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Difficulity with SQL Logins and Language settings Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, April 25, 2013 5:18 AM
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Hi All,

We have supplied a customer with a SQL based accounts package, however we have hit a problem with the language settings. This software requires the Language setting to be "English". On the site that we have installed the software on, the server settings and all SQL Login settings are set to "British English" to cater for other applications used on that server. This is causing the software we installed to crash when reading dates.

The other factor that contributes to the issue is that you can only use Windows Authentication with this software, you cannot use SQL Auth or a service account to connect to the database.

I have resolved the issues for most users, by creating a SQL login for a user group that has all users using the software. I have set the language to "English" for that login, and for most users that works.

The problem I am left with, is that there are a handful of users, that are also members of other SQL Groups, for example the domain admins are admin members of SQL, and have the sysadmin role. When they use the software, SQL does not care which login to use when connecting to the database, it just finds that this user has access to the database and uses the first user group that has a successful connection.

The other user groups have to stay as "British English" for the existing software on SQL. So is it possible to either set the language at database level, or force the connection to our database to go through our the user group we set up, and not any of the other user groups.

I have suggested to the customer installing a new named instance of SQL, but they are not keen on that route.

Many thanks,

Trevor.
Post #1446420
Posted Thursday, April 25, 2013 5:12 PM
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See if you can modify the database connection string used by the accounting package to connect.

If so, try adding Language=British to the connection string and see if it solves the problem.

As you have mentioned, the easiest way is to install a separate named instance and configure the logins appropriately.

Just an aside, is your accounting database collation-compatible with the other databases? If not, then a separate instance becomes mandatory.
Post #1446751
Posted Friday, April 26, 2013 3:02 AM
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Thanks for this, as far as I know the connection string it in the compiled exe. It also does not use a dsn to connect to the database.

We have got round the problem by creating SQL logins for the 2 problem users and setting the language to "English". SQL seems to look for the users first before the groups and use that as the login to connect with. We have not given these users access to the CRM database through these logins, so they still access that database through the original CRM DB user groups (still set to "British English"). Therefore both apps work.

Not ideal, but at least it works ok.

Trevor
Post #1446857
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