Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 2 - Dynamic Cross Tabs


Cross Tabs and Pivots, Part 2 - Dynamic Cross Tabs

Author
Message
ChrisM@Work
ChrisM@Work
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 8923 Visits: 19005
Top work, Jeff. You have a rare talent for mixing informal narrative with a technically challenging subject - and with ruthless precision Cool

Cheers

ChrisM

“Write the query the simplest way. If through testing it becomes clear that the performance is inadequate, consider alternative query forms.” - Gail Shaw

For fast, accurate and documented assistance in answering your questions, please read this article.
Understanding and using APPLY, (I) and (II) Paul White
Hidden RBAR: Triangular Joins / The "Numbers" or "Tally" Table: What it is and how it replaces a loop Jeff Moden
Exploring Recursive CTEs by Example Dwain Camps
mtassin
mtassin
SSCarpal Tunnel
SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 4093 Visits: 72512
That was just an amazing read... learned some neat tricks that I didn't even think were possible (but in retrospect should have known)... very informative...



--Mark Tassin
MCITP - SQL Server DBA
Proud member of the Anti-RBAR alliance.
For help with Performance click this link
For tips on how to post your problems
mlandry
mlandry
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 6 Visits: 21
Jeff,

Whoa, using SQL to do cross-tabs really is "old school" (circa mid-90's or before.) It just wasn't designed for this.

Do yourself a BIG favor and try Analysis Services. The MDX language is everything the SQL "select-groupby" ever wanted to be when it grew up. And it's far more expressive in terms of business reporting than SQL will ever be.

Mark Landry
Tampa, FL
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 44794 Visits: 39845
mlandry (12/3/2008)
Jeff,

Whoa, using SQL to do cross-tabs really is "old school" (circa mid-90's or before.) It just wasn't designed for this.

Do yourself a BIG favor and try Analysis Services. The MDX language is everything the SQL "select-groupby" ever wanted to be when it grew up. And it's far more expressive in terms of business reporting than SQL will ever be.

Mark Landry
Tampa, FL


Thanks, Mark... yep... I absolutely agree with everything you said. But, it is a bit more difficult to setup Analysis Services and learn the MDX language than it is to learn how to do a simple cross-tab. Lot's of folks/shops just won't go through it. Not saying that's right or wrong, but simply a fact based on the number of requests for help on cross-tabs on these forums in the last 12 months or so. I figured that if they're going to write a cross tab, they might as well learn how to do it without a cursor or While loop. Smile

It just wasn't designed for this.


Heh... T-SQL wasn't designed for most of what I do with it... Tongue

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
     Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is usually not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
mtassin
mtassin
SSCarpal Tunnel
SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 4093 Visits: 72512
My favorite way to do cross-tabs is to cheat..

Put the data into a cross tab friend format (measures and values to break it out by)

and feed it into crystal reports.



--Mark Tassin
MCITP - SQL Server DBA
Proud member of the Anti-RBAR alliance.
For help with Performance click this link
For tips on how to post your problems
DPhillips-731960
DPhillips-731960
Ten Centuries
Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1158 Visits: 801
Thank you for your efforts here Jeff. An article of this level takes hours to prepare, and the effort shows. Although I am an Analysis Server and Report Server convert, I still think this kind of TSQL workup is useful for instruction on many levels, and is the type of project that demonstrates to the less informed that server-side TSQL is far more than just CRUD (A.K.A. READ or SUID). I love dynamic code projects. I dislike static hard-coded unyeiding inflexible and dead-when-deployed code.

You are very spot-on when you say TSQL allows you to do many things not originally designed (but powerful and useful just the same).
WayneS
WayneS
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.2K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 6220 Visits: 10398
Jeff Moden (12/3/2008)
Heh... T-SQL wasn't designed for most of what I do with it... Tongue

Isn't that the truth.
Fantastic article! Thanks!
Wayne

Wayne
Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server 2008
Author - SQL Server T-SQL Recipes
If you can't explain to another person how the code that you're copying from the internet works, then DON'T USE IT on a production system! After all, you will be the one supporting it!
Links: For better assistance in answering your questions, How to ask a question, Performance Problems, Common date/time routines,
CROSS-TABS and PIVOT tables Part 1 & Part 2, Using APPLY Part 1 & Part 2, Splitting Delimited Strings

jcraddock
jcraddock
SSC-Enthusiastic
SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (106 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 106 Visits: 99
I've had better luck writing code that writes my SQL. I wrote a set of code that you point at any table, it accepts any column within the table as the top or left portion of the crosstab and any numeric column as the data portion. Another option is to calculate as percent of the whole or sum or count.

Doing it that way, you have one set of reusable code for all crosstabs...works pretty well. I usually just create a simple view, point the object at the view and Voila have instant reconfigurable, groupable by anything crosstab. I even added an option to subgroup on the left side.

Same concept, more code up front, but infinitely reusable.



RBarryYoung
RBarryYoung
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9432 Visits: 9517
Great article, Jeff. Like The Return of the King, it was well worth the wait!
Smile

-- RBarryYoung, (302)375-0451 blog: MovingSQL.com, Twitter: @RBarryYoung
Proactive Performance Solutions, Inc.
"Performance is our middle name."
RBarryYoung
RBarryYoung
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9432 Visits: 9517
mlandry (12/3/2008)
Whoa, using SQL to do cross-tabs really is "old school" (circa mid-90's or before.) It just wasn't designed for this.

Do yourself a BIG favor and try Analysis Services. The MDX language is everything the SQL "select-groupby" ever wanted to be when it grew up. And it's far more expressive in terms of business reporting than SQL will ever be.


I am sure that a similar article on how to use Analysis Services/MDX to do this for those of us who are T-SQL wonks only, would be very well received.

-- RBarryYoung, (302)375-0451 blog: MovingSQL.com, Twitter: @RBarryYoung
Proactive Performance Solutions, Inc.
"Performance is our middle name."
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search