Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 123»»»

Picking up Oracle development skills Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Sunday, February 8, 2009 7:20 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 3:02 AM
Points: 163, Visits: 171
Hi all,

I've been working with SQL Server in a development capacity for about 7 years now. I'm no specialist, but I'm comfortable in it and am conversant in SQL Server terminology. I need to pick up similar development skills in Oracle. I don't need to know a lot about DBA stuff, mainly just a few considerations for performance tuning. I won't be "switching" to Oracle, but rather picking up those skills and working on both platforms for the forseeable future.

What I'm looking for is a book/white paper/website which gives me, as quickly as possible, a direct comparison between SQL Server and Oracle. Some of the things I might want to know are (in order):
- ***T-SQL functions and equivalent Oracle/PL-SQL functions***
- Connection and setup methods (for one, I believe everything in Oracle resides in schemas generally under a single database?)
- An overview of the reasons people would use Oracle rather than SQL Server

Can anyone recommend a book in this regard? Failing that, can anyone recommend a book on Oracle which is, hopefully, more on the concise side and includes a function reference?

Sam
Post #652511
Posted Sunday, February 8, 2009 7:26 PM


Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:12 PM
Points: 758, Visits: 1,031
Sam,

I have two recommendations. The first is to go onto the Oracle forums (start at www.oracle.com) and ask the same question there.

The second is to browse books in that category on Amazon.com and look for something with good user reviews that seems to match what you are looking for.

You will find a lot of the basic SQL skills you already have are transferrable, but when you get into PL/SQL vs T-SQL, expect some major changes.

Good luck!
Post #652513
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 8:35 AM


SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, October 25, 2010 6:09 AM
Points: 1,621, Visits: 409
Hi

Agree with Bruce, thats the right way to go.

Check out below links to start with:

http://www.dba-oracle.com/oracle_tips_oracle_v_sql_server.htm
http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/database/oracle10g/pdf/cwp_general_o10g-vs-ss2k.pdf
http://www.mssqlcity.com/Articles/Compare/sql_server_vs_oracle.htm

Thanks -- Vijaya Kadiyala


Thanks -- Vijaya Kadiyala
www.dotnetvj.com
SQL Server Articles For Beginers



Post #652872
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 8:53 AM


Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of Fame

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 8:15 AM
Points: 3,065, Visits: 4,639
Oracle documentation is clear, comprehensive and FREE!... check here http://www.oracle.com/pls/db102/portal.all_books

If you have Transact-SQL skills please take into consideration things are not that straighforward in the Oracle side, SQL and PL/SQL are not the same.

You may want to start with PL/SQL


_____________________________________
Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

Author of Understanding Database Administration available at Amazon and other bookstores.

Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.
Post #652888
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 10:30 AM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, October 24, 2014 10:44 AM
Points: 277, Visits: 513

Download a copy of Oracle and play with it. It is relatively easy (not exactly simple, but doable) to get running and connect to. The basic ansi commands (select update insert delete) are there, but aggregates and functions are different. Understand that oracle is far more complex than SQL Server. Doing a non standard, feature rich install is not for the faint of heart, and rolling that out to production can be amazingly difficult.

One the big reasons companies use it is it's not limited to windows. It has a history of large deployments, it's backed by a large company, and Oracle skilled are available.
Post #653020
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 10:55 AM


Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of Fame

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 8:15 AM
Points: 3,065, Visits: 4,639
jgrubb (2/9/2009)
... but aggregates and functions are different.


Not to mention Triggers, Cursors, Partitioning and stuff that does not exist in the SQL Server world like bitmap indexes, star-transformation, materialized views, etc. - just to mention a few of them ;)


_____________________________________
Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

Author of Understanding Database Administration available at Amazon and other bookstores.

Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.
Post #653040
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 12:20 PM
SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, October 24, 2014 10:44 AM
Points: 277, Visits: 513
PaulB (2/9/2009)
jgrubb (2/9/2009)
... but aggregates and functions are different.


Not to mention Triggers, Cursors, Partitioning and stuff that does not exist in the SQL Server world like bitmap indexes, star-transformation, materialized views, etc. - just to mention a few of them ;)


Picky picky. I was referring to the context of queries. Don't forget also that Oracle connections default to explicit xactions, rather than implicit as in SQL Server.

If tried to catalog the differences in detail, we'd crash the poor forum server!
Post #653111
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 2:05 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:18 PM
Points: 182, Visits: 729
I went from Oracle to SQL Server and I found this book helpful.

"SQL in a Nutshell" by Kevin E. Kline
(O'Reilly press)
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596518844/

It compares usage of SQL between the various databases.
For example, the 'MERGE' statement may work with one database but not another.



Post #653217
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 2:58 PM


Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:12 PM
Points: 758, Visits: 1,031
PaulB (2/9/2009)
[...]and stuff that does not exist in the SQL Server world like bitmap indexes, star-transformation, materialized views, etc. - just to mention a few of them ;)

Reverse-key indexes and sub-partitions I might give you. But the three you picked as "do not exist in the SQL Server world" kind of sort of do, or at least in some form.

Try creating an index on a bit field in SQL Server 2005. Yes, it works. :D Does anyone know if that's still a B* index? I suspect it is.

I know that SQL Server 2008 included some additional query optimisations for star schemas.

Materialized views have existed in SQL Server for a while now. They are called "indexed views".

Post #653271
Posted Monday, February 9, 2009 3:37 PM
Hall of Fame

Hall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of FameHall of Fame

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 15, 2014 2:32 PM
Points: 3,428, Visits: 14,439
Here are articles by James Koopmann and I will upload his 74 page PL/SQL tutorial to get you started, there is a JamesKoopmann url but the home page is now loaded with video files so it is not easy to open.

http://www.databasejournal.com/article.php/2205281



Kind regards,
Gift Peddie


  Post Attachments 
KoopmannInTheBeginningThereWasSQL.pdf (29 views, 763.62 KB)
Post #653288
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 123»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse