SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Learning Oracle


Learning Oracle

Author
Message
ta.bu.shi.da.yu
ta.bu.shi.da.yu
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 437 Visits: 494
Lynn Pettis (10/13/2010)
harrifolfenced (10/13/2010)
what are advantages of oracle over sql


In my opinion, nothing. Both serve a purpose and can do the job.

In the short time I have had with Oracle, however, I definately prefer MS SQL Server. I could be biasedn howevern having worked with SQL Server for 12+ years and Oracle only a couple of weeks.


But there must be something that makes you say that... what in particular struck you?

Random Technical Stuff
Eric M Russell
Eric M Russell
SSChampion
SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 12934 Visits: 10696
harrifolfenced (10/13/2010)
what are advantages of oracle over sql

SQL Server is to Windows what Oracle is to Unix. Oracle has been around since the 70s or early 80s, and it carries a lot of legacy pre-ANSI SQL baggage. There is a much larger body of proprietary knowledge to learn, a lot more switches to tweak, and the impression I get is that there are more Oracle developers but fewer Oracle experts.
On the other hand, SQL Server is newer and will deprecate features that become obsolete (a good thing in my opinion), making it a much cleaner and easier to learn. Go to Barnes & Noble or Borders, browse the books on Oracle 11g and SQL Server 2008, then decide for yourself which speaks to you.


"The universe is complicated and for the most part beyond your control, but your life is only as complicated as you choose it to be."
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 5655 Visits: 4639
harrifolfenced (10/13/2010)
what are advantages of oracle over sql

Let me point to just two differences that some people may construct as Oracle advantages.

Oracle runs on multiple O/S
SQL Server runs only on top of WinTel while Oracle would run even in a blender if you can put on it anyone of a wide variety of O/S including but not limited to Windows, Unix, HP-UX, IBM-AIX, Linux, Solaris, etc.

Oracle RAC
Oracle RAC is a functional, reliable high-availability solution. There is nothing like Oracle RAC in SQL Server

Hope this helps.

_____________________________________
Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

Author of Understanding Database Administration available at Amazon and other bookstores.

Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 5655 Visits: 4639
Eric Russell 13013 (10/13/2010)
On the other hand, SQL Server is newer ...

Always remember SQL Server carries Sybase genes; don't look at SQL Server 4.0 as SQL Server date of birth ;-)

_____________________________________
Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

Author of Understanding Database Administration available at Amazon and other bookstores.

Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.
Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)SSC-Forever (41K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 41478 Visits: 38567
In my opinion, both Oracle and SQL Server have their place. What I have seen, however, is that the decision to use one over the other is usually dictated by "politics" more than what is the best tool for a particular application or environment. It seems to me that SQL Server can handle many of the environments that Oracle is used and do so at a lower cost. I have seen that Oracle has reduced licensing costs over the past 10 years, but SQL Server still costs less and provides more out of the box.

That said, there will still be places where Oracle may make better sense, such as where RAC is needed.
Bottom line, use the tool that makes sense technically and fiscally, not just politically.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
PaulB-TheOneAndOnly
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.7K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 5655 Visits: 4639
Lynn Pettis (10/13/2010)
In my opinion, both Oracle and SQL Server have their place. What I have seen, however, is that the decision to use one over the other is usually dictated by "politics" more than what is the best tool for a particular application or environment. It seems to me that SQL Server can handle many of the environments that Oracle is used and do so at a lower cost.


I couldn't agree more.

_____________________________________
Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

Author of Understanding Database Administration available at Amazon and other bookstores.

Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)SSC Guru (91K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 91186 Visits: 41151
ta.bu.shi.da.yu (9/17/2010)
2. Oracle has implemented more of the SQL standard that Microsoft. Case in point: try doing a lag, lead, or top analytic function in SQL Server... you can't! You can only use rank, denserank, and row_number. If you were able to use lag(column) over () then I'm almost certain we wouldn't need to be using non-supported clustered index approaches to running total aggregates... though we wouldn't have had one of the coolest articles around on this approach, of course :-)


Heh... thanks for that. As a side bar, there is a super fast way to guarantee either that the running total worked or get a notification that it didn't that Paul White and Tom Thompson came up with. That's a good thing because just before that, Wayne S. was the first and only person I've ever met that broke a previously good running example. I'm thinking I need to update the article (hopefully) one more time and then maybe retire. :-P

Shifting gears, I wouldn't necessarily say that Oracle is ahead of the game for SQL standards. The last time I looked, Oracle had nothing with DATEDIFF, DATEADD, etc, etc and, IIRC, those are part of the SQL standards.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
nick.mcdermaid
nick.mcdermaid
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)SSC-Addicted (408 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 408 Visits: 778
Here are my thoughts after going from many years SQL Server to an extended project in Oracle:

I certainly found a lot of things in Oracle quite 'alien' to me and was initially very resistant and cynical.(particularly having to use a third party tool to develop - TOAD which I think has a user interface like a car accident).

The poster who mentioned that Oracle has loads of baggage is really on the money. MS can now sit back and emulate all the good parts of Oracle without having to take on the baggage!

I'm impressed with Oracle packages as they almost seem like classes to me
-Variables which 'reflect' existing table meta data
-Custom data types
-Multiple 'methods' within the package all returning different types

So you can truly wrap up a large piece of logic in a package which has various methods which can be called.

The other thing that impresses me is the optimiser and the way it can decompose multiple levels of views. You can define many layers of views to contain your business logic and usually be happy that it will still perform. Back in SQL 2000 I tried doing this and it appeared to be effectively materialising the data at each level rather than doing any smart 'rewriting' - maybe things have changed by SQL 2008 though.


In summary, you'd be well served to jump the hurdle and get some experience to make an informed judgement about the two different platforms.

PS at a current client we indeed have what seems to be a political decision to move from Oracle to SQL Server.
ta.bu.shi.da.yu
ta.bu.shi.da.yu
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)SSC-Addicted (437 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 437 Visits: 494
Jeff Moden (10/13/2010)
ta.bu.shi.da.yu (9/17/2010)
2. Oracle has implemented more of the SQL standard that Microsoft. Case in point: try doing a lag, lead, or top analytic function in SQL Server... you can't! You can only use rank, denserank, and row_number. If you were able to use lag(column) over () then I'm almost certain we wouldn't need to be using non-supported clustered index approaches to running total aggregates... though we wouldn't have had one of the coolest articles around on this approach, of course :-)


Heh... thanks for that. As a side bar, there is a super fast way to guarantee either that the running total worked or get a notification that it didn't that Paul White and Tom Thompson came up with. That's a good thing because just before that, Wayne S. was the first and only person I've ever met that broke a previously good running example. I'm thinking I need to update the article (hopefully) one more time and then maybe retire. :-P

Shifting gears, I wouldn't necessarily say that Oracle is ahead of the game for SQL standards. The last time I looked, Oracle had nothing with DATEDIFF, DATEADD, etc, etc and, IIRC, those are part of the SQL standards.


Really? OK, that surprises me... good pickup! As far as I'm aware, Oracle doesn't have a Connect like Microsoft does, so I guess there's no way of providing feedback!

Random Technical Stuff
WayneS
WayneS
SSChampion
SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 10308 Visits: 10575
If you look at these two posts, especially the signature, and that these are the only posts ever from this poster, they feel more like spam for their kitchen cabinets.

harrifolfenced (10/13/2010)
what are advantages of oracle over sql
harrifolfenced (10/13/2010)
thanks for above links i also solved my stored procedure code


Wayne
Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server 2008
Author - SQL Server T-SQL Recipes
If you can't explain to another person how the code that you're copying from the internet works, then DON'T USE IT on a production system! After all, you will be the one supporting it!
Links: For better assistance in answering your questions, How to ask a question, Performance Problems, Common date/time routines,
CROSS-TABS and PIVOT tables Part 1 & Part 2, Using APPLY Part 1 & Part 2, Splitting Delimited Strings

Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search