I was considering. I agree that its a noble idea, and encourage you to finish, writing this in .NET, but I have to agree with sibir1us about using existing SQL Server tools. On the flip side, I am going to use this as an excuse to get back into coding so I really can't wait.

sibir1us, you mention that you can't share code but could you at least share a list what reports you have written. I would find that to be useful without the liability of sharing intellectual property. I know that GrumpyOldDBA has posted several of his reports which were quite useful as a starting point, but I'm curious what reports others have done.

Again Thanks and can't wait for Part x, y, z,
Sean
Post #700619
Posted Monday, April 20, 2009 8:31 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 1:06 PM
Points: 174, Visits: 341
Step One - get a server.

Most people need to see it to believe it. No matter what the topic.
So, rather than spend time justifying a new server, I take the 'show them' route.

Just about every place I've gone into has at least one cast off machine.
And most have a room full of stuff. Getting the new monitoring app (or any other) off the ground takes time and usually requires few CPU cycles at first, so you can start with old hardware. And most places are more than happy to let you build a new machine from old parts - usually older workstations. So, rather than wait for a new machine, I get permission to use old parts, and if necessary, use EVAL editions to get going. Proof of concept is a wonderful approach.

Yes, you have to have everything well structured incase you need to rebuild in 6 months with a new EVAL license, until you get the real hardware, but you should have that anyway.





The more you are prepared, the less you need it.
Post #700661
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 1234»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse