Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««123»»

The Career Path Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 6:24 AM


Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 7, 2012 9:23 AM
Points: 304, Visits: 716
I know that I am very lucky in my career. I fell accidentally into technology in 1979 and now, so many years later, I can look back and be thankful that my career did include management, but in every job I have maintained the technical side too. As much as I manage a gaggle of people, I also still design, still code, and am still always uptight about keeping up with the latest technologies.

But as I look back, most of the technical people I knew so many years ago gave up and moved into other fields. In fact, it was the coming of .NET and the Web that were the biggest "house cleaners" for those of us who came up in earlier development systems. One of the best developers I ever worked with is now a Real Estate salesman. Another is a Stock Broker. Almost all of them bailed out of technology because of .NET and the Web and how it all ended the haydays of RAD (Rapid Application Development) and the ability to be independant developers. What used to be creative talent had become "march in lock-step to Microsoft's music".

Its hard for today's younger developers to even comprehend that we used to build apps that lived for 10, 20 even 30 years. The poor Web technies today are changing sites day in, day out - they have little or no comprehension of what was once called "digital kingdoms" (apps that had a long life span).

Hence, the question posed in the editorial is to me, unanswerable. This is because tomorrow some new technology could emerge that changes development yet again and all one can do is react. Thus, admittedly, my career path was not planned at all, it just went this way and this is how I reacted.

I suppose the best answer to the question posed is this: Be assured that if you plan a career path in technology, you will most likely be wrong. Thus, its better to have the talents and skills to react, than it is to presume you can know where technology will take you.


There's no such thing as dumb questions, only poorly thought-out answers...
Post #1154975
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 6:37 AM
SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, October 9, 2014 8:27 AM
Points: 1,639, Visits: 1,984
I had actually gotten a Team Lead position at one point which I really enjoyed. It was assigning tickets to individual team members and helping them through them. I liked challenging them and seeing them grow. It was also nice to have time to tackle some of the more technical tickets that I didn't want to keep for myself. Then I got assigned to a couple other projects that required management I had to choose between keeping myself technical and providing those that worked under me the support they needed.

Had I remained just a Team Lead I probably would have enjoyed being in that position for quite some time. I had the opportunity to keep myself very technical through both working my own stuff and helping with the more difficult tickets I passed out. Once I lost that I knew I had to move and changed to our development department to code the fixes to the bugs I had previously been reporting. And now I'm at a different company getting experience with the administration side of things.

I'm not sure how moving up the chain is going to go at my new place since there are only two of us. There are formal job levels and I'm sure in time I'll move up that. For taking on new challenges, it seems like it's just going to be picking up projects and running with them. There is an Architect but I'm not sure if there will be need for more than one.
Post #1154989
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 6:43 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, October 7, 2014 5:10 AM
Points: 180, Visits: 528
@ SSC Veteran, Well said.
Hence it's not all that bad to be a jack of all trades, but you still have to be a master of something.
Post #1154995
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:11 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 10:48 AM
Points: 32, Visits: 606
Early in my career, I made a lateral move to a small software development company from a secure government position where I was a mainframe computer operator and UNIX/Novell admin. I did this primarily because the new company was using this interesting New Technology called Windows NT 3.51. Part of the job required that I be certified so I took a couple of tests and was an MCP. Throughout my career there have been many milestones like that very first certification. I was doing some networking setup and SQL Server 6.5 back in those days too in a support capacity and realized that database technology was where I would focus.

Many years later I find myself in a management role and there are those who say that you can not be an effective manager if you are a technical manager. I disagree with that opinion. I manage 11 DBAs and report admins and have time for technical projects, performance tuning, SSIS package development, and all the myriad fun things DBAs do every day. And of course there are the performance evals, status reports, budgets, hiring, etc but that is such a small part of the role.

I believe you can choose your technical career path but it must start with a technology you are passionate about, put the time in to be an expert, deal with the stress of on call and sleepless nights, be courteous and likable, and you will get the recognition and all of the career benefits and opportunities that go along with it.

And finally I believe everyone who chooses a technology path must spend at least a year in a Help Desk/Product Support role.
Post #1155026
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:26 AM
Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, October 20, 2014 11:42 AM
Points: 755, Visits: 1,927
One thing about the tech world: the only constant is change. Your career path will change direction multiple times as technologies and business requirements change. So it's always good to keep your hands on technologies outside of your immediate specialty ... you nevere know where that knowledge will lead..



...

-- FORTRAN manual for Xerox Computers --
Post #1155037
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:31 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, October 7, 2014 5:10 AM
Points: 180, Visits: 528
@ jay holovacs,
I share the same sentiments with you. For i am busy with VMWare as part of my DBA and one i finished VMWare, i will engage in HyperV even though im not a fan of HyperV.
Post #1155038
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:36 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, June 13, 2013 1:26 PM
Points: 56, Visits: 125
At my company, I was hired as a DBA and will retire as a DBA with no vertical or Horizontal moves inside the company. Other people were shocked I was given the actual title of DBA instead of another tech person.

I would love to have a DBA I,II,III,IV and V level as my skills grow and such. This would give me a reason other then personal satisfaction to learn and advance.

John


John Burris
MCITP Database Administrator
Post #1155042
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:40 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 9:57 AM
Points: 7,801, Visits: 9,551
Rodney Landrum (8/5/2011)
And finally I believe everyone who chooses a technology path must spend at least a year in a Help Desk/Product Support role.

Absolutely right that technical people (and preferably nontechnical managers too) should have experience of support. Senior developers and designers and architects who have no support experience often cause more harm than good, and the same goes for those without support experience who think they can micro-manage developers, designers, architects, or support staff.
But when I was young, we didn't have helpdesks and everyone did support anyway - it was regarded as part of a developer's job to interact with customers, discuss their problems with them, and help them generally. I can remember (way back in the 60s) crawling around on the floor at a customer site, with my MD (I suppose that's CEO in USSpeak) crawling beside me, while we were trying to work out why some hardware was doing strange things. So I'm not convinced that it has to be a year in a spefically support role, it can be time in a job with not dedicated to support but with a high support content.


Tom
Post #1155047
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 7:43 AM
Right there with Babe

Right there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with BabeRight there with Babe

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, October 20, 2014 11:42 AM
Points: 755, Visits: 1,927
Tom.Thomson (8/5/2011)
Rodney Landrum (8/5/2011)
And finally I believe everyone who chooses a technology path must spend at least a year in a Help Desk/Product Support role.

Absolutely right that technical people (and preferably nontechnical managers too) should have experience of support. Senior developers and designers and architects who have no support experience often cause more harm than good, ....


True. Years ago I worked for a Japanese manufacturing company, they would hire mechanical engineers out of school and put them in a machine shop for a few months so they would understand the implications of their eventual design decisions.


...

-- FORTRAN manual for Xerox Computers --
Post #1155051
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 8:50 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, September 8, 2014 1:37 PM
Points: 64, Visits: 253
My dream job is to be a consulting engineer. I want to move from project to project, bestowing all the hard-won lessons I've acquired over the years to those that seek my advice.

The best part is that, along the way, I will acquire even more knowledge as I am exposed to new technical challenges. By the way, this sort of job requires a great many soft skills. You have to be able to listen well and communicate better than ever before. You have to be able to handle different personalities because often times a "referee" is required. You have to be able to make good decisions when confronted with competing solutions or opinions.

Personally, I like the idea of a consulting engineer position because it is a challenging blend of technology and people.
Post #1155107
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««123»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse