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Looking to 2014


Looking to 2014

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Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Looking to 2014

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Gary Varga
Gary Varga
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I think that the RT ideal is great...as an ideal. I think that experience shows that being able to reuse components (in some form - that is a interesting and in depth technical discussion right there) is key.

Looking forward, I think that the "Metro" UI doesn't sit well in the enterprise. Perhaps there are aspects of it that could be viable but it doesn't sit well with data entry apps, office apps and most administrative apps like timesheet apps. I have yet to see an example of a UI that uses the Win 8 app UI that would bring any of this to the desktop of the average office working (I am not even considering IT roles either).

I too cannot see the next buzz in data (except a continuation or refinement of those from 2013).

HNY!!!

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Summer90
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It will be interesting to see what the XP marketshare is once Microsoft fully desupports it in 2014. Then, if a flaw is found how bad will it be exploited since Microsoft will not patch it.... Right now XP marketshare is still over 25%. We still have some XP PCs here.. not many but a few to support apps that do not support Win7.
chrisn-585491
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2014:

Almost all of our clients are on Windows 7 and SQL Server 2008R2. Don't see that changing much.

More OSS in the form of scripting, DVCS and data tools is coming.
Michael Valentine Jones
Michael Valentine Jones
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SQL Server 2014 In-Memory-OLTP Tables do not support identity columns or foreign keys, so that puts them well outside what I would be willing to accept for a normal application.

They seem more like a marketing ploy, like federated databases, that were good for TCP benchmarks, but no one will use in the real world.

They might be useful for a very small number of "special needs" applications.
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Michael Valentine Jones (1/2/2014)
SQL Server 2014 In-Memory-OLTP Tables do not support identity columns or foreign keys, so that puts them well outside what I would be willing to accept for a normal application.

They seem more like a marketing ploy, like federated databases, that were good for TCP benchmarks, but no one will use in the real world.

They might be useful for a very small number of "special needs" applications.






Wow... I did not know that. That will limit it's use.
Michael Valentine Jones
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Markus (1/2/2014)
Michael Valentine Jones (1/2/2014)
SQL Server 2014 In-Memory-OLTP Tables do not support identity columns or foreign keys, so that puts them well outside what I would be willing to accept for a normal application.

They seem more like a marketing ploy, like federated databases, that were good for TCP benchmarks, but no one will use in the real world.

They might be useful for a very small number of "special needs" applications.






Wow... I did not know that. That will limit it's use.


There are a number of other useful features that are not supported:
check constraints, unique constraints, triggers, full-text indexes, updates to primary key columns, truncate table, alter table, create index, drop index, alter index, filtered indexes, nullable columns, etc.

Transact-SQL Constructs Not Supported by In-Memory OLTP
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn246937(v=sql.120).aspx
djackson 22568
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I so hope you are right about Microsoft abandoning RT and Metro on the desktop. It is the worst idea in computing since the hammer. (Think about it.)

While I "use" Windows 8 at home, I have installed Linux for dual boot, and threaten to get rid of Windows about every other day. I truly believe that MS is going to see significant revenue loss, and possibly push more people to develop desktop apps on Linux targeted to specific business types. Today, most business Linux usage is on the server side. W8 may be the OS that kills MS's monopoly in business.

Dave
djackson 22568
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Markus (1/2/2014)
It will be interesting to see what the XP marketshare is once Microsoft fully desupports it in 2014. Then, if a flaw is found how bad will it be exploited since Microsoft will not patch it.... Right now XP marketshare is still over 25%. We still have some XP PCs here.. not many but a few to support apps that do not support Win7.


Back around November 2012 MS announced that Windows 8 was outselling Windows 7 by huge amounts. Around the end of December they admitted they lied. W8 was doing WORSE than Vista.

I mention that because I do not believe for one second that XP has only 25% of the Windows desktop market. I believe it is far higher than 50% in business, although on personal computers that may not be the case. Most companies buy PCs and then downgrade to XP due to an awful lot of software not running on Windows 7 yet.

I may very well be wrong on my estimates, but I stand by my point that I do not trust MS any longer when it comes to claims about market share.

As an example from healthcare, very few of the products sold to us will run on Windows 7. Most require IE 7 or 8 at the best. Healthcare software vendors are spending money chasing moving regulations from the feds, and do not have time nor resources to spend updating software for Windows 7. A lot are pushing to do that now that XP is losing support - but they are behind. The same goes for SQL, most of my products supported SQL 2000 only when SQL 2008 was released. About 2009 or 2010 they started supporting SQL 2005. This is only one industry, but a lot of people I talk to are still running very old software that won't run under Windows 7.

Dave
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djackson 22568 (1/2/2014)
Markus (1/2/2014)
It will be interesting to see what the XP marketshare is once Microsoft fully desupports it in 2014. Then, if a flaw is found how bad will it be exploited since Microsoft will not patch it.... Right now XP marketshare is still over 25%. We still have some XP PCs here.. not many but a few to support apps that do not support Win7.


Back around November 2012 MS announced that Windows 8 was outselling Windows 7 by huge amounts. Around the end of December they admitted they lied. W8 was doing WORSE than Vista.

I mention that because I do not believe for one second that XP has only 25% of the Windows desktop market. I believe it is far higher than 50% in business, although on personal computers that may not be the case. Most companies buy PCs and then downgrade to XP due to an awful lot of software not running on Windows 7 yet.

I may very well be wrong on my estimates, but I stand by my point that I do not trust MS any longer when it comes to claims about market share.

As an example from healthcare, very few of the products sold to us will run on Windows 7. Most require IE 7 or 8 at the best. Healthcare software vendors are spending money chasing moving regulations from the feds, and do not have time nor resources to spend updating software for Windows 7. A lot are pushing to do that now that XP is losing support - but they are behind. The same goes for SQL, most of my products supported SQL 2000 only when SQL 2008 was released. About 2009 or 2010 they started supporting SQL 2005. This is only one industry, but a lot of people I talk to are still running very old software that won't run under Windows 7.


Oh I don't know.... I'd say the percentages are probably on target. From the IT folks I check with most companies are just about rid of XP now with a few still on legacy systems like two systems here. We have a handful still on XP for that reason. Other than that all Win7. I see us sticking with Win7 for a long time like we did with XP.
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