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Posted Monday, March 25, 2013 3:45 PM


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jfogel (3/25/2013)
Good point but the writings of Frank or King were one offs and of value from the start. Important information will migrate to new storage methods so it is accessible. I think it will be a rare occurance to find a masterwork on a 5 1/4.

An original manuscript or letter written on paper, the only copy in existence, can be discovered centuries after it was written and it's significance immediately understood.

Likewise it's also possible for a single copy of a manuscript to exist on a 5.25 floppy or Zip Disk laying around in the trunk of a deceased author, but an old floppy is not readily accessible and so most people would dismiss it as junk.
Post #1435187
Posted Monday, March 25, 2013 9:48 PM


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Eric M Russell (3/25/2013)
jfogel (3/25/2013)
Good point but the writings of Frank or King were one offs and of value from the start. Important information will migrate to new storage methods so it is accessible. I think it will be a rare occurance to find a masterwork on a 5 1/4.

An original manuscript or letter written on paper, the only copy in existence, can be discovered centuries after it was written and it's significance immediately understood.

Likewise it's also possible for a single copy of a manuscript to exist on a 5.25 floppy or Zip Disk laying around in the trunk of a deceased author, but an old floppy is not readily accessible and so most people would dismiss it as junk.

You may wish to note that the originally guaranteed retention period for a 5.25 floppy was five years. Will you please tell me, with a justification, what is the chance that anyone, not just most people, can discover its academic significance AND DISMISS IT AS JUNK, a mere 100 years after it was buried in a landfill, possibly with ferromagnetic media around?

(This is also an indirect response to the previous posts that mention Egyptian hieroglyphics carved into a stone.)

Edit: making the landfill point stronger.
Post #1435247
Posted Tuesday, March 26, 2013 4:21 AM


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jfogel (3/25/2013)
Good point but the writings of Frank or King were one offs and of value from the start. Important information will migrate to new storage methods so it is accessible. I think it will be a rare occurance to find a masterwork on a 5 1/4.

I'm afraid I disagree. Given how many Jewish children were murdered in the war years, Anne Frank's diary is tragically highly unlikely to have been a one-off. Moreover, despite its literary merit, it only became valuable to the rest of the world once the world wanted to make a statement about Nazi atrocities, so it was hardly of value "from the start".

In the good old tradition of "what-iffing", if Germany had won the war, Anne Frank's diary would either never have been published or would have had to wait decades (even centuries) before prevailing opinion modified enough for it to become acceptable. On the flip side, we might have been arguing that Hitler's "Mein Kampf" was a one-off and of value from the start instead of the reality now where most see it as a historical oddity of interest only because of the extreme infamy of its author.

I'd agree it will be a rare occurrence to find a masterpiece on a floppy disc, but then it's a rare occurrence to find a masterpiece anywhere. In this digital age, it's going to become (IMHO) increasingly likely that valuable discoveries will be made on old digital media.


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Post #1435368
Posted Tuesday, March 26, 2013 5:43 AM


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How many of you maintain machines with an 8", 5 1/4, 3.5, Jazz and Zip drives?

Cheers
Post #1435401
Posted Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:44 AM
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jfogel (3/26/2013)
How many of you maintain machines with an 8", 5 1/4, 3.5, Jazz and Zip drives?


Not going to argue that things like this are rare but when you see an IBM 360/20 or a System 3 Mod 6 for sale on EBAY and three or four people are bidding you got to wonder.


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Post #1435579
Posted Tuesday, March 26, 2013 10:47 AM


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Some just like to play with the past. I bought a mint Apple IIC on EBay for that very reason and I'm sure some have a more productive reason for such purposes. For me, I just make it a point to migrate important things to newer media so I'm never worried about what is on an old disk or disc. I don't like clutter.

Cheers
Post #1435617
Posted Wednesday, March 27, 2013 8:45 AM


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jfogel (3/26/2013)
How many of you maintain machines with an 8", 5 1/4, 3.5, Jazz and Zip drives?


I've had all of those, have media, and currently have none of those drives in the house. Not sure I care as most of the stuff I had was code that has been superseded.

However it does make me wonder how many things won't make sense in a generation to people. Why do we start with a "C:" drive? Movies that use floppy drives for transport will alien to many people.







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Post #1435952
Posted Wednesday, March 27, 2013 9:07 AM


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I watched the Phil Spector movie on HBO Sunday night (it was terrible by the way) and in one scene a lawyer is talking about how a jury wont care about his success as a producer from so many years ago. To demonstrate this she pulls out an old 45 and an adapter to allow it to play on a turn table using a different speed. She asks a young lawyer what he thinks it is and the response is that it is an old computer disk. My oldest daughter asked me if we had color when I was a kid. I said sure, color film has been around for many years. No, did we see in color? she asked. Now that was funny.

C: is the default because it was assumed that floppy drives would take A and B and I recall early digital cameras that used floppy disks for storage. I don't have any of the devices I mentioned in my prior post and so far life has been just fine without them. Soon enough optical media will be added to that list.


Cheers
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Posted Wednesday, March 27, 2013 9:58 AM


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It's just funny to see it in media. I use records in a talk and once in awhile I meet someone that has no idea what they are.

As it is, I hope that we get away from C:, d:, etc. I try to avoid them in code where I can. I've been without a Cd/DVD drive in a laptop for 3 years. Just ordered a new one without one as well.







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Post #1436008
Posted Wednesday, March 27, 2013 10:20 AM


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My last two laptops didn't come with them as well. I buy Lenovo X Series machines and since they are small there is no room. I do buy the docking station for them but the UltraBay always has a second hard drive in it. I find myself having to burn DVDs rather then read them so I connect that to a eSATA PC Express card when needed. That is rare though.

Cheers
Post #1436019
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