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Finding Unique Non-Repeating Random Numbers


Finding Unique Non-Repeating Random Numbers

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James Goodwin
James Goodwin
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wppatton,
I'm not going to give you the answer because that looks way too much like a homework problem. I will give you a fairly broad hint however--The mod operator returns the remainder of an integer division.
--
JimFive
jcrawf02
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Great article Brandie, like how you offered multiple solutions and showed how you worked through them.

Jeff likes to use ABS(CHECKSUM(NEWID())) to generate random numbers, I haven't done any testing on it like you did, so don't know if it has issues with repetition or not. I've been treating it like it doesn't for non-critical use, suppose I should check that.;-)

See http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic666309-338-1.aspx for an example of his use.

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James Goodwin
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As AndyC mentions this is not a random set.

However, for this case you don't need a random set, you need an arbitrary set of numbers. (More accurately, you need an arbitrary set that is easy to generate and impossible to reverse.) One way to achieve this would be to use RANK over the TaxID and then pad them out to the proper length. For nonnumeric data I would look at using CHECKSUM.
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JimFive
AndyC London
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James Goodwin (8/12/2010)
As AndyC mentions this is not a random set.

However, for this case you don't need a random set, you need an arbitrary set of numbers. (More accurately, you need an arbitrary set that is easy to generate and impossible to reverse.) One way to achieve this would be to use RANK over the TaxID and then pad them out to the proper length. For nonnumeric data I would look at using CHECKSUM.
--
JimFive


Good point Jim, I actually had the opposite problem when generating person name test data in that everyone had a unique surnames where more typical would be that several people have the same name e.g. Smith and some surnames have just one person. Same principle goes for dates of birth
wppatton
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Jim,

It's not even close to being a homework problem. I wouldn't post homework for someone else to do. It's real world problem being brought to me by a business associate.
AndyC London
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Sounds a bit like a Sudoku puzzle, there might be similar techniques you could use

http://www.vsj.co.uk/articles/display.asp?id=540
Brandie Tarvin
Brandie Tarvin
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wppatton (8/12/2010)
Jim,

It's not even close to being a homework problem. I wouldn't post homework for someone else to do. It's real world problem being brought to me by a business associate.


Post the table structure and data samples in the T-SQL forums and then PM me the link. I'll take a look at it and I'm sure a lot of other people will too.

Brandie Tarvin, MCITP Database AdministratorLiveJournal Blog: http://brandietarvin.livejournal.com/On LinkedIn!, Google+, and Twitter.Freelance Writer: ShadowrunLatchkeys: Nevermore, Latchkeys: The Bootleg War, and Latchkeys: Roscoes in the Night are now available on Nook and Kindle.
Eric M Russell
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A little off topic maybe, but below is a possible technique to hash demographic or personally identifying data for a QA or Development environment. The distribution of the data remains basically the same as the original. Please note that this is something I hacked together in a few minutes, and I've never actually used this professionally. Also, the performance would suck unless customer name and birth_date are both indexed.


declare @customer table
(
customer_id int not null,
first_name varchar(40) not null,
last_name varchar(40) not null,
birth_date smalldatetime not null
);

insert into @customer (customer_id, first_name, last_name, birth_date)
select 1, 'Beverly','Johnson','1970/04/01' union all
select 2, 'Mark','Johnson','1972/03/10' union all
select 3, 'Mark','Johnson','1972/10/03' union all
select 4, 'Scott','Lemon','1982/01/04' union all
select 5, 'Michelle','Snow','1958/10/24' union all
select 6, 'Scott','Richards','1958/10/24';

select
customer_id,
left(first_name,1)+cast( (select count(*) from @customer b where b.first_name > a.first_name) as varchar(9) ) first_name,
left(last_name,1)+cast( (select count(*) from @customer b where b.last_name > a.last_name) as varchar(9) ) last_name,
dateadd( day, (select count(*) from @customer b where b.birth_date > a.birth_date), birth_date ) birth_date
from
@customer a
order by
customer_id;




customer_id first_name last_name birth_date
----------- ---------- ---------- -----------------------
1 B5 J3 1970-04-04 00:00:00
2 M3 J3 1972-03-12 00:00:00
3 M3 J3 1972-10-04 00:00:00
4 S0 L2 1982-01-04 00:00:00
5 M2 S0 1958-10-28 00:00:00
6 S0 R1 1958-10-28 00:00:00



"The universe is complicated and for the most part beyond your control, but your life is only as complicated as you choose it to be."
magarity kerns
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I understand random numbers for some cases but it seems strange here. If the purpose is to encrypt real EINs then one of the built in encryption routines would be a lot easier. If the purpose is to just a placeholder then why not just a simple integer counter; how is 1,2,3 less secure by obfuscation than random numbers?

PS - The guy with the table arrangement problem sounded at first like a contrived homework problem but then I thought he's probably trying to set up a dating websites and needs a process to prearrange the seating at a group meet&greet so don't go too harsh on him.
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