Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««123»»

Versioning Over Time Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Thursday, December 11, 2008 6:07 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 10:15 AM
Points: 32,779, Visits: 14,938
No raise then, but it did make me look good.

And when the company was bought 4 or 5 months later I didn't get laid off and got offered a job as a manager. Then I got my $1800/yr raise which made me only slightly less compensated than my direct reports.







Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #618317
Posted Thursday, December 11, 2008 6:18 PM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, August 10, 2012 6:08 PM
Points: 1,156, Visits: 801
Steve Jones - Editor (12/11/2008)
No raise then, but it did make me look good.

And when the company was bought 4 or 5 months later I didn't get laid off and got offered a job as a manager. Then I got my $1800/yr raise which made me only slightly less compensated than my direct reports.


I was 99% sure that was the case. Having owned the "saver of the day" title many times, and having not once seen anything more than a thanks, or even a company trophy and a dinner card, I have come to know that real compensation comes through other methods.

At the outside, it maybe allowed my gaining more pull in subsequent discussions, and out-living some lay-off rounds, such as you indicated, but there you have it. Compensation increases of more than 15% only seem to come far more often by changing ladders, not the ladder you are attempting to climb.
Post #618318
Posted Thursday, December 11, 2008 10:03 PM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, January 08, 2014 2:49 PM
Points: 1,279, Visits: 2,203
This reminds me a few years ago when I was involved in a tape library upgrade.

Where to keep the old backup device and software? If need to keep backups for 7 years, it means to keep all of them up to 7 years. Are the cut off changes have been fully documented and be able to track back? Can you make sure those pieces will work a few years later when you bring them up? Is the vendor support still there if any problem?

I was wondering may be the vendor or data center can provide this kind of service (hardware/software/support) for whoever/whenever need it. Make it a business.
Post #618375
Posted Friday, December 12, 2008 5:32 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 7:14 AM
Points: 1,344, Visits: 1,983
One company I worked for solved the problem of accessing old financial data by simply keeping the old system! :D

It was in the computer room, powered down, and only switched on about once a quarter (just to check it) or when access was needed.

Fortunately, it never had a hardware problem before the data on it was so old that it could legally be discarded, but the plan was that, if it did, it would get fixed at whatever cost was needed. As I recall, it had mirrored disks and a several image backups were kept and the idea was that if a disk failed it would be possible to replace it by something equivalent, if not identical.

It also had the entire financial history that was ever needed stored in it's database so point-in-time restores were never required.

All relevant information, except the history, was migrated to the new system so it was only referred to if there was some historical query.


Derek
Post #618522
Posted Friday, December 12, 2008 8:59 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 10:15 AM
Points: 32,779, Visits: 14,938
I'm not sure you need to change ladders. Making big saves, however, does make you look good, it's remembered, and it might mean that at review time you stand out and get the biggest raise.

At the time, I was the highest paid person in my group, so I didn't have anywhere to go. In other jobs, I've made big saves and it's helped me get a raise a couple times when I've asked. Not necessarily right at that moment, but at a time not much later.







Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #618656
Posted Saturday, December 13, 2008 11:48 PM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, March 28, 2014 5:06 AM
Points: 1,204, Visits: 915
Talking like this brings me to another similar topic. Let me start from the beginning. Whenever I get software with whatever hardware I buy I like to keep it safe because I might never use it again or I might just need to use it again. I have a room in my house I call my office (you might call it a study). In this office of mine I keep all my software, cables etc. from ages ago to new. Now, and maybe the ladies can explain this, my wife sometimes get the hibijibis and start spring cleaning. This normally happens when I am not home. I also have to confess that my office is not always so very neat but hey, I work there and this is my space. Now, one day I would look for something and would go straight to where I know I put it and it is not there. I start shouting and screaming and throw all my toys out of the cot because I can't find what I am looking for and she's been in MY office springcleaning.



Manie Verster
Developer
Johannesburg
South Africa

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. - Holy Bible
I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times. - Everett Mckinley Dirkson (Well, I am trying. - Manie Verster)
Post #619229
Posted Monday, December 15, 2008 11:31 AM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, August 10, 2012 6:08 PM
Points: 1,156, Visits: 801
Steve Jones - Editor (12/12/2008)
I'm not sure you need to change ladders. Making big saves, however, does make you look good, it's remembered, and it might mean that at review time you stand out and get the biggest raise.


If only in practice that were always true. Unfortunately, companies just are not that perfect. This is even more true when changes are rolling through the company, which many are happening these days. It is rarely, "what have you done for me", but rather, "what are you doing for me". Loyalty from an employer has always been rare, and is even more so now.

I still say, I'll give them all I've got (within reason), and usually stay on even when it is not great. I do not care much about money, as long as my family has basic needs (plus a little extra) met.

However, the historical fact is that changing ladders remains the fastest way to change your pay by more than 15%. I have only personally experienced one exception (sort of) to that in 25+ years of employment, but that only happened because of a company buyout. I went from hourly with horrendous over-time, to salary... but effectively the increase was only about 5% overall... once the OT was considered with salary. And since the OT didn't stop it was even less. So I guess effectively I personally have not experienced an internal increase effectively breaking 10%, let alone 15%. And I am not sure I have ever heard of any either. I am not saying it doesn't happen; only saying it is considerably rare. On the other hand, I have twice increased over 10%, and once over 15% while changing "ladders". (Granted, the big jump was leaving military service after nearly 10 years, and going into civilian IT sector... that 28K~32K was poverty, and IT careers started around 45K to 50K.)

Just to get perspective on numbers (dropping trailing digits):
50K to 60K is 16.7%
60K to 70K is 14.3%
70K to 80K is 12.5%
80K to 90K is 11.2%
90K to 100K is 10%
100K to 110K is 9.1%
110K to 120K is 8.9%

(Amounts considered are in the USD pay range for IT based jobs of less than "Director/Department" title).

My point here, to stay on topic, is that citing potential pay increases for saving the day as a reason to hoard all the nearly useless antiquated IT paraphernalia over 7 years old just doesn't equate. There are a plentitude of other ways to save the day, that will garner far more notariety and employability, and won't fill up half my basement and my all of my storage site.

Versioning over time, for both hardware and software, must have a sunset. For me, 7 years (and at the long end, 10) should be as far as it goes. Value beyond that would be very hard to prove, unless it was and is still the "current" system in use. But the costs of maintaining will eventually climb higher than the costs of upgrading. The headaches, hassle, the lack of plug-and-play, and many other head-bangers push the issue.

By the way, would anyone like a case of 1 and 2 mb RAM sticks (and the mammoth towers they came in)? :)
Or, any of 50 network cards, all old, and various types?
Or 4 HP3LJ printers (1 with MICR!), or 6 other brands in various stages of operability?
SparQ, JAZZ, ZIP, SuperFloppy, 2nd Gen Tape, or any of many 250/500 mb HD drives?
I can't even recycle the miles of cabling (CAT 2/3/5/5E/cable/antenna/phone/etc.); they want the insulation stripped off first!
Post #619844
Posted Monday, December 15, 2008 11:41 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, March 27, 2009 7:26 AM
Points: 105, Visits: 323
dphillips (12/15/2008)
Steve Jones - Editor (12/12/2008)
I'm not sure you need to change ladders. Making big saves, however, does make you look good, it's remembered, and it might mean that at review time you stand out and get the biggest raise.


If only in practice that were always true. Unfortunately, companies just are not that perfect.


I concur. Most companies that I have worked for seem to take accomplishments in stride. You may get a "good work!" email, but it does not directly translate into cold, hard cash very easily. Maybe most Canadians can be bought with pizza and donuts ... or maybe that is just in some Canadian management course that most of my managers have taken.

Naw, my managers haven't taken any management courses. My bad.


Mia

I have come to the conclusion that the top man has one principle responsibility: to provide an atmosphere in which creative mavericks can do useful work.
-- David M. Ogilvy
Post #619854
Posted Wednesday, September 11, 2013 10:17 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, April 14, 2014 10:07 PM
Points: 1, Visits: 10
Provisioning an environment is easy these days with virtualization technologies running rampant. And figuring out what DBMS version you need to provision for a given back up is as simple as RESTORE HEADERONLY. :)

From my perspective, keeping ahead of the patch-cycle has more benefits than just security. It also prevents developers from hard-coding exploits of bugs into their procs/functions/SQL-CLR code.

YMMV

http://ozziemedes.me
Post #1493991
Posted Thursday, September 12, 2013 4:16 PM


SSCrazy Eights

SSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy EightsSSCrazy Eights

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 10:06 PM
Points: 8,283, Visits: 8,733
jeremy 60599 (9/11/2013)
From my perspective, keeping ahead of the patch-cycle has more benefits than just security. It also prevents developers from hard-coding exploits of bugs into their procs/functions/SQL-CLR code.

That's a useful advantage of staying up to date. However, my experience has been that it's not a big advantage. Most exploitable bugs don't get fixed until a release and a few service packs have followed, so the developers have plenty of time to build them into their code and forget that they will need to change it. That's not just on Microsoft systems, either.


Tom
Post #1494395
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««123»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse