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Posted Thursday, April 17, 2014 7:59 AM
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i have a production server with 25 Gb ram ,64 bit windows and sql
i run ERP module all ram used by sql server and after close the application
RAM IS NOT REALESED IT STILL IN MAX USAGE
WHAT THE PROBLEAM
SORRY FOR MY BAD ENGLISH
Post #1562668
Posted Thursday, April 17, 2014 8:13 AM


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SQL Server never releases the memory it uses, unless told so by the operating system.
Your ERP module is not your SQL Server. When you close the application, SQL Server still runs in the background.
If this is not a server and you want to release memory back to the operating system, just cycle the SQL Server service. Since you say this is your production server, you don't really want to do that.
If you want to prevent SQL Server from using all your available RAM, set the Maximum Server Memory option in the instace properties. If this server is dedicated to SQL Server, you could set it at around 20 GB.


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Post #1562677
Posted Thursday, April 17, 2014 8:43 AM
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thnxs spaghettidba
what i understand is after closeing the ERP A application IT IS USUAL TO RAM TO GET DOWN NOT STILL MAX USAGE THAT WHAT HAPPEN IN ANY APPLICATION I RUN IN SQL SERVER IS THAT WRONG ?
Post #1562694
Posted Thursday, April 17, 2014 8:50 AM
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SQL Server gradually grabs RAM as it needs it to run queries, etc. It does not release RAM until you cycle the service or the OS tells it to give up the RAM. This does not mean SQL Server is always utilizing all of the RAM it has, it just means other applications are not able to grab the RAM.

If SQL is the only thing installed on the server, you should set MAX RAM to around 2GB less than the total RAM on the server. This way the OS can function.

Here is an article about how to set MAX RAM: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191144(v=sql.105).aspx

Hope that helps.


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Post #1562697
Posted Friday, April 18, 2014 4:21 AM


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Tony Sweet (4/17/2014)
It does not release RAM until you cycle the service or the OS tells it to give up the RAM.

or if you lower the max memory setting


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Post #1562958
Posted Friday, April 18, 2014 6:22 AM


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Perry Whittle (4/18/2014)
Tony Sweet (4/17/2014)
It does not release RAM until you cycle the service or the OS tells it to give up the RAM.

or if you lower the max memory setting


But none of us recommend you lower the max memory setting unless you know the consequences. That way leads madness, badness, and just plain crazy support issues. @=)


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Post #1562991
Posted Friday, April 18, 2014 7:17 AM


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Brandie Tarvin (4/18/2014)
But none of us recommend you lower the max memory setting unless you know the consequences.

You would do if your server starts blue screening because its under memory starvation



Brandie Tarvin (4/18/2014)
That way leads madness, badness, and just plain crazy support issues. @=)

I don't know what you're smoking but i'll have some of it


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Post #1563014
Posted Friday, April 18, 2014 7:23 AM


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Perry Whittle (4/18/2014)
Brandie Tarvin (4/18/2014)
But none of us recommend you lower the max memory setting unless you know the consequences.

You would do if your server starts blue screening because its under memory starvation


Did I miss indications that he's running into a problem? It seems to me the OP just asked the same question that comes up once a week about SQL Server memory.

Also, if the OP doesn't understand how SQL Server works with RAM, how can he understand the consequences (good and bad) of messing with the settings?


Brandie Tarvin (4/18/2014)
That way leads madness, badness, and just plain crazy support issues. @=)

I don't know what you're smoking but i'll have some of it


That depends on what state you live in. I think it's against federal regulations to send those things through the mail. @=)


Brandie Tarvin, MCITP Database Administrator

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LiveJournal Blog: http://brandietarvin.livejournal.com/
On LinkedIn!, Google+, and Twitter.

Freelance Writer: Shadowrun
Latchkeys: Nevermore, Latchkeys: The Bootleg War, and Latchkeys: Roscoes in the Night are now available on Nook and Kindle.
Post #1563017
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