SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Importing Poorly Formatted Text File


Importing Poorly Formatted Text File

Author
Message
Ed Wagner
Ed Wagner
SSCoach
SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 16774 Visits: 10084
Jeff Moden (7/17/2014)
Ok. Here we go. Time for some good ol' fashioned "Black Arts". :-)

The first thing is, is to understand the true nature of the data-file example that was posted. I did that by "quoting the post" that had the example and some remarkable stuff showed up that the HTML rendering on this site was hiding. There's a ton of leading and embedded spaces. Here's what the file data really looks like...


REQ que stn all

STN
DN 326 0000
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01
OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC
CFAN

STN
DN 326 0001
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02
OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB
CFD VM ENQC

STN
DN 326 0003
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD

STN
DN 326 0004
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD



The blank line actually contain 4 spaces. To help us see the spaces, I changed them all to a dash so they're easier to see.


REQ---que-stn-all
----
----STN
----DN---326-0000
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-01-
----OPT--CFW-1MR-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-NACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-CFB-CFD-ENQC-
---------CFAN-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0001
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-02-
----OPT--SUS-CFW-1MR-CWT-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-3261281-ACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-!ECO-!RIT-!124-CFB-
---------CFD-VM-ENQC-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0003
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-16-14-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!TKD-CFB-CFD-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0004
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-19-20-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!LOC-CFB-CFD



That's almost a fixed field format. In fact, the data to the right of what I'm calling the "RowType" is the only place where it's not fixed field. It's "ragged right" but it does start in the same position in the line even for the "next line extension" of the OPT RowType. That's EASY.

The first thing to do is build a BCP FORMAT FILE to control the import. I recommend creating a new directory somewhere on the server itself to hold such format files. Save the following as a format file. On my test box, I saved it under "C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt".


9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\ n\r" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.



The BCP FORMAT FILE skips the 4 spaces at the beginning of each line, picks up the next 3 characters (spaces or not) as the RowType, skips 2 more spaces, and then picks up to the next 8000 characters (ending with a carriage return/line feed) as the "bulk data" for each RowType.

The rest is pretty easy. I saved your file data example as "C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt". You'll, of course, need to change that and the location of the BCP FORMAT FILE. If all of this works out according to you, then I'll show you how to parameterize those two file paths so that you could turn this into a stored procedure.

Here's the code. As normal, the details are in the comments in the code.


--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
SELECT * FROM #BulkData
;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT PhoneNumber = DN
,StationCode = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,Port = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,Options = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OPT' THEN RTRIM(BulkData) ELSE '' END)
+ MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OFL' THEN ' '+LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData)) ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData
GROUP BY DN
;



This is what ends up in the "work" table... (scroll-right to see the new "DN" column)


RowNum RowType BulkData DN
1 DN 326 0000 326 0000
2 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 326 0000
3 OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC 326 0000
4 OFL CFAN 326 0000
5 STN 326 0000
6 DN 326 0001 326 0001
7 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 326 0001
8 OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB 326 0001
9 OFL CFD VM ENQC 326 0001
10 STN 326 0001
11 DN 326 0003 326 0003
12 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 326 0003
13 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD 326 0003
14 STN 326 0003
15 DN 326 0004 326 0004
16 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 326 0004
17 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD 326 0004


Notice how the DN has been "smeared down" for all rows where it first occurs until a new DN row shows up and then that is "smeared down", etc, etc. That's the key that we GROUP on to do the CROSS APPLY to pivot everything and to combine the any existing OFL rows with their respective OPT rows.

Here's what the final output looks like courtesy of the CROSS APPLY.


PhoneNumber StationCode Port Options
----------- ----------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC CFAN
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB CFD VM ENQC
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD


This is the "easy" part, so far. If that's ok by you, the next part would be to split the options (OPT) into separate columns but, I have to ask, do you REALLY want to do that?

Nicely done, Jeff. I'm filing this one away for later, as I'm sure the approach will come in handy some day.


Tally Tables - Performance Personified
String Splitting with True Performance
Best practices on how to ask questions
Ed Wagner
Ed Wagner
SSCoach
SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 16774 Visits: 10084
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
@Koen,

Now you see why I never get into SSIS. I just don't need it.


Everyone has his own tool. I can say the same thing about BCP :-D

You know, Koen, this it the type of thing that almost makes me want to learn SSIS.
I'd probably start with something simpler, but that's for another day. I haven't found anything that was impossible with SQL yet, but I'm sure that day will come eventually. ;-)


Tally Tables - Performance Personified
String Splitting with True Performance
Best practices on how to ask questions
Koen Verbeeck
Koen Verbeeck
One Orange Chip
One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 27665 Visits: 13268
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
@Koen,

Now you see why I never get into SSIS. I just don't need it.


Everyone has his own tool. I can say the same thing about BCP :-D

You know, Koen, this it the type of thing that almost makes me want to learn SSIS.
I'd probably start with something simpler, but that's for another day. I haven't found anything that was impossible with SQL yet, but I'm sure that day will come eventually. ;-)


Importing multiple files in parallel ;-)


How to post forum questions.
Need an answer? No, you need a question.
What’s the deal with Excel & SSIS?
My blog at SQLKover.

MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 87466 Visits: 41116
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
@Koen,

Now you see why I never get into SSIS. I just don't need it.


Everyone has his own tool. I can say the same thing about BCP :-D

You know, Koen, this it the type of thing that almost makes me want to learn SSIS.
I'd probably start with something simpler, but that's for another day. I haven't found anything that was impossible with SQL yet, but I'm sure that day will come eventually. ;-)


Importing multiple files in parallel ;-)


That's not impossible using T-SQL. Just different. I've built many an ETL that does just exactly that without SSIS. I will, however admit that SSIS allows for more easily (click and drag the right block connector type) "waiting" for a given set of parallel imports to complete before continuing the process but even that's not all that difficult to pull off in T-SQL. It's just different.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 87466 Visits: 41116
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/17/2014)
Ok. Here we go. Time for some good ol' fashioned "Black Arts". :-)

The first thing is, is to understand the true nature of the data-file example that was posted. I did that by "quoting the post" that had the example and some remarkable stuff showed up that the HTML rendering on this site was hiding. There's a ton of leading and embedded spaces. Here's what the file data really looks like...


REQ que stn all

STN
DN 326 0000
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01
OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC
CFAN

STN
DN 326 0001
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02
OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB
CFD VM ENQC

STN
DN 326 0003
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD

STN
DN 326 0004
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD



The blank line actually contain 4 spaces. To help us see the spaces, I changed them all to a dash so they're easier to see.


REQ---que-stn-all
----
----STN
----DN---326-0000
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-01-
----OPT--CFW-1MR-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-NACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-CFB-CFD-ENQC-
---------CFAN-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0001
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-02-
----OPT--SUS-CFW-1MR-CWT-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-3261281-ACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-!ECO-!RIT-!124-CFB-
---------CFD-VM-ENQC-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0003
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-16-14-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!TKD-CFB-CFD-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0004
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-19-20-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!LOC-CFB-CFD



That's almost a fixed field format. In fact, the data to the right of what I'm calling the "RowType" is the only place where it's not fixed field. It's "ragged right" but it does start in the same position in the line even for the "next line extension" of the OPT RowType. That's EASY.

The first thing to do is build a BCP FORMAT FILE to control the import. I recommend creating a new directory somewhere on the server itself to hold such format files. Save the following as a format file. On my test box, I saved it under "C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt".


9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\ n\r" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.



The BCP FORMAT FILE skips the 4 spaces at the beginning of each line, picks up the next 3 characters (spaces or not) as the RowType, skips 2 more spaces, and then picks up to the next 8000 characters (ending with a carriage return/line feed) as the "bulk data" for each RowType.

The rest is pretty easy. I saved your file data example as "C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt". You'll, of course, need to change that and the location of the BCP FORMAT FILE. If all of this works out according to you, then I'll show you how to parameterize those two file paths so that you could turn this into a stored procedure.

Here's the code. As normal, the details are in the comments in the code.


--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
SELECT * FROM #BulkData
;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT PhoneNumber = DN
,StationCode = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,Port = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,Options = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OPT' THEN RTRIM(BulkData) ELSE '' END)
+ MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OFL' THEN ' '+LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData)) ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData
GROUP BY DN
;



This is what ends up in the "work" table... (scroll-right to see the new "DN" column)


RowNum RowType BulkData DN
1 DN 326 0000 326 0000
2 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 326 0000
3 OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC 326 0000
4 OFL CFAN 326 0000
5 STN 326 0000
6 DN 326 0001 326 0001
7 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 326 0001
8 OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB 326 0001
9 OFL CFD VM ENQC 326 0001
10 STN 326 0001
11 DN 326 0003 326 0003
12 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 326 0003
13 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD 326 0003
14 STN 326 0003
15 DN 326 0004 326 0004
16 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 326 0004
17 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD 326 0004


Notice how the DN has been "smeared down" for all rows where it first occurs until a new DN row shows up and then that is "smeared down", etc, etc. That's the key that we GROUP on to do the CROSS APPLY to pivot everything and to combine the any existing OFL rows with their respective OPT rows.

Here's what the final output looks like courtesy of the CROSS APPLY.


PhoneNumber StationCode Port Options
----------- ----------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC CFAN
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB CFD VM ENQC
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD


This is the "easy" part, so far. If that's ok by you, the next part would be to split the options (OPT) into separate columns but, I have to ask, do you REALLY want to do that?

Nicely done, Jeff. I'm filing this one away for later, as I'm sure the approach will come in handy some day.


There's a correction that I just made in the original post because this site ate the backslash N. In your quotes above, the \ n\r should be \r\ n (with the appropriate space removal). I had originally pasted the \ n into the wrong spot apparently due to caffeine depletion in the bloodstream. Blush

I also do absolutely agree with Koen that SSIS does make some things (like gated parallel processing) a whole lot easier. If you combine the features of SSIS with the ability for it to call upon stored procedures and the like, it can be a formidable tool.

@Koen...

Is there a way to easily copy packages from one instance of SSIS to another? THAT would make it even more formidable.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Koen Verbeeck
Koen Verbeeck
One Orange Chip
One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)One Orange Chip (27K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 27665 Visits: 13268
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)

@Koen...

Is there a way to easily copy packages from one instance of SSIS to another? THAT would make it even more formidable.


Depends on your definition of "easily", but you can move packages between environment without too much effort.


How to post forum questions.
Need an answer? No, you need a question.
What’s the deal with Excel & SSIS?
My blog at SQLKover.

MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP
marg 14154
marg 14154
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9 Visits: 224
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/17/2014)
Ok. Here we go. Time for some good ol' fashioned "Black Arts". :-)

The first thing is, is to understand the true nature of the data-file example that was posted. I did that by "quoting the post" that had the example and some remarkable stuff showed up that the HTML rendering on this site was hiding. There's a ton of leading and embedded spaces. Here's what the file data really looks like...


REQ que stn all

STN
DN 326 0000
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01
OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC
CFAN

STN
DN 326 0001
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02
OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB
CFD VM ENQC

STN
DN 326 0003
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD

STN
DN 326 0004
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD



The blank line actually contain 4 spaces. To help us see the spaces, I changed them all to a dash so they're easier to see.


REQ---que-stn-all
----
----STN
----DN---326-0000
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-01-
----OPT--CFW-1MR-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-NACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-CFB-CFD-ENQC-
---------CFAN-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0001
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-02-
----OPT--SUS-CFW-1MR-CWT-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-3261281-ACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-!ECO-!RIT-!124-CFB-
---------CFD-VM-ENQC-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0003
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-16-14-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!TKD-CFB-CFD-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0004
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-19-20-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!LOC-CFB-CFD



That's almost a fixed field format. In fact, the data to the right of what I'm calling the "RowType" is the only place where it's not fixed field. It's "ragged right" but it does start in the same position in the line even for the "next line extension" of the OPT RowType. That's EASY.

The first thing to do is build a BCP FORMAT FILE to control the import. I recommend creating a new directory somewhere on the server itself to hold such format files. Save the following as a format file. On my test box, I saved it under "C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt".


9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\ n\r" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.



The BCP FORMAT FILE skips the 4 spaces at the beginning of each line, picks up the next 3 characters (spaces or not) as the RowType, skips 2 more spaces, and then picks up to the next 8000 characters (ending with a carriage return/line feed) as the "bulk data" for each RowType.

The rest is pretty easy. I saved your file data example as "C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt". You'll, of course, need to change that and the location of the BCP FORMAT FILE. If all of this works out according to you, then I'll show you how to parameterize those two file paths so that you could turn this into a stored procedure.

Here's the code. As normal, the details are in the comments in the code.


--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
SELECT * FROM #BulkData
;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT PhoneNumber = DN
,StationCode = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,Port = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,Options = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OPT' THEN RTRIM(BulkData) ELSE '' END)
+ MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OFL' THEN ' '+LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData)) ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData
GROUP BY DN
;



This is what ends up in the "work" table... (scroll-right to see the new "DN" column)


RowNum RowType BulkData DN
1 DN 326 0000 326 0000
2 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 326 0000
3 OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC 326 0000
4 OFL CFAN 326 0000
5 STN 326 0000
6 DN 326 0001 326 0001
7 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 326 0001
8 OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB 326 0001
9 OFL CFD VM ENQC 326 0001
10 STN 326 0001
11 DN 326 0003 326 0003
12 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 326 0003
13 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD 326 0003
14 STN 326 0003
15 DN 326 0004 326 0004
16 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 326 0004
17 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD 326 0004


Notice how the DN has been "smeared down" for all rows where it first occurs until a new DN row shows up and then that is "smeared down", etc, etc. That's the key that we GROUP on to do the CROSS APPLY to pivot everything and to combine the any existing OFL rows with their respective OPT rows.

Here's what the final output looks like courtesy of the CROSS APPLY.


PhoneNumber StationCode Port Options
----------- ----------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC CFAN
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB CFD VM ENQC
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD


This is the "easy" part, so far. If that's ok by you, the next part would be to split the options (OPT) into separate columns but, I have to ask, do you REALLY want to do that?

Nicely done, Jeff. I'm filing this one away for later, as I'm sure the approach will come in handy some day.


There's a correction that I just made in the original post because this site ate the backslash N. In your quotes above, the \ n\r should be \r\ n (with the appropriate space removal). I had originally pasted the \ n into the wrong spot apparently due to caffeine depletion in the bloodstream. Blush

I also do absolutely agree with Koen that SSIS does make some things (like gated parallel processing) a whole lot easier. If you combine the features of SSIS with the ability for it to call upon stored procedures and the like, it can be a formidable tool.

@Koen...

Is there a way to easily copy packages from one instance of SSIS to another? THAT would make it even more formidable.


@Jeff Yes the the OPTion values have to be separated. There is a catch though when separating the OPTions:
1. the paymode is determined from the OPTions, if OPTions contain any one or more of these values: !124,32,82,13,34,38,!RIT,!TDK then its a Prepaid, if in these values: 3,52,DMS10i,58,4,DMS100,8,19,5,9,21,10,7,26,2,37 then its a postpaid. If none of the values are specified, then the default Postpaid.
2. From all possible values of OPTions, the only OPTions' columns needed are:
!BAR !ECO !IDD !LOC !NPA !OPR !STD !VAS 1FR 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CDF CFAN CFB CFBU CFD CFDU CFW CLT CND CNDB COB CWT DGT DNH DOR DTM ENQC FNT FPSV FREQ FRST MCT MTR NACT OCB OPT RTP SUS SUSO SUST VM

Thank you.
marg 14154
marg 14154
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9 Visits: 224
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Koen Verbeeck (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
@Koen,

Now you see why I never get into SSIS. I just don't need it.


Everyone has his own tool. I can say the same thing about BCP :-D

You know, Koen, this it the type of thing that almost makes me want to learn SSIS.
I'd probably start with something simpler, but that's for another day. I haven't found anything that was impossible with SQL yet, but I'm sure that day will come eventually. ;-)


Importing multiple files in parallel ;-)


That's not impossible using T-SQL. Just different. I've built many an ETL that does just exactly that without SSIS. I will, however admit that SSIS allows for more easily (click and drag the right block connector type) "waiting" for a given set of parallel imports to complete before continuing the process but even that's not all that difficult to pull off in T-SQL. It's just different.


I am very much interested in learning how to import using both tools. With SSIS I am bit slow as I am still learning how to script using the .net language .@Koen and Jeff really appreciate your assistance.
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)SSC Guru (87K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 87466 Visits: 41116
marg 14154 (7/20/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/17/2014)
Ok. Here we go. Time for some good ol' fashioned "Black Arts". :-)

The first thing is, is to understand the true nature of the data-file example that was posted. I did that by "quoting the post" that had the example and some remarkable stuff showed up that the HTML rendering on this site was hiding. There's a ton of leading and embedded spaces. Here's what the file data really looks like...


REQ que stn all

STN
DN 326 0000
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01
OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC
CFAN

STN
DN 326 0001
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02
OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB
CFD VM ENQC

STN
DN 326 0003
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD

STN
DN 326 0004
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD



The blank line actually contain 4 spaces. To help us see the spaces, I changed them all to a dash so they're easier to see.


REQ---que-stn-all
----
----STN
----DN---326-0000
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-01-
----OPT--CFW-1MR-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-NACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-CFB-CFD-ENQC-
---------CFAN-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0001
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-02-
----OPT--SUS-CFW-1MR-CWT-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-3261281-ACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-!ECO-!RIT-!124-CFB-
---------CFD-VM-ENQC-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0003
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-16-14-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!TKD-CFB-CFD-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0004
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-19-20-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!LOC-CFB-CFD



That's almost a fixed field format. In fact, the data to the right of what I'm calling the "RowType" is the only place where it's not fixed field. It's "ragged right" but it does start in the same position in the line even for the "next line extension" of the OPT RowType. That's EASY.

The first thing to do is build a BCP FORMAT FILE to control the import. I recommend creating a new directory somewhere on the server itself to hold such format files. Save the following as a format file. On my test box, I saved it under "C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt".


9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\ n\r" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.



The BCP FORMAT FILE skips the 4 spaces at the beginning of each line, picks up the next 3 characters (spaces or not) as the RowType, skips 2 more spaces, and then picks up to the next 8000 characters (ending with a carriage return/line feed) as the "bulk data" for each RowType.

The rest is pretty easy. I saved your file data example as "C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt". You'll, of course, need to change that and the location of the BCP FORMAT FILE. If all of this works out according to you, then I'll show you how to parameterize those two file paths so that you could turn this into a stored procedure.

Here's the code. As normal, the details are in the comments in the code.


--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
SELECT * FROM #BulkData
;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT PhoneNumber = DN
,StationCode = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,Port = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,Options = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OPT' THEN RTRIM(BulkData) ELSE '' END)
+ MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OFL' THEN ' '+LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData)) ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData
GROUP BY DN
;



This is what ends up in the "work" table... (scroll-right to see the new "DN" column)


RowNum RowType BulkData DN
1 DN 326 0000 326 0000
2 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 326 0000
3 OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC 326 0000
4 OFL CFAN 326 0000
5 STN 326 0000
6 DN 326 0001 326 0001
7 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 326 0001
8 OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB 326 0001
9 OFL CFD VM ENQC 326 0001
10 STN 326 0001
11 DN 326 0003 326 0003
12 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 326 0003
13 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD 326 0003
14 STN 326 0003
15 DN 326 0004 326 0004
16 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 326 0004
17 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD 326 0004


Notice how the DN has been "smeared down" for all rows where it first occurs until a new DN row shows up and then that is "smeared down", etc, etc. That's the key that we GROUP on to do the CROSS APPLY to pivot everything and to combine the any existing OFL rows with their respective OPT rows.

Here's what the final output looks like courtesy of the CROSS APPLY.


PhoneNumber StationCode Port Options
----------- ----------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC CFAN
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB CFD VM ENQC
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD


This is the "easy" part, so far. If that's ok by you, the next part would be to split the options (OPT) into separate columns but, I have to ask, do you REALLY want to do that?

Nicely done, Jeff. I'm filing this one away for later, as I'm sure the approach will come in handy some day.


There's a correction that I just made in the original post because this site ate the backslash N. In your quotes above, the \ n\r should be \r\ n (with the appropriate space removal). I had originally pasted the \ n into the wrong spot apparently due to caffeine depletion in the bloodstream. Blush

I also do absolutely agree with Koen that SSIS does make some things (like gated parallel processing) a whole lot easier. If you combine the features of SSIS with the ability for it to call upon stored procedures and the like, it can be a formidable tool.

@Koen...

Is there a way to easily copy packages from one instance of SSIS to another? THAT would make it even more formidable.


@Jeff Yes the the OPTion values have to be separated. There is a catch though when separating the OPTions:
1. the paymode is determined from the OPTions, if OPTions contain any one or more of these values: !124,32,82,13,34,38,!RIT,!TDK then its a Prepaid, if in these values: 3,52,DMS10i,58,4,DMS100,8,19,5,9,21,10,7,26,2,37 then its a postpaid. If none of the values are specified, then the default Postpaid.
2. From all possible values of OPTions, the only OPTions' columns needed are:
!BAR !ECO !IDD !LOC !NPA !OPR !STD !VAS 1FR 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CDF CFAN CFB CFBU CFD CFDU CFW CLT CND CNDB COB CWT DGT DNH DOR DTM ENQC FNT FPSV FREQ FRST MCT MTR NACT OCB OPT RTP SUS SUSO SUST VM

Thank you.


Sorry about the long quote above. I wanted to keep this all together. And, sorry about the delay. I was on vacation last week and forgot all about it.

Getting back on track, the following will do what you've asked for in the last post above. It uses the same BCP Format File, the same file, and almost all of the code is the same except for how we split up the "BulkData" column.

The first thing that you'll need to do is to build the "DelimitedSplit8K" function in whatever database you're doing all of this. It's a fully documented splitter function. You can get the function from the "Resources" section near the bottom of the article at the following link.
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Tally+Table/72993/

Once you've installed the "DelimitedSplit8K" function above, the following code will do as you've asked...


/* BCP Format File used (same as previous)
9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\r\ n" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.
*/

--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
-- SELECT * FROM #BulkData
--;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT [PhoneNumber] = DN
,[StationCode] = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,[Port] = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,[PayMode] = MAX(CASE --Note that the second "WHEN" isn't necessary here but does make the code "future bullet-proof"
WHEN split.Item IN ('!124','32','82','13','34','38','!RIT','!TDK') THEN 'Prepaid'
WHEN split.Item IN ('3','52','DMS10i','58','4','DMS100','8','19','5','9','21','10','7','26','2','37') THEN 'Postpaid'
ELSE 'Postpaid'
END)
,[!BAR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!BAR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!ECO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!ECO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!IDD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!IDD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!LOC] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!LOC' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!NPA] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!NPA' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!OPR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!OPR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!STD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!STD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!VAS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!VAS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[1FR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '1FR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[1MR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '1MR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ACT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ACT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ALTO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ALTO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[AWS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'AWS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CDF] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CDF' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFAN] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFAN' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFBU] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFBU' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFDU] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFDU' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFW] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFW' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CLT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CLT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CND] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CND' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CNDB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CNDB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[COB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'COB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CWT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CWT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DGT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DGT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DNH] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DNH' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DOR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DOR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DTM] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DTM' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ENQC] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ENQC' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FNT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FNT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FPSV] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FPSV' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FREQ] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FREQ' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FRST] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FRST' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[MCT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'MCT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[MTR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'MTR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[NACT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'NACT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[OCB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'OCB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[OPT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'OPT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[RTP] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'RTP' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUSO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUSO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUST] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUST' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[VM] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'VM' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData bd
CROSS APPLY (SELECT CAST(Item AS CHAR(4)) FROM dbo.DelimitedSplit8K(bd.BulkData,' ')) split (Item)
GROUP BY DN
;




Here's what the result set looks like...


PhoneNumber StationCode Port PayMode !BAR !ECO !IDD !LOC !NPA !OPR !STD !VAS 1FR 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CDF CFAN CFB CFBU CFD CFDU CFW CLT CND CNDB COB CWT DGT DNH DOR DTM ENQC FNT FPSV FREQ FRST MCT MTR NACT OCB OPT RTP SUS SUSO SUST VM
----------- ----------- --------------- -------- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 Postpaid !NPA 1MR ALTO AWS CFAN CFB CFD CFW DGT ENQC NACT RTP
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 Prepaid !ECO !NPA 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CFB CFD CFW CWT DGT ENQC NACT RTP SUS VM
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 Postpaid 1MR CFB CFD DGT RTP
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 Postpaid !LOC 1MR CFB CFD DGT RTP





Again, sorry for the delay and thanks for the problem. This was fun. If you have any questions about how this thing works, please post back. If I can't get back to it, the heavy hitters on this forum are pretty familiar with all of these techniques and I'm sure that they'll be happy to answer in my stead.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
marg 14154
marg 14154
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)Forum Newbie (9 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 9 Visits: 224
Jeff Moden (7/30/2014)
marg 14154 (7/20/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/18/2014)
Ed Wagner (7/18/2014)
Jeff Moden (7/17/2014)
Ok. Here we go. Time for some good ol' fashioned "Black Arts". :-)

The first thing is, is to understand the true nature of the data-file example that was posted. I did that by "quoting the post" that had the example and some remarkable stuff showed up that the HTML rendering on this site was hiding. There's a ton of leading and embedded spaces. Here's what the file data really looks like...


REQ que stn all

STN
DN 326 0000
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01
OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC
CFAN

STN
DN 326 0001
LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02
OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB
CFD VM ENQC

STN
DN 326 0003
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD

STN
DN 326 0004
LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20
OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD



The blank line actually contain 4 spaces. To help us see the spaces, I changed them all to a dash so they're easier to see.


REQ---que-stn-all
----
----STN
----DN---326-0000
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-01-
----OPT--CFW-1MR-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-NACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-CFB-CFD-ENQC-
---------CFAN-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0001
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-01-2-12-02-
----OPT--SUS-CFW-1MR-CWT-DGT-RTP-0-ALTO-3261281-ACT-AWS-NACT-!NPA-!ECO-!RIT-!124-CFB-
---------CFD-VM-ENQC-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0003
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-16-14-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!TKD-CFB-CFD-
----
----STN
----DN---326-0004
----LOC--GHUT-ILCE-03-2-19-20-
----OPT--1MR-DGT-RTP-0-!LOC-CFB-CFD



That's almost a fixed field format. In fact, the data to the right of what I'm calling the "RowType" is the only place where it's not fixed field. It's "ragged right" but it does start in the same position in the line even for the "next line extension" of the OPT RowType. That's EASY.

The first thing to do is build a BCP FORMAT FILE to control the import. I recommend creating a new directory somewhere on the server itself to hold such format files. Save the following as a format file. On my test box, I saved it under "C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt".


9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\ n\r" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.



The BCP FORMAT FILE skips the 4 spaces at the beginning of each line, picks up the next 3 characters (spaces or not) as the RowType, skips 2 more spaces, and then picks up to the next 8000 characters (ending with a carriage return/line feed) as the "bulk data" for each RowType.

The rest is pretty easy. I saved your file data example as "C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt". You'll, of course, need to change that and the location of the BCP FORMAT FILE. If all of this works out according to you, then I'll show you how to parameterize those two file paths so that you could turn this into a stored procedure.

Here's the code. As normal, the details are in the comments in the code.


--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
SELECT * FROM #BulkData
;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT PhoneNumber = DN
,StationCode = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,Port = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,Options = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OPT' THEN RTRIM(BulkData) ELSE '' END)
+ MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'OFL' THEN ' '+LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData)) ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData
GROUP BY DN
;



This is what ends up in the "work" table... (scroll-right to see the new "DN" column)


RowNum RowType BulkData DN
1 DN 326 0000 326 0000
2 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 326 0000
3 OPT CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC 326 0000
4 OFL CFAN 326 0000
5 STN 326 0000
6 DN 326 0001 326 0001
7 LOC GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 326 0001
8 OPT SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB 326 0001
9 OFL CFD VM ENQC 326 0001
10 STN 326 0001
11 DN 326 0003 326 0003
12 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 326 0003
13 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD 326 0003
14 STN 326 0003
15 DN 326 0004 326 0004
16 LOC GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 326 0004
17 OPT 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD 326 0004


Notice how the DN has been "smeared down" for all rows where it first occurs until a new DN row shows up and then that is "smeared down", etc, etc. That's the key that we GROUP on to do the CROSS APPLY to pivot everything and to combine the any existing OFL rows with their respective OPT rows.

Here's what the final output looks like courtesy of the CROSS APPLY.


PhoneNumber StationCode Port Options
----------- ----------- --------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 CFW 1MR DGT RTP 0 ALTO NACT AWS NACT !NPA CFB CFD ENQC CFAN
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 SUS CFW 1MR CWT DGT RTP 0 ALTO 3261281 ACT AWS NACT !NPA !ECO !RIT !124 CFB CFD VM ENQC
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 1MR DGT RTP 0 !TKD CFB CFD
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 1MR DGT RTP 0 !LOC CFB CFD


This is the "easy" part, so far. If that's ok by you, the next part would be to split the options (OPT) into separate columns but, I have to ask, do you REALLY want to do that?

Nicely done, Jeff. I'm filing this one away for later, as I'm sure the approach will come in handy some day.


There's a correction that I just made in the original post because this site ate the backslash N. In your quotes above, the \ n\r should be \r\ n (with the appropriate space removal). I had originally pasted the \ n into the wrong spot apparently due to caffeine depletion in the bloodstream. Blush

I also do absolutely agree with Koen that SSIS does make some things (like gated parallel processing) a whole lot easier. If you combine the features of SSIS with the ability for it to call upon stored procedures and the like, it can be a formidable tool.

@Koen...

Is there a way to easily copy packages from one instance of SSIS to another? THAT would make it even more formidable.


@Jeff Yes the the OPTion values have to be separated. There is a catch though when separating the OPTions:
1. the paymode is determined from the OPTions, if OPTions contain any one or more of these values: !124,32,82,13,34,38,!RIT,!TDK then its a Prepaid, if in these values: 3,52,DMS10i,58,4,DMS100,8,19,5,9,21,10,7,26,2,37 then its a postpaid. If none of the values are specified, then the default Postpaid.
2. From all possible values of OPTions, the only OPTions' columns needed are:
!BAR !ECO !IDD !LOC !NPA !OPR !STD !VAS 1FR 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CDF CFAN CFB CFBU CFD CFDU CFW CLT CND CNDB COB CWT DGT DNH DOR DTM ENQC FNT FPSV FREQ FRST MCT MTR NACT OCB OPT RTP SUS SUSO SUST VM

Thank you.


Sorry about the long quote above. I wanted to keep this all together. And, sorry about the delay. I was on vacation last week and forgot all about it.

Getting back on track, the following will do what you've asked for in the last post above. It uses the same BCP Format File, the same file, and almost all of the code is the same except for how we split up the "BulkData" column.

The first thing that you'll need to do is to build the "DelimitedSplit8K" function in whatever database you're doing all of this. It's a fully documented splitter function. You can get the function from the "Resources" section near the bottom of the article at the following link.
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Tally+Table/72993/

Once you've installed the "DelimitedSplit8K" function above, the following code will do as you've asked...


/* BCP Format File used (same as previous)
9.0
4
1 SQLCHAR 0 4 "" 0 Blanks01 ""
2 SQLCHAR 0 3 "" 2 RowType ""
3 SQLCHAR 0 2 "" 0 Blanks02 ""
4 SQLCHAR 0 8000 "\r\ n" 3 BulkData "" <-----<<<< Take the space out between the \ and the n. This site "consumes" backslash n as a control character.
*/

--===== If the work table exists, drop it to make reruns in SSMS easier.
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#BulkData','U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #BulkData
;
--===== Create the work table with the quintessential CLUSTERED index on
-- the RowNum column.
CREATE TABLE #BulkData
(
RowNum INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
,RowType CHAR(3)
,BulkData VARCHAR(8000)
,DN CHAR(8)
)
;
--===== Using the previously constructed BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- load the file into the work table.
-- Because of the structure of the file and the BCP FORMAT FILE,
-- this will skip the blank rows, as well. Makes life real easy.
BULK INSERT #BulkData
FROM 'C:\SQL Examples\Weird Telephone File.txt'
WITH (
FORMATFILE = 'C:\SQL Examples\BulkData.fmt'
,FIRSTROW = 3
,TABLOCK
)
;
--===== Declare a "per row" variable that will be updated for every row.
-- Think "pseudo-cursor" here where we use the natural looping behind
-- the scenes of the UPDATE as if it were a declared cursor.
DECLARE @DN CHAR(8)
;
--===== Using the old fashioned method of a "Quirky Update",
-- do a "data smear" to copy each DN entry "down" to the next rows
-- until we hit another DN entry and then copy that "down", etc.
-- This is where we also assign a RowType to prep for the pivoting
-- that we'll do using an old fashiond CROSSTAB.
-- Notice that this is where we also create the "OFL" or "OVERFLOw"
-- RowType for the "OPT" row "extensions".
-- Heh... when I say "old fashioned", think "Black Arts".
UPDATE tgt
SET @DN = DN = CASE WHEN RowType = 'DN' THEN LEFT(BulkData,8) ELSE ISNULL(@DN,'') END
,RowType = CASE WHEN RowType = '' AND RTRIM(LTRIM(BulkData)) <> 'STN' THEN 'OFL' ELSE RowType END
,BulkData = LTRIM(RTRIM(BulkData))
FROM #BulkData tgt WITH(TABLOCKX,INDEX(1))
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
;
--===== Let's see what we have in the work table...
-- SELECT * FROM #BulkData
--;
--===== Now, let's simultaneously pivot and parse the data using a very high performance CROSSTAB.
SELECT [PhoneNumber] = DN
,[StationCode] = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,1,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData))) ELSE '' END)
,[Port] = MAX(CASE WHEN RowType = 'LOC' THEN RTRIM(LTRIM(SUBSTRING(BulkData,CHARINDEX(' ',BulkData),8000))) ELSE '' END)
,[PayMode] = MAX(CASE --Note that the second "WHEN" isn't necessary here but does make the code "future bullet-proof"
WHEN split.Item IN ('!124','32','82','13','34','38','!RIT','!TDK') THEN 'Prepaid'
WHEN split.Item IN ('3','52','DMS10i','58','4','DMS100','8','19','5','9','21','10','7','26','2','37') THEN 'Postpaid'
ELSE 'Postpaid'
END)
,[!BAR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!BAR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!ECO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!ECO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!IDD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!IDD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!LOC] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!LOC' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!NPA] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!NPA' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!OPR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!OPR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!STD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!STD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[!VAS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '!VAS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[1FR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '1FR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[1MR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = '1MR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ACT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ACT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ALTO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ALTO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[AWS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'AWS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CDF] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CDF' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFAN] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFAN' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFBU] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFBU' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFD] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFD' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFDU] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFDU' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CFW] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CFW' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CLT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CLT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CND] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CND' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CNDB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CNDB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[COB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'COB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[CWT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'CWT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DGT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DGT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DNH] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DNH' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DOR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DOR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[DTM] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'DTM' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[ENQC] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'ENQC' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FNT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FNT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FPSV] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FPSV' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FREQ] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FREQ' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[FRST] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'FRST' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[MCT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'MCT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[MTR] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'MTR' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[NACT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'NACT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[OCB] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'OCB' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[OPT] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'OPT' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[RTP] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'RTP' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUS] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUS' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUSO] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUSO' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[SUST] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'SUST' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
,[VM] = MAX(CASE WHEN split.Item = 'VM' THEN split.Item ELSE '' END)
FROM #BulkData bd
CROSS APPLY (SELECT CAST(Item AS CHAR(4)) FROM dbo.DelimitedSplit8K(bd.BulkData,' ')) split (Item)
GROUP BY DN
;




Here's what the result set looks like...


PhoneNumber StationCode Port PayMode !BAR !ECO !IDD !LOC !NPA !OPR !STD !VAS 1FR 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CDF CFAN CFB CFBU CFD CFDU CFW CLT CND CNDB COB CWT DGT DNH DOR DTM ENQC FNT FPSV FREQ FRST MCT MTR NACT OCB OPT RTP SUS SUSO SUST VM
----------- ----------- --------------- -------- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
326 0000 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 01 Postpaid !NPA 1MR ALTO AWS CFAN CFB CFD CFW DGT ENQC NACT RTP
326 0001 GHUT ILCE 01 2 12 02 Prepaid !ECO !NPA 1MR ACT ALTO AWS CFB CFD CFW CWT DGT ENQC NACT RTP SUS VM
326 0003 GHUT ILCE 03 2 16 14 Postpaid 1MR CFB CFD DGT RTP
326 0004 GHUT ILCE 03 2 19 20 Postpaid !LOC 1MR CFB CFD DGT RTP





Again, sorry for the delay and thanks for the problem. This was fun. If you have any questions about how this thing works, please post back. If I can't get back to it, the heavy hitters on this forum are pretty familiar with all of these techniques and I'm sure that they'll be happy to answer in my stead.


Jeff Thank you so much for assistance. I should be ashamed, you actually did my job for me but then again I am so grateful as you saved me a lot of time and head scratching. :-D .
I have another file I am trying to import as well, a bit different. I was thinking if you assist me with the BCP Format File. (Please refer to attached) . The columns titles have a colon at the end of it.
E.g. in
DN: 3210000
TYPE: PILOT OF DNH HUNT GROUP
SNPA: 675 SIG: DT LNATTIDX: 0
HUNT GROUP: 51 HUNT MEMBER: 0
LINE EQUIPMENT NUMBER: HOST 04 1 00 05
the columns are DN, TYPE, SNPA, SIG, LNATTIDX, HUNT GROUP and LINE EQUIPMENT NUMBER. These lines ---------- depict the end of a phone detail.

Thank you.
Attachments
WeirdPhFile2.txt (9 views, 5.00 KB)
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search