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Posted Monday, August 21, 2006 9:18 AM
SSCrazy

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>> How much memory does SQL use on startup? <<

I disagree about the relevance of this q.  This knowledge is not only useful but vital for a senior DBA.  Otherwise, in the wrong situation, the system could end up repeatedly allocating / deallocating pages and page thrashing.  That's a sure recipe for dismal performance.



SQL DBA,SQL Server MVP('07, '08, '09)

Carl Sagan said: "There is no such thing as a dumb question." Sagan obviously never watched a congressional hearing!
Post #302941
Posted Monday, August 21, 2006 9:23 AM
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What does the actual performance have to do with the memory usage on startup?  What would be the "wrong situation", as you put it?  That the server is underpowered?  I've needed to know a lot of things in my DBA life, but have never needed to know that.


Post #302943
Posted Monday, August 21, 2006 10:38 AM
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One example using fixed memory allocationnon a cluster and the two nodes do not have the same amount of memory. The A node has 4 gb and the B node has 2.5 gb. SQL server is a fixed allocation of 3 gb with the /3GB switch in the boot.ini. try failing over this cluster from A node to B node. This is not a test but an actual support situation that I ran into and had to fix. So YES, knowing how much memory SQL Serve uses on startup is a very relevant question in production support.





Regards
Rudy Komacsar
Senior Database Administrator

"Ave Caesar! - Morituri te salutamus."
Post #302968
Posted Monday, August 21, 2006 11:10 AM
SSCrazy

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No, "wrong situation" refers primarily to an application being added to the server.  And not necessarily a full-blown business app either. 

Say, instead, Java applets are added to the server.  Java applets require a JVM.  A JVM uses a relatively large amount of RAM. 

Or say a (large) virus checker is put on the server [not preferred on a SQL Server, but some companies demand it on *every* server].  Or a larger e-mail client.  Or a combination of them and perhaps others, such as Winzip, etc..

If you don't understand how SQL's memory allocation works, you probably will not investigate more fully to determine if the other memory usage exceeds SQL's nominal allowance for other uses.  Maybe it's OK, but maybe not.  The key is that the DBA needs basic understanding to even realize that it needs checked.



SQL DBA,SQL Server MVP('07, '08, '09)

Carl Sagan said: "There is no such thing as a dumb question." Sagan obviously never watched a congressional hearing!
Post #302977
Posted Tuesday, August 22, 2006 1:12 PM
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Ditto on the ego boost LOL

I think I might have fell off my chair laughing

I'm ready for an interview now




Post #303308
Posted Wednesday, August 23, 2006 8:48 AM
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a real guru once told me that
knowing where to look for the answer to a problem
is equally as important as knowing the answer.

my 2 bits.




_________________________
Post #303522
Posted Thursday, August 24, 2006 10:57 AM
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I totally understand your rant. I worked with one of our clients - a major game seller based in the US. A temporary DBA did not know how to backup a database.
Post #303885
Posted Wednesday, February 27, 2008 2:48 PM
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Funny or not. I used these questions interviewing people for the job (production dba that is). For fun at first... Honestly I had to 'lower down' my usual questions set, because we had really bad luck hiring anybody... either market was dry either what... beautiful resumes and in person uuuppss ... like if it was somebody's resume.
It was amazing how many people blow 80+% of these simple questions with nice resumes and tons of experience. I used the questions from this article for phone screenings. Whoever passed 'simple set' and then some additional questions or did not pass 'simple set' but had a fighting chance got in person interview and e-mail doc with 20+something questions and with unlimited resources to find an answer within 1-2 days. Some of my questions were set up to force an question to clarify... amazing, ... but so few actually asked a question. People who has scored low never asked a question. People who scored low/high on simple test had similar score on more advanced questions.
I had cases when people passed 80+% of questions (from this article and my own ones ), were brought in person and froze seeing a simple performance tuning task or something of that sort. Like they have never seen the tool set before or worked with a different database all together.
I've talked to people with questions range coverage from 50 to 80. An interesting observation, how many sql dba's with tons of experience do not know much or anything about the OS ms sql server lives in... I did not expect that to be honest.

There were comments here about people making mistakes during interview because they are people.
I can answer why I'm going to put pressure during interview period. In production when all hell breaks loose and that 'thing' gores down whoever that dba is ... they going to face the pressure. I need to know at least something about what they are likely to be doing, are they going to freeze, fight, hide or .

Have being on both sides of the interview 'table' as you have guessed. Interesting that during my practice I've seen actually only on case when there was a computer in the room and somebody wanted me to do anything not on paper.
When I was interviewing I found that most of the candidates did not expect to lee a laptop at all. Kind of like ... here he/she goes about such and such in his/her experience and it all sounds wonderful and solid, ok, here I turn the laptop and ask to show something he/she was talking about 2 sec ago. And we are done, nothing. Ok... and what I supposed to think about it, because the candidate was just describing how they were solving the same problem and how many times did they see it during their current job and did the same thing... like yesterday.

I can understand stress, but I want to see what the candidate is doing too...
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