Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase

Picking topics to blog about Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Wednesday, January 19, 2011 9:04 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, August 29, 2013 1:44 PM
Points: 144, Visits: 426
I've seen lots of comments from people on here and elsewhere about the benefits of blogging, both in terms of focusing and improving your knowledge on certain subjects, and improving your writing skills.

It seems like some people more than others manage to come up with a regular stream of ideas to write about, and without simply rehashing things already written elsewhere.

What I was wondering is how or where do people come up with their ideas. Do you simply write about things you come across in your day to day work, or deliberately seek out ideas elsewhere?

I've quite enjoyed my first attempts at blog writing, but I find it hard at times to think of things to write about, not just in terms of subjects, but also having the confidence in my own knowledge to think I could contribute something worthwhile to a chosen topic.
Post #1050136
Posted Wednesday, January 19, 2011 9:11 AM


SSCoach

SSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoachSSCoach

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 5:20 PM
Points: 17,600, Visits: 15,462
Two sources of ideas from me are:

1. Day to day work and solutions/problems that I encounter there.
2. Community involvement. Helping in the forums or on twitter as well as with the local User Group. Ideas and questions pop up from everywhere and it is then a matter of time to research and write about it.




Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
I have given a name to my pain...
MCM SQL Server


SQL RNNR

Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw
Posting Data Etiquette - Jeff Moden
Hidden RBAR - Jeff Moden
VLFs and the Tran Log - Kimberly Tripp
Post #1050142
Posted Wednesday, January 19, 2011 10:31 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 1:15 PM
Points: 5,383, Visits: 7,454
Keith Langmead (1/19/2011)
I've seen lots of comments from people on here and elsewhere about the benefits of blogging, both in terms of focusing and improving your knowledge on certain subjects, and improving your writing skills.

It seems like some people more than others manage to come up with a regular stream of ideas to write about, and without simply rehashing things already written elsewhere.


I had the same problem trying to determine what I wanted to write some articles here on SSC on, Keith. I feel your pain. The end result: You're not going to be able to avoid the re-hash.

What you CAN do, however, is add value to that re-hash... and give out any necessary credit if you lean heavily on any one work. Value could be rewording it in a way to reach a less experienced userbase. It could be further research done on a subject that exposes weaknesses in assumptions we use every day (working on one of these right now, actually, regarding index selectivity).

There are giants who have walked these paths before us. They're well trod and pounded relatively flat. It's our job to pave them, now, and put the flowers along the sides.



- Craig Farrell

Never stop learning, even if it hurts. Ego bruises are practically mandatory as you learn unless you've never risked enough to make a mistake.

For better assistance in answering your questions | Forum Netiquette
For index/tuning help, follow these directions. |Tally Tables

Twitter: @AnyWayDBA
Post #1050200
Posted Wednesday, January 19, 2011 11:58 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:43 PM
Points: 39,866, Visits: 36,206
Keith Langmead (1/19/2011)
What I was wondering is how or where do people come up with their ideas. Do you simply write about things you come across in your day to day work, or deliberately seek out ideas elsewhere?


Stuff asked here often. Stuff that I start on in one blog post then realise it'll take more than one. Stuff in my speciality area that I get asked about and realise will take more than a couple of lines to answer. Comments from speakers or other bloggers



Gail Shaw
Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server 2008, MVP
SQL In The Wild: Discussions on DB performance with occasional diversions into recoverability

We walk in the dark places no others will enter
We stand on the bridge and no one may pass

Post #1050285
Posted Thursday, January 20, 2011 7:15 AM


SSChampion

SSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampion

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 6:38 AM
Points: 13,755, Visits: 28,147
It's pretty much whatever comes in front of you from day to day that you are either fascinated with, excited by or knowledgeable about. Preferably all three. You can't worry about the rehash, because chances are extremely high that someone, somewhere, has already written about whatever you're writing about. My most recent post was about why do log files fill up. Believe me, other people have posted about it. But it's still one of the most frequent questions we see on the forums. You could write about it tomorrow and help three or four people that haven't seen the 7,432 other posts by other bloggers on the exact same topic.

----------------------------------------------------
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #1050771
Posted Thursday, January 20, 2011 7:25 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 3:43 PM
Points: 39,866, Visits: 36,206
Grant Fritchey (1/20/2011)
My most recent post was about why do log files fill up. Believe me, other people have posted about it.


A topic I'm in the middle of writing an article on. From a completely different starting point to what Grant used.



Gail Shaw
Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server 2008, MVP
SQL In The Wild: Discussions on DB performance with occasional diversions into recoverability

We walk in the dark places no others will enter
We stand on the bridge and no one may pass

Post #1050782
Posted Thursday, January 20, 2011 7:38 AM


SSChampion

SSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampionSSChampion

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 6:38 AM
Points: 13,755, Visits: 28,147
GilaMonster (1/20/2011)
Grant Fritchey (1/20/2011)
My most recent post was about why do log files fill up. Believe me, other people have posted about it.


A topic I'm in the middle of writing an article on. From a completely different starting point to what Grant used.


See!


----------------------------------------------------
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #1050796
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase

Permissions Expand / Collapse