SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Measures and Rules


Measures and Rules

Author
Message
Grant Fritchey
Grant Fritchey
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 72943 Visits: 32912
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Measures and Rules

----------------------------------------------------
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...
Theodore Roosevelt

The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server Query Performance Tuning and SQL Server Execution Plans
Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Tobar
Tobar
SSC Eights!
SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)SSC Eights! (827 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 827 Visits: 758
Great Article.

Each person must assess their own needs and responses when considering "cookie cutter" numbers. As much as we would like to believe, we are not a one size fits all creature. But we like to think that way. The human body is infinitely more complex than a database, but the same rule applies. Too often after implementing a cookie cutter number, people/DBAs only question the number if things go badly, and there is nothing wrong with that, but that doesn't mean it is the wrong number for everybody else. We hope that the "experts" know what they are talking about, and mostly they do. That is not to say that through research you can not come up with a better number for the situations you are in.

<><
Livin' down on the cube farm. Left, left, then a right.
jay-h
jay-h
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 3014 Visits: 2353
It's interesting (and common) that the diatribe against the original article is turned into a gender flame war.

The initial point of Paulos argument (and indeed some of his excellent books) is how misleading our gut instincts can be about statistics (leave it to that commenter to decide that he is derogoagory toward women).

This same kind of discussion has occurred in other areas of medical screening too (hint: similar advice was given for other non gender related diseases as well), and in our "precautionary prinicple" driven society, the gut reaction is often wrong, and sometimes counter productive.

When it comes to understanding the nuances of statistics, should I listen to a top mathematician in the field or a law professor... hmmm which to choose?

...

-- FORTRAN manual for Xerox Computers --
Grant Fritchey
Grant Fritchey
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 72943 Visits: 32912
Tobar (2/8/2010)
Great Article.

Each person must assess their own needs and responses when considering "cookie cutter" numbers. As much as we would like to believe, we are not a one size fits all creature. But we like to think that way. The human body is infinitely more complex than a database, but the same rule applies. Too often after implementing a cookie cutter number, people/DBAs only question the number if things go badly, and there is nothing wrong with that, but that doesn't mean it is the wrong number for everybody else. We hope that the "experts" know what they are talking about, and mostly they do. That is not to say that through research you can not come up with a better number for the situations you are in.


Thanks, and I agree with you. If you really dig, probably, each and every measurement is unique to a given situation, but the variation may be very slight, so does it matter that your disk queue length is 4.5 or 5 before you start get a little concerned? But sometimes, those measurements can vary wildly from one situationn to another. The more you know, the better you'll be able to understand if the measurement applies in your situation. The problem is, there's a lot to know.

----------------------------------------------------
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...
Theodore Roosevelt

The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server Query Performance Tuning and SQL Server Execution Plans
Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Andy Leonard
Andy Leonard
SSCommitted
SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1770 Visits: 1101
Great editorial Grant!

This reminded me of the demise of my checklist. I used to think database tuning was a matter of checking off items on my checklist, in order, as I made corrections. I believed this until some of my changes took a server to its knees.

Investigation revealed the checklist wasn't the problem - my faith in it was the problem.

I'd built the checklist from experience. I went back to that experience and instead documented the methodology I'd used to gather measurements and create tests. This methodology replaced my checklist.

:{> Andy

Andy Leonard
Data Philosopher, Enterprise Data & Analytics
Grant Fritchey
Grant Fritchey
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)SSC Guru (72K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 72943 Visits: 32912
Andy Leonard (2/8/2010)
Great editorial Grant!

This reminded me of the demise of my checklist. I used to think database tuning was a matter of checking off items on my checklist, in order, as I made corrections. I believed this until some of my changes took a server to its knees.

Investigation revealed the checklist wasn't the problem - my faith in it was the problem.

I'd built the checklist from experience. I went back to that experience and instead documented the methodology I'd used to gather measurements and create tests. This methodology replaced my checklist.

:{> Andy


Now that sounds like a great presentation. When are you giving it?

----------------------------------------------------
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...
Theodore Roosevelt

The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server Query Performance Tuning and SQL Server Execution Plans
Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Andy Leonard
Andy Leonard
SSCommitted
SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)SSCommitted (1.8K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1770 Visits: 1101
Grant Fritchey (2/8/2010)

Now that sounds like a great presentation. When are you giving it?


I love you man!

:{>

Andy Leonard
Data Philosopher, Enterprise Data & Analytics
GSquared
GSquared
SSC-Dedicated
SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (39K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 39797 Visits: 9730
Standard measures and rules of that sort are of incredible value (in most cases) to people who are first learning a subject. Once one really knows the subject and understands it, one can violate the "rules", because one understands enough to do so in a positive way.

- Gus "GSquared", RSVP, OODA, MAP, NMVP, FAQ, SAT, SQL, DNA, RNA, UOI, IOU, AM, PM, AD, BC, BCE, USA, UN, CF, ROFL, LOL, ETC
Property of The Thread

"Nobody knows the age of the human race, but everyone agrees it's old enough to know better." - Anon
SQLRNNR
SQLRNNR
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)SSC-Forever (49K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 49805 Visits: 18570
Great Editorial. You bring up a very simple point that we try to make daily. There are measures out there that are guides. The guide is a starting point and you must test to find what works best in your environment. That too may change over time - so as Andy said - it is really the methodology that one needs to implement to make sure the measures and guides established for their environment are correct.



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
I have given a name to my pain...
MCM SQL Server, MVP


SQL RNNR

Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw

Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search