SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


SQL Server Developer vs Enterprise vs Standard Editions


SQL Server Developer vs Enterprise vs Standard Editions

Author
Message
Jason Gutcher
Jason Gutcher
Grasshopper
Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)Grasshopper (23 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 23 Visits: 1

All,

I have a couple of questions about SQL Server 2000 editions.

1) I have a dual processor development db server with SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition installed. It seems SQL Server does not utilize both processors. Is it possible for the developer version to utilize more than one CPU?

2) Is the Developer Edition of SQL Server 2000 equivalent to the Enterprise Edition or the Standard Edition? What is the main difference between the Standard Edition and the Enterprise Edition (other than price!)?

Any help on these questions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Jason


philcart
philcart
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9885 Visits: 1441

SQL Server Developer Edition is equivalent to Enterprise Edition.

For details on the different editions take a look at this document from the resource kit,
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinfo/planning/SQLReskChooseEd.asp



Hope this helps
Phill Carter
--------------------
Colt 45 - the original point and click interface

Australian SQL Server User Groups - My profile
Phills Philosophies
Murrumbeena Cricket Club
Helen-84411
Helen-84411
SSC Eights!
SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)SSC Eights! (822 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 822 Visits: 29

Hai,

By default, SQL Server 7.0 and 2000 are set to use "Use All Available CPUs" on a server. If this is not your current setting, then this has been changed by someone.

Essentially, this setting tells SQL Server whether or not to try and attempt to execute queries in parallel using multiple processors. If the default "Use All Available CPUs" option is selected, then SQL Server will attempt to run queries in parallel, using multiple CPUs. This can sometimes result in dramatic performance differences in a query's performance. But if this option is turned off, then SQL Server will only use one CPU to execute a query, which can be much slower.

Keep in mind that if SQL Server is set to use parallelism, that it may not always use it. If the server is very busy, it may not be used, but when the server is less busy, it may be used. This means that sometimes the view will be fast, and other times, slow (depending if parallelism is being used or not).

Also, be sure that you have the latest Service Pack on your SQL Server




Helen
--------------------------------
Are you a born again. He is Jehova Jirah unto me
ROBERT WALLACE
ROBERT WALLACE
SSC Rookie
SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)SSC Rookie (36 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 36 Visits: 222
I have sql 7 dev. edition and also have never seen both processors used...
All settings have both processors turned on.
If anybody has the answer I would shure appreciate it..
Have wanted an answer to this question for a long time..
I see nothing from Microsoft about this limitation..
philcart
philcart
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (9.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9885 Visits: 1441

As Helen mentioned, just because you have two CPU doesn't mean that they will be used by SQL Server every time. If the DB engine determines that it can accomplish the task using one CPU, then there's no need for it to split the task across the two CPUs.

One thing you might try is to run a union query on one of the larger tables in the database. Generally the query optimiser will split the union into to seperate queries that run on each CPU.



Hope this helps
Phill Carter
--------------------
Colt 45 - the original point and click interface

Australian SQL Server User Groups - My profile
Phills Philosophies
Murrumbeena Cricket Club
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search