How To Write An Interview Winning Resume

  • xsevensinzx

    One Orange Chip

    Points: 25543

    For me, I worked in the video game industry for 7+ years. I also worked on the marketing side of things within technology. I used to keep it short and to the point. Something that was easy to read, yet communicated my skillset and what I had to offer to a potential organization.

    Unfortunately, in the technology world, sometimes that is not enough. I had many agencies tell me that more was better. That I should be listing out all the multi-million dollar projects that I worked on and include details on what I had to offer. On top of that, trashing that catch-all resume and tailor each resume specifically to the job you want.

    When I did that, I got hired. Since then, most agencies I've worked with ask for the same. They don't want simple easy resumes in my area because they are too vague. Technology specific hires are burning companies because they simply rushed the hiring process and really didn't know anything about the candidate they were bringing in.

    But, that could just be my area.

  • quackhandle1975

    SSChampion

    Points: 10963

    Nice article John, thanks. I will say that that "two page maximum" can sometimes hinder yourself when you have been contracting for over ten years and have many clients. I like to add /remove clients depending on the role I go for. I haven't found using three pages being a hindrance so far.

    I suppose one of the advantages of LinkedIn is that is it almost an online CV, possibly the days of the standalone "CV document" could be at an end? Oddly enough my CV format/layout came from "CV wizard" from Word97. It can be a bit tricky adding more paragraphs but it's got me this far. 😀

    Samuel Vella (7/19/2012)


    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies.

    More's the pity (excuse my cynicism). 😉

    qh

    [font="Tahoma"]Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes. – Carl Jung.[/font]
  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7335

    quackhandle1975 (8/1/2014)


    Nice article John, thanks. I will say that that "two page maximum" can sometimes hinder yourself when you have been contracting for over ten years and have many clients. I like to add /remove clients depending on the role I go for. I haven't found using three pages being a hindrance so far.

    That's a good strategy and it takes into consideration the specific market that you're targeting. If it's working for you, keep at it!


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7335

    xsevensinzx (8/1/2014)


    For me, I worked in the video game industry for 7+ years. I also worked on the marketing side of things within technology. I used to keep it short and to the point. Something that was easy to read, yet communicated my skillset and what I had to offer to a potential organization.

    Unfortunately, in the technology world, sometimes that is not enough. I had many agencies tell me that more was better. That I should be listing out all the multi-million dollar projects that I worked on and include details on what I had to offer. On top of that, trashing that catch-all resume and tailor each resume specifically to the job you want.

    When I did that, I got hired. Since then, most agencies I've worked with ask for the same. They don't want simple easy resumes in my area because they are too vague. Technology specific hires are burning companies because they simply rushed the hiring process and really didn't know anything about the candidate they were bringing in.

    But, that could just be my area.

    This is a good philosophy. As you say, it's about establishing the right amount of detail to provide dependent on the market you're targeting , the level of the role (a SQL Server MCM should not be listing out they know how to perform backups and Index Maintenance, it's a given by that point) and your prior experience of what works for you.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • J-440512

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6285

    Two pages is now out of style. Large companies are now using an Applicant Tracking System. Incoming cv's are scanned by the ATS for the purpose of identifying the relevant cv's out of the lot. Most cv's will not be read by a human being.

    ATS simply rates the cv's based on key words.

    To clear ATS, a one-page cv is the norm.

    The ATS can even generate the polite "thank you for your interest in our company" rejection letter.

  • pmoseley

    SSC Journeyman

    Points: 85

    Nice article John. All excellent points but I specifically wanted to comment on relevancy. As you said people have a tendency to list every technology they have knowledge of and experience with. But as a person's experience and knowledge grow that can become a very long list. Potential employers don't want to have to sift through all that information to see if you have the skills they are looking for.

    A couple years ago when I was actively job searching I took the time to edit my resume for each and every job that I pursued to make sure the information I had in there was relevant to the job duties of the position. It took extra time and effort but it paid off.

    Patrick

  • cweber06492

    Grasshopper

    Points: 16

    I find that making a resume using a bullet list is very helpful, and in it I list every single problem/situation/project I came up against, what technologies I utilized, and the result (value) that was obtained. Then, I find a position I want to send the resume to, and exclude all the irrelevant information, tailoring the information to each position. I have a wide skill set that goes from U/I design to business object development to database design and development SSIS and SSRS. Putting all that on one resume when someone is just looking for a DBA would be not wise.

    (Nothing worse than hearing the old "We think you're a little over-qualified" when you are trying to keep the bills paid.) Just trim it down to the experience that is relevant to the position, and if you have any room, you can have a section to list "other skills".

  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7335

    J-440512 (8/1/2014)


    Two pages is now out of style. Large companies are now using an Applicant Tracking System. Incoming cv's are scanned by the ATS for the purpose of identifying the relevant cv's out of the lot. Most cv's will not be read by a human being.

    ATS simply rates the cv's based on key words.

    To clear ATS, a one-page cv is the norm.

    The ATS can even generate the polite "thank you for your interest in our company" rejection letter.

    Automating the hiring process? That "might" work for entry and lower level positions I suppose. Who are these large companies you speak of? Overall they sound like exactly the sort of short sighted organisations that quality Data Professionals do NOT want to be looking to work for.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • humbleDBA

    Hall of Fame

    Points: 3440

    quackhandle1975 (8/1/2014)


    ...

    Samuel Vella (7/19/2012)


    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies.

    More's the pity (excuse my cynicism). 😉

    qh

    Agreed - and cynicism that, I believe, may be well-founded.

    IMHO - 15 yrs as a UK permmy and contractor - Agencies just 'churn an burn', no proper vetting for their customers. I've even had it where the agency, who put me into a job with one of their customers, contacted me (unsolicited) 12 months later about another permmy job, trying to tempt me away from said customer. :crazy:

  • quackhandle1975

    SSChampion

    Points: 10963

    J-440512 (8/1/2014)


    Two pages is now out of style. Large companies are now using an Applicant Tracking System. Incoming cv's are scanned by the ATS for the purpose of identifying the relevant cv's out of the lot. Most cv's will not be read by a human being.

    ATS simply rates the cv's based on key words.

    To clear ATS, a one-page cv is the norm.

    The ATS can even generate the polite "thank you for your interest in our company" rejection letter.

    +1. This was one of the my reasons for doing the MCITP, I didn't have the correct buzzwords on my cv, so was getting passed by on gigs, + I wasn't the only one.

    qh

    [font="Tahoma"]Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes. – Carl Jung.[/font]
  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7335

    pmoseley (8/1/2014)


    Nice article John. All excellent points but I specifically wanted to comment on relevancy. As you said people have a tendency to list every technology they have knowledge of and experience with. But as a person's experience and knowledge grow that can become a very long list. Potential employers don't want to have to sift through all that information to see if you have the skills they are looking for.

    A couple years ago when I was actively job searching I took the time to edit my resume for each and every job that I pursued to make sure the information I had in there was relevant to the job duties of the position. It took extra time and effort but it paid off.

    Patrick

    Well played sir. It's an investment of time that pays dividends in the long run, that's for sure.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • lptech

    Hall of Fame

    Points: 3188

    Regarding the question of links to articles, etc., put those links in your LinkedIn profile, and put the profile in the top section of your resume.

  • brian.geregach

    SSC-Addicted

    Points: 406

    John,

    What about professionals that are changing their focus and don't have a lot or any experience.

    Thanks

    Brian

  • aochss

    SSCommitted

    Points: 1677

    All,

    A little off topic. A lot of the posts reference a CV instead of a resume. I assume the CV stands for curriculum vitae.

    I am curious, how did this come about? Has it always been referred to as a CV? Does anyone use the term "resume" in England?

    How is the document referenced when talking about your "resume"? Do you use the entire Latin Term or do you always say something like "CEE VEE"?

    It is interesting the difference between American and British English. Heck, we are using word with French origins for our experience documents.

    The differences between us is what makes this all worth while.

    Thanks,

    Anton

  • quackhandle1975

    SSChampion

    Points: 10963

    aochss (8/1/2014)


    All,

    A little off topic. A lot of the posts reference a CV instead of a resume. I assume the CV stands for curriculum vitae.

    I am curious, how did this come about? Has it always been referred to as a CV? Does anyone use the term "resume" in England?

    How is the document referenced when talking about your "resume"? Do you use the entire Latin Term or do you always say something like "CEE VEE"?

    It is interesting the difference between American and British English. Heck, we are using word with French origins for our experience documents.

    The differences between us is what makes this all worth while.

    Thanks,

    Anton

    Here.

    qh

    [font="Tahoma"]Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes. – Carl Jung.[/font]

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