Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 123»»»

The Software Comparison - Part 3 Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Tuesday, June 3, 2008 9:15 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 9:41 AM
Points: 33,063, Visits: 15,180
Comments posted to this topic are about the item The Software Comparison - Part 3






Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #511095
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 1:33 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 6:12 AM
Points: 4, Visits: 21
Before posting an article on the front page of well used website, it would be good to check that it is not full of gramatical and spelling errors. The subject sounds like some thought has gone into it, but the execution indicates otherwise!
Post #511178
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 1:55 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, July 21, 2014 4:57 AM
Points: 1,049, Visits: 3,002
Examining different areas of work to find comparisons and contrasts with IT is indeed worthwhile, with enough discussion material to cover many days of editorials. However, couldn't the ensuing discussions be combined into one thread so that points made on (for instance) day 1 don't get repeated (or forgotten about) in the discussion on day 3 or 4?

Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat
Post #511187
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 2:07 AM
SSC Eights!

SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 2:51 AM
Points: 935, Visits: 251
Interesting point comparing us with doctors. The article didn't mention 'Doctor at a party' syndrome though... In the same way that doctors who admit their profession at a social event can be badgered by other guests for free medical advice, we can be badgered about their home pc problems.

Best example from personal experience is 11pm in a bar holding a tray full of drinks when some guy went back to his car, retrieved his broken portable printer with the expectation that I would fix it their and then (in the bar, with no software or equipment to hand whatsoever). When they guy asked me where he could put his printer for me to fix, I almost told him to turn around and.... you can guess the rest. But I didn't, I told him to wait till working hours and bring it to me then. He wasn't happy, I wasn't happy. And yes I get this a lot.

Other IT colleagues have told me that at a social event never to admit that I work in IT... Good advice I think!
Post #511189
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 4:10 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, July 25, 2014 5:21 AM
Points: 1,205, Visits: 923
~paul hewitt (6/4/2008)
Interesting point comparing us with doctors. The article didn't mention 'Doctor at a party' syndrome though... In the same way that doctors who admit their profession at a social event can be badgered by other guests for free medical advice, we can be badgered about their home pc problems.

Best example from personal experience is 11pm in a bar holding a tray full of drinks when some guy went back to his car, retrieved his broken portable printer with the expectation that I would fix it their and then (in the bar, with no software or equipment to hand whatsoever). When they guy asked me where he could put his printer for me to fix, I almost told him to turn around and.... you can guess the rest. But I didn't, I told him to wait till working hours and bring it to me then. He wasn't happy, I wasn't happy. And yes I get this a lot.

Other IT colleagues have told me that at a social event never to admit that I work in IT... Good advice I think!


Yes, yes, yes, I agree! That is what happen. Makes me think of the story I heard about the doctor that phoned the plumber at 03:00 in the morning telling him his toilet is blocked and he need to come fix it now!!! The plumber said the doctor must be crazy, he will come in working hours but the doctor insisted, reminding him of the times the plumber called him in the wee hours because his child is sick. Reluctantly the plumber agreed to come. When he got there he had a look at the toilet, threw 2 asprins in it and said: "Call me in the morning if it is not better"!!!! When a person goes to the doctor and the receptionist says he had a emergency at the hospital we simply just make another booking but when someone has an IT problem then we have to jump immediately!


Manie Verster
Developer
Johannesburg
South Africa

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. - Holy Bible
I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times. - Everett Mckinley Dirkson (Well, I am trying. - Manie Verster)
Post #511238
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 6:10 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 12:13 PM
Points: 307, Visits: 565


I bet when we (software developers, DBAs, etc.) lose millions of dollars worth of a clients data (with no back up) we get sued. Comparing someones health to a software program is really, really a stretch for me.


If it was easy, everybody would be doing it!;)
Post #511290
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 6:31 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 7, 2013 6:41 AM
Points: 5, Visits: 57
After Part 3 on this topic I am motivated to reply. As an individual trained as an engineer (electrical), and after spending my 25 years or so of professional work more or less evenly divided between hardware/electrical engineering and software, I am oftentimes shocked at the lack of basic discipline, rigor, and attention to detail in the software world. It is starkly obvious to me that software development is best-viewed as an engineering discipline. The parallels are obvious and pervasive. The lack of this type of training in our IT curriculums is obvious, and growing. The emphasis is more and more on the latest wiz-bang tools and ideas at the expense of fundamentals, and the quality and cost of software suffers for it. Comparing to these other disparate occupations is entertaining, but not very useful.
Post #511299
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 6:59 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 29, 2008 12:13 PM
Points: 3, Visits: 11
I agree completely. I was a software developer and DBA for just over 20 years (wait... that makes me old). In any case, it always was one of my pet peeves to see the people who skated through a few classes and passed themselves off as seasoned developers only to find that they were hacks at best. No discipline, testing, etc. Now that I've moved to the business side, it is even more disheartening to see all of the bad developers out there. And I think that in today's world of outsourcing, we are seeing a growing "manufacturing" community of software developers and very few thinkers, designers, etc. Just pure assembly line programmers who have no clue what the real results of their coding could be. I could go on and on, but I don't have the time. In retrospect, I wish we could sue too. Maybe fewer bad programmers would be out there and the good ones would get the pay they deserve. On a positive note, most of the DBAs and Sys Admins I run into are usually really competent.

Chet
Post #511322
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 7:12 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, March 27, 2009 7:26 AM
Points: 105, Visits: 323
Trader Sam (6/4/2008)

Comparing someones health to a software program is really, really a stretch for me.


Yeah - I think that this comparison is a little over the top. I worked on quite a bit of software - even in the medical industry, and I have never been in the position to be responsible for jeopardizing someone's life.

Mia


Mia

I have come to the conclusion that the top man has one principle responsibility: to provide an atmosphere in which creative mavericks can do useful work.
-- David M. Ogilvy
Post #511332
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2008 7:17 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, February 10, 2012 2:13 PM
Points: 2, Visits: 100
The comparison seems like a stretch. Doctors save lives and take the lives of others in their hands everyday. It would be utterly pompus for a DBA to think his or her job is that important. At best, DBA's take the financial lives of companies in their hands. But we're talking money versus living, breathing organisms.
Post #511337
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 123»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse