The Counter Offer - Part 2

  • Jack Corbett

    SSC Guru

    Points: 184380

    Eric M Russell (10/16/2015)


    As for the option of sticking around and "fixing" your current job, unless you're in a position of influence, I find that ideal outcome to be plausible... but unlikely. It's been my observation that often times someone with bright ideas must actually move on to other things, before their ideas are taken seriously and accepted.

    Or when a high-prices consultant comes in and says the same things you have been saying.

    Jack Corbett
    Consultant - Straight Path Solutions
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  • GeorgeCopeland

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6931

    I guess my experience has changed the way that I evaluate workplace problems. I used to be unhappy that the system was a piece of junk and nobody in management cared. I didn't notice at the time that the system had 10k paying clients. Getting people to pay for software is an amazing skill. Any system with 10k paying clients is golden, I don't care what a piece of junk it might be technically. Improve, refactor, enhance. So long as management brings home the bacon, I don't give a flip if they can even spell SQL.

  • Eric M Russell

    SSC Guru

    Points: 125068

    As for the option of sticking around and "fixing" your current job, unless you're in a position of influence, I find that ideal outcome to be plausible... but unlikely. It's been my observation that often times someone with bright ideas must actually move on to other things, before their ideas are taken seriously and accepted.

    GeorgeCopeland (10/16/2015)


    Eric: So things don't get fixed at the current job, it will be any different at the next??? Not really.

    I guess I'm a optimistic pessimist. I'm will to accept the fact that I can't change a bad situation, but I don't accept my involvement in the situation. When confronted with a bad situation, I assume that it's the exception rather than the rule, so rolling the dice again with a new opportunity will at least allow me a chance to find something better. If you look at the career track of most successful people, particularly in the business or technology arena, they walked away from a lot of things. Regardless of drought, economic recession, or war: they find a way to make their own luck.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    A key thing to remember about an offer is that it isn't an agreement. It is a proposal for a contract between two parties of which at any point either party can accept or decline. The terms may have been discussed and negotiated but agreement only occurs through ratification e.g. by signing or, arguably, by handshake.

    There is a reason most people feel bad when they have not been offered a job, an assignment, a counter offer etc. That reason is that they are all forms of rejection. The rejection is not necessarily of the individual though but maybe of the situation regarding the individual.

    Act professionally and all will be OK. If you are honest and upfront with all parties then any reasonably party will accept any outcome. Due to their own current pressures they might be off hand or even rude at the instant of rejection, however, in the longer term they will be more understanding. If they are not reasonable then you should not concern yourself.

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

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  • jmherod

    Newbie

    Points: 1

    Agreed.  One hardly ever leaves due to co-workers.

    It's almost always management's defects that cause one to go down the path of finding a new situation.

  • Bruce.Edgar 26817

    SSC Rookie

    Points: 33

    Well I pretty much agree with the general consensus, I did run into one instance where I interviewed with a company and during the interview I told them they really didn't need a full time programmer, and would be willing to assist them on weekend and evenings.

    The General Manager stressed that Oh Yes! We have plenty of work for you. They made a good offer, and the benefits were good.

    I returned to my current company and gave them 2 weeks notice. The Regional Manager did counter offer but it wasn't as good as the new company, so I said thank you for the generous offer but I'm going to take a chance with the new company.

    I was with the new company a year when they decided they didn't need a programmer at all, general manager was in tears when she told me, but what can you do.

    My position at the previous company had been closed out and wasn't going to be filled. So to the Job Search Sites and polish my resume up.

    Excepting a counter offer would scare me a little, the company/manager would remember that you were thinking of leaving and you might be the first to go in a RIF.

    Another incident, when I first got my Computer degree, I was offered a job and excepted it. Took the Plant Manager I was excepting a new job. Then the position fell through, now I had no place to go. Told the Plant Manager and his reply was ... No problem, I'll extend your resignation until the end of the month. Well ... you can guess how I felt. It worked out, the same company interviewed for a position in another location, I excepted that one and was able to attend a major University and get my Bachelor's Degree in Computers.

  • steve.powell 14027

    SSC Veteran

    Points: 243

    Dale Turley wrote:

    Eric M Russell (10/16/2015)


    As for the option of sticking around and "fixing" your current job, unless you're in a position of influence, I find that ideal outcome to be plausible... but unlikely. It's been my observation that often times someone with bright ideas must actually move on to other things, before their ideas are taken seriously and accepted.

    I've found there is a limited time with a new company that suggestions are taken seriously, after that you become part of the furniture.

    I've found that can be true, but not always.

    Yes, companies can become complacent when they have 'loyal', long serving staff, but some do make the effort to listen and adapt 'cause they know their business depends on it and experienced employees are a real asset with that.

    Of cause, it also depends on the size of the business and how much interaction there is between senior management and staff. The more interaction there is (easier with smaller businesses), the more they'll trust the staff's recommendations. The more remote the senior management, the more they'll rely on outside recommendations, even if those just make more work for no gain.

  • Andy Warren

    SSC Guru

    Points: 119676

    I see a lot of fear about taking or considering counter offers, I get it. But on the manager side, things look a little different. One part is that replacing someone sucks. It costs real money (interview time, recruiting fees, lost productivity, etc) and puts them in the weeds for months or longer. If they can avoid that by spending some money, they will (and should), assuming the employee leaving isn't more trouble than they are worth (rare). If they can fend off losing someone, they (and their boss) will see it as a win. The other part is that its hard to get an employee a large raise unless its tied to a promotion OR they have an offer in hand. Your boss may well want to do more, but their hands are tied until you give them the lever.

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