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Do I need VS2012 or 2014? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, May 30, 2014 4:30 PM
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I have SQL Server Data Tools in the Visual Studio 2010 Shell - whatever you can optionally install as part of the SQL 2012 Setup files.

I'm just starting to play with Azure, and I'm migrating some of my test databases to Azure. Apparently AdventureWorks2012 contains objects that can't be directly migrated to Azure. I'm reading that you can create an SSIS job that will address these issues.

So when I'm in SSDT and try to create a new SQL Database project, I am prompted to download and install Microsoft SQL Server Data Tools (don't I have that already?) and given the option of downloading either VS 2013 with SQL Server Tooling, or SSDT for Visual Studio 2012.

Do I need to buy new licenses for this? Will this affect SSIS Projects I've already created in the VS2010-based version? I'm also studying for the Data Warehousing certification exam. Will working with a different interface for SSIS that what the training book shows make it even more difficult?

Post #1576303
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2014 10:55 AM


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You have to remember that SQL Server Database Tools (SSDT) is an overloaded term within Visual Studio & SQL Server. There are actually two distinct tool sets that define SSDT. There is SSDT which is used to create database projects as a means for getting your database into source control and coordinating and automating builds with your application code using msbuild and associated tooling. Then, there's SSDT which includes the software for Integration Services and Reporting Services (SSIS & SSRS). That's for creating data migration and reporting projects, completely distinct from the other SSDT. It's two different sets of installs for the two different tool sets & everything.

As far as licensing goes, to my knowledge, all these tools are freely available, depending on what licenses you have. If you have a Visual Studio license, you can get the database project version of SSDT. If you have a SQL Server license, you can get the SSIS/SSRS version of SSDT. What ever cross over these two might have, I'm not sure.

SSIS won't do anything to migrate AdventureWorks to Microsoft Azure SQL Database that you couldn't do yourself by running the deployment evaluations with SSDT (the project, isn't this fun?) and fixing the issues. You could also just get the Azure version of Adventureworks. You can also play with the Red Gate hosted version of Adventureworks if you want.


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Post #1577427
Posted Wednesday, June 4, 2014 2:47 PM


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Grant Fritchey (6/4/2014)

As far as licensing goes, to my knowledge, all these tools are freely available, depending on what licenses you have. If you have a Visual Studio license, you can get the database project version of SSDT. If you have a SQL Server license, you can get the SSIS/SSRS version of SSDT. What ever cross over these two might have, I'm not sure.
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I don't think you need a license to install any of both tools.
If you don't have Visual Studio, the set-ups will install only a shell of VS.

SSDTBI (yes, the other one ) can be freely downloaded for VS2012 and VS2013. If you really want the one for VS2010, you need to use the SQL Server set-up (but you can use one with a developer edition license).

I think SSDT (the other other one) is freely downloadable for any version of VS (starting from VS 2010).




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