Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12»»

Recovery to a Point in Time Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Saturday, June 4, 2005 1:20 PM


SSCoach

SSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoach

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:34 PM
Points: 15,661, Visits: 28,051
Comments posted to this topic are about the content posted at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/gFritchey/recoverytoapointintime.asp

----------------------------------------------------
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #187656
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 1:44 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, October 30, 2006 6:21 PM
Points: 14, Visits: 1

It is a very good document and very useful for all the DBA's. I would rate 5 star for this.

 

cheers

Sunil S.

Post #190671
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 2:45 AM


UDP Broadcaster

UDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP BroadcasterUDP Broadcaster

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, July 21, 2014 8:43 AM
Points: 1,434, Visits: 721

As someone who's inherited the DBA role, I'm having to trawl through our databases and look at our backup plans.  Articles like this serve to highlight some of the glaring errors some of my predecessors made which hopefully I can now make right (with a little help from my friends at SQL Server Central).

Very useful article!!  Thanks

Post #190685
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 3:07 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, March 25, 2014 1:21 AM
Points: 73, Visits: 69

Excellent article as usual Grant!

I think the best part is the advice to practice the recovery steps when you're not under the cosh.  In fact I would recommend that all production DBAs do this at least once a week because:

a) You are absolutely, 100% proving that your backups are working and can be used.  Backups are meaningless until it can be proved that they can be recovered from in the event of a disaster.  By doing a test recovery once a week you are ensuring that everything is still as it should be.  I worked at a company where they had set up an excellent backup plan but, somehow, the incremental backup job got disabled and it wasn't noticed until, you guessed it, it was needed to get the company system back online!  The DBA and the company went their separate ways.

b) For the reason that Grant stated - you will be familiar with the steps involved.  Doing this once a week burns this knowledge into your brain. Practice, practice, practice.

If you're in a team then this shouldn't be too arduous and should be cycled round the team making sure that everyone knows how to do it without having to think about it.

Malc



Malcolm
DB Ghost - Build, compare and synchronize from source control = Database Change Management for SQL Server
www.dbghost.com
Post #190693
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 5:33 AM
SSC Eights!

SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, May 11, 2014 8:07 PM
Points: 891, Visits: 235
Suppose my database crashes at 8.40 am. I just have last log backup at taken at 8.30 am. Now i want to restore it upto 8.39 am. How would you do it ?


Post #190739
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 10:13 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:39 AM
Points: 56, Visits: 18

From the article:

"After you get the users out of the system and lock it down so that you’re not contending with them (if there are connections into a database, you can’t restore it),"

Yes, there's the rub. How do you get the users out of the system and lock it down? We do not have a DBA here, so as senior programmer, I get to do most of these tasks. I haven't found a good explanation as to how to do this. Can someone enlighten me?

TIA,

Owen

Post #190901
Posted Wednesday, June 15, 2005 3:47 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, October 14, 2005 8:38 AM
Points: 6, Visits: 1

There are several scripts on the web that kill SQL Server connections; here are a couple to try:

http://www.extremeexperts.com/SQL/Scripts/default.aspx (look for the Kill Connections script)

or

http://www.databasejournal.com/scripts/article.php/2110211

Blake

 

Post #191077
Posted Thursday, June 16, 2005 7:20 AM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, January 30, 2014 10:08 PM
Points: 1,038, Visits: 444

If you are able to, take a log backup of it after 8:40 (depending on the type of crash I suppose).  Then you can do the restoration stopping at 8:39.  If you cannot back it up after your 8:40 crash, then I suppose you are in lots more trouble   Maybe try some repairs using DBCC then log backup and restore to 8:39?

Anyone have further ideas?




Post #191244
Posted Thursday, June 16, 2005 7:38 AM


SSCoach

SSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoach

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:34 PM
Points: 15,661, Visits: 28,051

"Yes, there's the rub. How do you get the users out of the system and lock it down? We do not have a DBA here, so as senior programmer, I get to do most of these tasks. I haven't found a good explanation as to how to do this. Can someone enlighten me?"

I'd try it this way:

ALTER DATABASE X
SET RESTRICTED_USER
WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE

This is harsh and won't make you popular, but it does kick everyone that isn't a member of db_owner role out of the system PDQ.

However, if you've got a bunch of users in the db_owner role, in addition to have other issues, you'll need to try a different approach.



----------------------------------------------------
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #191252
Posted Thursday, June 16, 2005 7:41 AM


SSCoach

SSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoach

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:34 PM
Points: 15,661, Visits: 28,051
One thing not mentioned in the article, if possible, take one more log backup. If not possible, you may lose 9 minutes worth of data.

----------------------------------------------------
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #191255
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse