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Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:00 AM


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Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)
This one may be particularly useful: Visual Studio 2010 SQL Server Database Projects


Thanks for the references!




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Post #1076168
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:02 AM
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Duncan Pryde (3/10/2011)
Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)
This one may be particularly useful: Visual Studio 2010 SQL Server Database Projects


Thanks for the links - I discovered after I posted that you have a number of entries on your blog as well which look interesting.

I think what I'm after is some idea as to why I should start using "Datadude" if I've never used it before. I'll have a look through the various articles and see what I can find though.

Thanks,

Duncan


yeah, that's a hard one to articulate. For me, I reached a point where it just "clicked" and I don't think that can happen until you use the product.

The big benefits as far as I can see them are:
-Development-time error checking (i.e. find out about errors before you actually run the code - so you wont get caught by deferred name resolution)
-Declarative development. (i.e. You define what the database state should be and the tool works out how to get it to that state, as opposed to you having to author all of the ALTER statements)
-Code analysis (i.e. it highlights bad coding practices)


Jamie Thomson
http://sqlblog.com/blogs/jamie_thomson
Post #1076170
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:18 AM
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Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)


The big benefits as far as I can see them are:
-Development-time error checking (i.e. find out about errors before you actually run the code - so you wont get caught by deferred name resolution)
-Declarative development. (i.e. You define what the database state should be and the tool works out how to get it to that state, as opposed to you having to author all of the ALTER statements)
-Code analysis (i.e. it highlights bad coding practices)


The second one does look like it might swing it. Up to now, we've tended to hand-write upgrade and rollback scripts for each release. It works, but it's time-consuming and quite clunky. I imagine this would be an improvement on that approach.
Post #1076179
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:23 AM
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Group: General Forum Members
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Duncan Pryde (3/10/2011)
Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)


The big benefits as far as I can see them are:
-Development-time error checking (i.e. find out about errors before you actually run the code - so you wont get caught by deferred name resolution)
-Declarative development. (i.e. You define what the database state should be and the tool works out how to get it to that state, as opposed to you having to author all of the ALTER statements)
-Code analysis (i.e. it highlights bad coding practices)


The second one does look like it might swing it. Up to now, we've tended to hand-write upgrade and rollback scripts for each release. It works, but it's time-consuming and quite clunky. I imagine this would be an improvement on that approach.


Definitely. On a recent project we moved to a 2-weekly release cycle. We could never have done that if we'd had to manually author our DB upgrade scripts.

I won't say there aren't caveats to this -nothing is that simple when data is involved- but you'll find that nearly all scenarios are possible.


Jamie Thomson
http://sqlblog.com/blogs/jamie_thomson
Post #1076184
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:31 AM
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Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)
Duncan Pryde (3/10/2011)
Jamie Thomson (3/10/2011)


The big benefits as far as I can see them are:
-Development-time error checking (i.e. find out about errors before you actually run the code - so you wont get caught by deferred name resolution)
-Declarative development. (i.e. You define what the database state should be and the tool works out how to get it to that state, as opposed to you having to author all of the ALTER statements)
-Code analysis (i.e. it highlights bad coding practices)


The second one does look like it might swing it. Up to now, we've tended to hand-write upgrade and rollback scripts for each release. It works, but it's time-consuming and quite clunky. I imagine this would be an improvement on that approach.


Definitely. On a recent project we moved to a 2-weekly release cycle. We could never have done that if we'd had to manually author our DB upgrade scripts.

I won't say there aren't caveats to this -nothing is that simple when data is involved- but you'll find that nearly all scenarios are possible.


That's good to know - we've wasted quite a lot of time in the past testing and debugging upgrade scripts (someone always forgets to add something!)

Thanks for all your extra information - it's been really useful.

Duncan
Post #1076192
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:49 AM
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I could not find any Davelopment Tools that where released in the last ten years on MSDN....

I wonder if this is another victim of the Question submission tools edit function.
Post #1076202
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:51 AM
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mohammed moinudheen (3/9/2011)
I had no idea about the answer, I guessed it and got it right.

Off late, there are so many questions on Visual Studio tools in QotD section.

It would be great if someone could share names of books on this topic for beginners.


The Visual Studio 2010 documentation is online here:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd831853.aspx

It does not have any infomration on Davelopment tools.
Post #1076204
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:52 AM
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SanDroid (3/10/2011)
I could not find any Davelopment Tools that where released in the last ten years on MSDN....

I wonder if this is another victim of the Question submission tools edit function.


I suspect its more a victim of my poor grasp of english, which is rather disappointing given it is my native language :)


Jamie Thomson
http://sqlblog.com/blogs/jamie_thomson
Post #1076207
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 7:30 AM
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We recently upgraded to Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate and I had some free training time, so I dove into the database project stuff. At first, I thought I was wasting my time, but like Jamie said, it all started to "click" at a certain point, and you get it. And, it's pretty awesome what you can do, especially with the refactoring of columns - automatically changing all the objects that reference that column, having each object as it's own file (yes, 1000 per folder limit due to performance, heh). What can take me hours on end happened in 2 minutes with this tool. Seriously.
Post #1076246
Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011 7:38 AM
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I wan't everyone to understand something.
1000 files is a performance recomendation created a few years ago using a 32bit single core processor system running what I would call a limited configuration as a base point.
I have actually had to change this default configuration value in every version of Database Tools.

If you have a good dev system with plenty of memory, more than one CPU core, and you are not running 32bit windows install on 64bit hardware importing Databases with almost 8000 objects are no real problem.


The amount of time these tools save you are worth any system lag you may experiance.
Post #1076250
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