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SQLRNNR
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Steve Jones - Editor (1/7/2010)
I see both sides in this argument. BOL is inconsistent and I have added feedback to that note to various links to have this clarified at the source we use. When I got the QOD and followed the link, Predicate seemed correct. However the more I look at the wording, I can see where operator is a valid argument. My first thought was operator as well, but then I thought it's in the WHERE clause, so predicate made sense.

I have changed the question to include "in (z, y, z, ...)" as the "what is this" portion, which should clear up confusion as to this being a predicate.

I will award back all points to date to people once my password gets reset Smile Forgot it over the holidays. Hehe


Thanks Steve.



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Jeff Cook-476310
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Now it's even more confusing - the question has changed; the answer has changed from predicate to operator which I don't think is correct with the new question; and, the explanation still lists predicate as the correct answer!
Steve Jones
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the answer is predicate. It has not changed. The change from

"IN"

to

"columnX IN (x, y, z, ...)"

Makes it a predicate.

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Jeff Cook-476310
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I'm not sure what is going on but when I went to http://www.sqlservercentral.com/questions/T-SQL/68500/
and answered predicate (to the revised question), the site said:
Sorry - you were wrong

Correct answer: Operator
Explanation: In T-SQL, a PREDICATE allows you to check whether a value or scalar expression evaluates to TRUE, FALSE, or UNKNOWN. The IN clause, with column and values becomes a predicate and checks to see if at least one of the elements in a set is equal to a given value or expression.

T-SQL PREDICATE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189523%28SQL.90%29.aspx
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Tom Garth
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Steve Jones - Editor (1/7/2010)
the answer is predicate. It has not changed. The change from

"IN"

to

"columnX IN (x, y, z, ...)"

Makes it a predicate.


Maybe you should check it again Steve. I checked Predicate less than 10 minutes ago and got it wrong.

Tom Garth
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Jeff Cook-476310 (1/7/2010)
I'm not sure what is going on but when I went to http://www.sqlservercentral.com/questions/T-SQL/68500/
and answered predicate (to the revised question), the site said:
Sorry - you were wrong

Correct answer: Operator
Explanation: In T-SQL, a PREDICATE allows you to check whether a value or scalar expression evaluates to TRUE, FALSE, or UNKNOWN. The IN clause, with column and values becomes a predicate and checks to see if at least one of the elements in a set is equal to a given value or expression.

T-SQL PREDICATE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189523%28SQL.90%29.aspx
Join the discussion about this question
Contribute a question of your own


Ditto - I chose predicate. Even more confusing when I was reading through the comments (thinking "but IN isn't by itself - the whole statement will resolve to TRUE, FALSE or UNKNOWN") until I got to this post and realised the question had been altered - although not the answer it would appear.



Scott Duncan

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Rick Townsend
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Scott Duncan-251680 (1/7/2010)
Jeff Cook-476310 (1/7/2010)
I'm not sure what is going on but when I went to http://www.sqlservercentral.com/questions/T-SQL/68500/
and answered predicate (to the revised question), the site said:
Sorry - you were wrong

Correct answer: Operator
Explanation: In T-SQL, a PREDICATE allows you to check whether a value or scalar expression evaluates to TRUE, FALSE, or UNKNOWN. The IN clause, with column and values becomes a predicate and checks to see if at least one of the elements in a set is equal to a given value or expression.

T-SQL PREDICATE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189523%28SQL.90%29.aspx
Join the discussion about this question
Contribute a question of your own


Ditto - I chose predicate. Even more confusing when I was reading through the comments (thinking "but IN isn't by itself - the whole statement will resolve to TRUE, FALSE or UNKNOWN") until I got to this post and realised the question had been altered - although not the answer it would appear.



Same here - was a bit surprised to see Operator as the correct answer when it seemed Predicate was right. Then to be told in the explanation that predicate is correct left me completely confused. Glad to see that I'm not the only one!




Rick
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In light of all the confusion, I respectfully apologize to everyone for not making the question more clear in the first place.Blush
Steve Jones
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Doh! It's fixed. I must have made a mistake when I changed the question.

It now shows predicate as the answer. I'll fix points.

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SSSolice
In light of all the confusion, I respectfully apologize to everyone for not making the question more clear in the first place.


1. Do NOT take the belittling comments to heart
2. Do NOT feel bad
3 Do NOT stop submitting QODs...

Goodness knows I have been banged from pillar to post, hopefully you will have learned from this, (I take it this was your first QOD), and your next attempt will be composed keeping in mind all the nit picking that it might be subjected to.

If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.

Ron

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