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What's in a Name? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 8:31 AM


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Richard Warr (10/29/2013)
Sean Pearce (10/29/2013)
My name can be spelt a few different ways and I am used to people getting it wrong....


You make a valid point but it reminds me of the actor Sean Bean. How on Earth is anybody not skilled in the nuances of English (including many who have it as a first language) supposed to get that one right?
He should choose to be called either "Shaun Born" or "Seen Been", any other combination is just stretching the point too far


Is not the point that if someone was respectful then they would both be open to being corrected and make a reasonable attempt to apply it in their use?

Also, forget English...try Gaelic...Niamh anyone?


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1509381
Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 8:32 AM
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Richard Warr (10/29/2013)
Sean Pearce (10/29/2013)
My name can be spelt a few different ways and I am used to people getting it wrong....


You make a valid point but it reminds me of the actor Sean Bean. How on Earth is anybody not skilled in the nuances of English (including many who have it as a first language) supposed to get that one right?
He should choose to be called either "Shaun Born" or "Seen Been", any other combination is just stretching the point too far


Sean is Irish, the equivalent of the English John, hence the 'strange' pronunciation.
Post #1509382
Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 8:38 AM
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Gary Varga (10/29/2013)
Richard Warr (10/29/2013)
Sean Pearce (10/29/2013)
My name can be spelt a few different ways and I am used to people getting it wrong....


You make a valid point but it reminds me of the actor Sean Bean. How on Earth is anybody not skilled in the nuances of English (including many who have it as a first language) supposed to get that one right?
He should choose to be called either "Shaun Born" or "Seen Been", any other combination is just stretching the point too far


Is not the point that if someone was respectful then they would both be open to being corrected and make a reasonable attempt to apply it in their use?

Also, forget English...try Gaelic...Niamh anyone?


For the uninitiated, it's pronounced Neeve or a slight variation thereof.

When I was a teacher, the first time I took a particular class, I read out 'Sigh-o-bahn' from the register and got no answer, then at the end asked if anyone hadn't been called. 'Shavaughn' told me she hadn't. I took me quite by surprise that the Siobhan on my register was the 'Shavaugh' in front of me.
Post #1509392
Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 8:56 AM
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Beatrix Kiddo (10/29/2013)
david.irvine 7489 (10/28/2013)
A long time ago, I knew someone whose surname was Null. Now that I work with databases I often wonder if any of you have encountered problems with this surname? I imagine that problems were more likely in the early days of database use.


This made me smile.

I have a fairly long first name that people always, but always shorten without asking me first. There's an abbreviation I'm happy to use, and one I absolutely hate, and they always use the one I hate. I don't know how to raise it without seeming princessy so I have to let it slide .

(I don't want to say what my real name is, but if you imagine it's Rebecca, it's the equivalent of calling me Reb when I prefer to be called Becky or Rebecca.)


My wife let's it slide, I DON'T! It really annoys me (not quite what I was going to say) that my family doesn't care to say my wife's name correctly after 26 years! Seriously?

Taking your example, it would be the equivalent of them calling Rebecca "Re". I cannot convey the emotion I am experiencing right now with sufficient emphasis without the possibility of offending lots of readers, so I am going to stop, go beat my head against the wall for an hour or so, and try to once again forget how annoying family can be.


Dave
Post #1509403
Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:06 AM


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djackson 22568 (10/29/2013)
Beatrix Kiddo (10/29/2013)
david.irvine 7489 (10/28/2013)
A long time ago, I knew someone whose surname was Null. Now that I work with databases I often wonder if any of you have encountered problems with this surname? I imagine that problems were more likely in the early days of database use.


This made me smile.

I have a fairly long first name that people always, but always shorten without asking me first. There's an abbreviation I'm happy to use, and one I absolutely hate, and they always use the one I hate. I don't know how to raise it without seeming princessy so I have to let it slide .

(I don't want to say what my real name is, but if you imagine it's Rebecca, it's the equivalent of calling me Reb when I prefer to be called Becky or Rebecca.)


My wife let's it slide, I DON'T! It really annoys me (not quite what I was going to say) that my family doesn't care to say my wife's name correctly after 26 years! Seriously?

Taking your example, it would be the equivalent of them calling Rebecca "Re". I cannot convey the emotion I am experiencing right now with sufficient emphasis without the possibility of offending lots of readers, so I am going to stop, go beat my head against the wall for an hour or so, and try to once again forget how annoying family can be.


I feel your pain.

My sister-in-law, Chloe, gets called Zoe by countless friends and family. She just smiles, I get 'a bit cross' when it's the 3rd time in the same hour that I've corrected them.



On a related note of addressing people correctly, I have just been annoyed yet again at a certain manager in another department in another building who has yet again sent me an email complaining about my apparently rubbish report suite, starting the email with "Ben". Not even "Hi Ben". It's like he's demanding my attention without doing me the courtesy of greeting me first. Didn't sign his email with so much as 'rgds' either...


Ben

^ Thats me!


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Post #1509408
Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 4:00 PM
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jay-h (10/29/2013)
lnardozi 61862 (10/29/2013)
My standard reply when they mispronounce my name the third time is, "It's okay, I know stupid people can't pronounce it."

Whip THAT one out in an important meeting and see who's crushed. People mispronounce your name deliberately to assert dominance over you. Usually they're incompetents who replace understanding with aggression. I'm nice to everyone that's nice to me, but if you want to be the boss you better BE the boss.


That may occasionally be the case, but more often it is not. Trying to put someone down for mispronouncing one's name could easily be interpreted as a 'power play' also.

It's good to try to pronounce people's names correctly but outside of your regular contacts, it's not hard to get some wrong.

Sometimes a name is not pronounced as it is spelled: Ray Davies of the Kinks says his name is pronounced as 'Davis'. How many people get that wrong?



Ah, but by the THIRD time we all know what's happening. It's aggression or stupidity. I'm too busy for stupidity and I've no tolerance for aggression. We're all here to do a job (or whatever) together.
Post #1509595
Posted Wednesday, October 30, 2013 12:54 AM
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marlon.seton (10/28/2013)
nickd-799913 (10/28/2013)
My surname is deJager; with the 'J' pronounced as a 'Y'. So I run into both pronunciation and spelling issues, as it is ingrained into people to capitalize the first letter. I have run into a number of pieces of software that force me to capitalize the first letter and do not let me capitalize the third letter.


Your name is possibly a mix of French (the de part) and German (the Jager, which is possibly a corruption of Jäger) so your forebears could of have been something to do with hunting.


I think "deJager" is a Belgium name. In Dutch the "de" part equals "the". In the Netherland it would be written "de Jager" where as in Belgium names like this are usually written as "deJager".
Post #1509664
Posted Wednesday, October 30, 2013 2:37 AM


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lnardozi 61862 (10/29/2013)
...no tolerance for aggression...


That could be interpreted as being pretty aggressive in of itself.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1509680
Posted Friday, November 1, 2013 12:18 PM
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Some of the previous posts talked about name changes and potential impacts on career. Now-a-days, there are additional implications. In Texas (where I don't live thankfully) America, "what's in a name" has a serious side:

http://www.policymic.com/articles/67635/texas-new-voter-id-laws-may-roll-back-women-s-voting-rights

These new voter laws may not become a trend. But if they do, it is a factor to consider for people today who are getting married and contemplating name changes.
Post #1510754
Posted Monday, November 4, 2013 1:41 PM


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Gary Varga (10/29/2013)
Richard Warr (10/29/2013)
Sean Pearce (10/29/2013)
My name can be spelt a few different ways and I am used to people getting it wrong....


You make a valid point but it reminds me of the actor Sean Bean. How on Earth is anybody not skilled in the nuances of English (including many who have it as a first language) supposed to get that one right?
He should choose to be called either "Shaun Born" or "Seen Been", any other combination is just stretching the point too far


Is not the point that if someone was respectful then they would both be open to being corrected and make a reasonable attempt to apply it in their use?

Also, forget English...try Gaelic...Niamh anyone?

Well, at least it's the same language as "Sean". which means that English speakers will mangle it as much as they mangle Sean, perhaps more because it's a bit mroe common in the |english speaking world. But people with Gaelic names who insist on using Gaelic (Scottish or Irish) spellings for them should perhaps not be surprised when the Gaill Wogs Sasunnaich Anglophones mis-pronounce them: the rather well known singer Eithne ended up using the spelling "Enya", most people whose name is Seumas use the Anglicised spelling "Hamish" (sounds like the vocative form, Sheumais), every Ailean I know spells his name "Alan" when communicating with Anglophones, "Cailean" spells his name "Colin".

Of course people keep on telling me there's a misprint on my passport or on my driving licence, and so on; the UK passport and identity service doesn't tell me that, those people have either more sense or more knowledge. I use either the name Tom or just the initials C M when in English (or indeed any non-Gaelic language) and don't get any mispronounciations (although some do insist on expanding Tom to Thomas, which is no name or nickname of mine and never has been).


Tom
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