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Does a development DBA need to learn dot.net language. ?


Does a development DBA need to learn dot.net language. ?

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Joy Smith San
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Dear All,

I have a doubt.
Does a DBA need to learn dot.net language. ?


Thanks.
Henrico Bekker
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Any extra knowledge is always a bonus, and learning .NET will increase your chances of understanding how applications use SQL as a back-end.

I have seen many job requirements for SQL Dev's, who actually require them to know a bit of .NET, but not always a fixed requirement.

Knowing .NET will seperate you from a normal SQL Developer, and it wont hurt knowing the other side....
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It depends on whether you need to or not.

Will it be beneficial - sure.

You can apply what you learn in .Net to CLR procedures and to SSIS packages. Both can be quite beneficial for the development dba.



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Joy Smith San
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Thanks for the quick respose, You are right.
But, has it become essential now a days .?....
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I can tell you that a bare minimum ability to understand at a basic level is necessary. Being able to look at .Net code and understand what it is trying to accomplish is necessary. That doesn't mean you have to be know it perfectly - but be able to follow the logic and understand what is happening inside the code.



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Henrico Bekker
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Personally, I want to say yes, but it depends on where you want to go with SQL development, maybe into BI? then, YES.
Also depends on the needs of te current employer, and future developments.

Do it for yourself, you might need it one day.
;-)
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Henrico Bekker (3/4/2010)
Personally, I want to say yes, but it depends on where you want to go with SQL development, maybe into BI? then, YES.
Also depends on the needs of te current employer, and future developments.

Do it for yourself, you might need it one day.
;-)


Sound advice



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Yes, but you have to know when to use SQL and when to use .net.
SQL is still the language of choice for set based operations while
.net is useful for things you cannot accomplish easily with SQL. For example I have found .net to be invaluable in SSIS when you want to call external dlls.

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RBarryYoung
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That depends. Do you want to be able to read the SQL CLR assemblies that the developers are going to want to put on your databases or not? Personally, I would want to, but that's just me. :-)

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Elliott Whitlow
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Yes, you should, even if it is just being able to read it and understand what is happening. There are several languages I don't even have basic coding skills in but I can read them and get 98% of what is happening, the other 2% is the nuances, which a good coder should have noted in comments.

It never hurts to know it. For SSIS there are some things that are not easily accomplished with the available tools and in general I don't like to use 3rd-party tools unless they are really necessary. I absolutely want to be able to read any SQLCLR code that comes my way, if for no other reason to quiz my developers why they didn't use T-SQL for this or that function..

CEWII
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