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Disabling the Named Pipe Protocol in SQL Server


Disabling the Named Pipe Protocol in SQL Server

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MyDoggieJessie
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Would there be any performance benefit to disabling the Shared Memory Protocol?

We have a server that executes some rather large queries then pulls the data back to it via a linked server (I know, not such a good idea but that's what we're stuck with). This process has run fairly well for years but as of a few days ago became "extremely slow"...my gut feeling tells me we've just hit a tipping point in the sheer volume of data we're querying, then pulling back through the pipe.

I've read a bit online about the different types of protocols but am unclear if there's any performance boost to changing anything.

Any thoughts?

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SQLRNNR
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MyDoggieJessie (4/6/2011)
Would there be any performance benefit to disabling the Shared Memory Protocol?

We have a server that executes some rather large queries then pulls the data back to it via a linked server (I know, not such a good idea but that's what we're stuck with). This process has run fairly well for years but as of a few days ago became "extremely slow"...my gut feeling tells me we've just hit a tipping point in the sheer volume of data we're querying, then pulling back through the pipe.

I've read a bit online about the different types of protocols but am unclear if there's any performance boost to changing anything.

Any thoughts?


I don't think it will have an impact. This is a protocol and you were seeing memory pressure according to the waits if memory serves correctly.



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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rook372000
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Lowell (9/20/2010)
Ratheesh.K.Nair (9/19/2010)
The application wont connect to database...

For remote connection you should enable both TCP\IP and NAMED PIPES


i don't think that is true; SQL will simply use only the TCP/IP instead; disabling Named Pipes does not shut down the server or anything drastic like that;
TCP/IP is a little less chatty, but more prone to DNS errors; SQL by default gives priority to named pipe connections over TCP/IP.
take a look at this thread on the issue not too long ago; it's pretty well covered int he two pages:
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic674071-146-1.aspx#bm674150


--edit: i disabled mine as proof of concept; i can connect via my localhost website, via an application, and SSMS and Linqpad, all with no problem, even tho its now disabled; i stopped and started the service as well to be sure the settings were changed.




Hi

I am an IT auditor and working on my first SQL server audit. One of my audit tests is to Verify that the Named Pipes protocol is disabled, unless there is a documented justification. My contact person told me “I disabled the Named Pipes in the SQL Native Client Config (Prod Server) but could not do so in the test and dev servers; it kept changing back to “Enabled”.”

When I followed up he told me "Given that we are not running multiple instances of SQL server on the same hardware, Names Pipes does not come into play. In other words, for the SQL Server configurations, Named Pipes does not pertain, regardless of these Named Pipe settings."

Does this sound reasonable to you SQL experts?
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