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Data Philanthropy


Data Philanthropy

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Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Data Philanthropy

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karl 70050
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You mean like sharing data with the NSA without real public oversight?
Dave Poole
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On 3 separate occassions my wife has had to call the police.
1. Robbery in progress
2. Gas canister fell off a lorry onto a dual carriageway
3. Assault on a pensioner

On each occassion she got a surviving brain donor on the end of the 'phone.
The description she gave for the "Gas Canister" incident was "It has falled on the south bound carriageway on the A34 passing Wilmslow.

Of all the things to hear she wasn't expecting "what's south bound?" and "where is that?"
WTF, Google can find it if you type in "Wilmslow A34".

My point is I think anyone who calls an emergency service number should have their cell phone position, date/time, number logged for the purposes of directing the emergency services to that location.
Ditto for land lines.

In fact if the cell phone held your name and address and the other emergency details that are asked when you call the emergency number so as to save time between recording and deployment of the appropriate service that would help.

Back in the 1970s there used to be something called "The SOS talisman". The idea was that (in the days of medallions and Tom Selleck) you'd where a locket that contained your blood group, allergies, emergency contacts etc so if you where injured (probably due to overdose of bad taste) your rescuer would have all the relevant details to hand. I think an emergency data locker in mobile devices would fulfill the same purpose.

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karl 70050
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I think most of the things that you envisioned are already covered by the requirements of the FCC

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/wireless-911-services

and

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/voip-and-911-service

There is a FAQ by Verizon concerning these issues at http://support.verizonwireless.com/faqs/Wireless%20Issues/faq_e911_compliance.html

Yours

Karl
lshanahan
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This could eventually turn from "you should share your data" to "you MUST share your data". Some of the comments in the data philanthropy link are downright scary. Note the talk about "data hoarding" - a prejorative term. And the author of the article responds to the comment with the following: " I fully agree with you that viewing this scenario as charity is quite limiting"

LIMITING?? It begs the question: How would they change the scenario to mitigate the limits?

If a company/individual wishes to share their time, money and even data for a cause they believe in then I say go for it. But the Kilpatrick article smacks of a time when those who choose not to participate will be labeled "data hoarders" or other prejorative terms, then someone starts talking about "data inequality" or something similar and then what was simply a nice idea comes dangerously close to compulsion.

A link from the Global Pulse site (Kilpatrick is the Director of Global Pulse):

Big Data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it

Kind of makes me wonder what the real agenda is.

____________
Just my $0.02 from over here in the cheap seats of the peanut gallery - please adjust for inflation and/or your local currency.
PHYData DBA
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karl 70050 (7/17/2013)
I think most of the things that you envisioned are already covered by the requirements of the FCC

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/wireless-911-services

and

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/voip-and-911-service

There is a FAQ by Verizon concerning these issues at http://support.verizonwireless.com/faqs/Wireless%20Issues/faq_e911_compliance.html

Yours

Karl

Karl, I think that the phrases in his post tell me that the FCC does not govern his emergency services... Maybe the BBC? ;-)
PHYData DBA
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pruitt%E2%80%93Igoe

Be careful when mixing Philanthropy, Technology, and Sociological reform.
The real danger comes after you have succeeded.
These things cost real honest money to do correctly.
Unfortunately, history is filled with examples of good will projects using leading technologies that start out seeming perfect.
However these almost always get hammered on the anvil of avarice and greed into failures of insane proportions.

Social Security and Medicare were both supposed to resolve all issues with retirement and elderly care. Now somehow none of this money will be used as intended because politicians and uninitiated used philanthropic ideals to divert the funds elsewhere.

Even recent technological history shows me that large scale use of anything philanthropic shared freely ends up being something I have to pay way to much for later.
example - Internet
Hehe
Sigerson
Sigerson
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I also have a real problem with being so 'philanthropic' with my personal data. If it's aggregated into a truly anonymous grouping, that's different. But when it's the government, or the Red Cross, or Planned Parenthood, or even NPR collecting personal data on me, I have to that I am adamantly opposed.

Read the Big Data link in Ishanahan's post, "Big Data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it" for a better explanation of what I see as the logical, legal outcome of sharing personal data.

As individuals, we can decide to share our data with the best of motives, but after that, we have absolutely no control over how any for-profit company uses what we give them.

I don't trust Amex or Verizon to operate transparently any more than I trust to government to do so.

Sigerson

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chrisn-585491
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I think there's three types of data that Steve and others are thinking about:

1) There's Open Data from the government that is a great resource. I and many others use this for training, testing, community and business purposes. You want data to test your skills and hardware, it's out there in the petabytes! (You need pointers, message me...)

2) There's the NSA and other TLA agencies collection and such, which isn't really on-topic.

3) There's the data that companies collect, must of which is private and sensitive and frankly not many people should be viewing. I don't know how that heck this could be scrubbed and released when we can't even keep the sensitive parts secure. The information that can be released like quarterly statements and such is...
PHYData DBA
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lshanahan (7/17/2013)
This could eventually turn from "you should share your data" to "you MUST share your data". Some of the comments in the data philanthropy link are downright scary. Note the talk about "data hoarding" - a prejorative term. And the author of the article responds to the comment with the following: " I fully agree with you that viewing this scenario as charity is quite limiting"

LIMITING?? It begs the question: How would they change the scenario to mitigate the limits?

If a company/individual wishes to share their time, money and even data for a cause they believe in then I say go for it. But the Kilpatrick article smacks of a time when those who choose not to participate will be labeled "data hoarders" or other prejorative terms, then someone starts talking about "data inequality" or something similar and then what was simply a nice idea comes dangerously close to compulsion.

A link from the Global Pulse site (Kilpatrick is the Director of Global Pulse):

Big Data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it

Kind of makes me wonder what the real agenda is.

I agree completely. The way he puts it Big Data sounds more like Rearden Metal than a Civil Rights issue.

"Why is it moral to serve the happiness of others, but not your own?
If enjoyment is a value, why is it moral when experienced by others, but immoral when experienced by you?" - Ayn Rand Cool
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