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The Subtle Push to the Cloud Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 6:55 AM


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Yes there is change and I can see that continuing for hardware.

I still believe long term though software development may be far less prone to constant development with consolidation around standards - languages and platforms.
Post #1565894
Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 7:01 AM


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I see your point of view. I even held a similar one back when I was a C++ developer. I knew the standard inside out. I knew where MS had deviated from and where it had yet to implement the standard. I knew about the slow coming changes to the standard...

...then came .NET and there have been plenty of other new things since too.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1565896
Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:04 AM


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Dalkeith (4/29/2014)
There are two aspects of software which make it unique in the world of Economics.

Immortality and essentially Free Duplication.

Immortality usually leads to higher prices - eg gold diamonds etc
100% Accurate free reproduction means no supply limits and which leads to zero cost.

If software does what is required and will continue to do that from now until eternity - what is the point in re-design.

Its not as if accounting theory has changed much in the last 500 years.

When open source reaches the required level of stability and usability I think the market will naturally migrate.

Data may be immortal; assuming it's not sitting on a single hard disk with no backup. Post something to the internet and it will live forever.

However, I'm interested in where this idea, that "software is immortal", came from. The way I see it, software isn't immortal or universal like gold or diamonds. It's more like currency printed on really cheap paper that's only has worth in proprietary markets and gradually fades over time until it becomes useless after ten years.
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:20 AM


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Surely software at the end of the day is digital information so in principle it could be immortal if it can still run.

Software only becomes valueless if it can't run.

Old software often runs even better on new hardware than when it was first used.
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:22 AM


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Dalkeith (4/29/2014)
Surely software at the end of the day is digital information so in principle it could be immortal if it can still run.


More in principle than in practice, I would say.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:23 AM


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Dalkeith (4/29/2014)
...
Software only becomes valueless if it can't run.
...


...or be maintained.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1565953
Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:25 AM
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The cloud is probably OK for anything that is NOT demanding steady performance for long periods of time. It has costs advantages for running short jobs like daily web crawlers or when required storage is huge / needs to be distributed to many other locations. Almost by definition it is not an enterprise worthy platform.

You do not want to notice any interference from other cloud customers and their crappy queries. You want predictable response times and the control to tune it trough a high level of hardware control. You want to use SSDs if you are not working with massive amounts of data as it is cheap and gets you a massive speed boost.

Microsoft should acknowledge that times have changed and that server hardware is a lot cheaper now then it was not too long ago. Their product is costing relatively speaking more then ever and that is not a good position to be in. They need revenue from quantity instead of margins, have as many people and products work with their platform by making it as attractive as possible. That is how a business grows and survives big changes.

Charging more for certain features few need is fine, but excluding useful features for many from the volume products is downright "moronic". They should fire the guys at the marketing department, and I seriously mean this! They accomplished alienating existing customers and have nothing new to offer to potential new customers. Long term development will be that their product delivers less value as customers get less invested and use less of the features. Alternatives will have an increasingly easier time to take over customers simply by competing on price.
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:30 AM


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I guess the current threat on Net Neutrality plays into this discussion too.

Gaz

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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:42 AM
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Open Source is becoming more attractive. The sunset of XP has driven a large number of people to Linux, especially given how easy it is to use Ubuntu and Mint. Open Source databases work pretty well.

For some reason I have an image of a large, old tree, with Microsoft emblazed along the trunk, falling down as Bill Gates and team chop it down at the base.


Dave
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Posted Tuesday, April 29, 2014 8:50 AM


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Gary Varga (4/29/2014)
I guess the current threat on Net Neutrality plays into this discussion too.

Net Neutrality is a double edged sword; sure your Netflix movies will stream more smoothly at home, if internet providers don't favor corporations willing to pay for priority bandwidth. But, on the downside, your connection to cloud data services at work has to compete with millions of schmucks who sit at home streaming NetFlix all day. Riding on Microsoft's political and financial coattail isn't such a bad thing.
Post #1565982
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