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Asking for Interview Questions


Asking for Interview Questions

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Steve Jones
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Asking for Interview Questions

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Gary Varga
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I think that those candidates of value will pick up this information and run with it and those trying to be devious will locate it anyway e.g. by pretending to be an interviewer looking to ask up to date questions and asking for peer advice. (And, no. I have never done this :crazySmile

The information is just a metaphorical piece of rope really; a good candidate will show that they can take that rope and apply it usefully (perhaps ineptly but honestly and better than not) whilst the devious poor candidate will lack the understanding they claim to have and highlight their own failings and hang themselves.

Either way it is for the actual interviewer to recognise the candidate for the value they bring. Including potential (good and bad). I don't think we should hinder the development of those with potential nor should we push the bad practices underground.

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Abrar Ahmad_
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"I am highly torn on how to handle requests and content on interview questions, but ultimately I think that putting more information out there is the best way to handle things and allow people looking for jobs, as well as those hiring, to educate themselves. "


+1 vote

To put information and experiences; either related to any side of interview desk is helpful for the people.

baabhu
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+ 1.
call.copse
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I'd concur that a rising tide floats all boats; I'm reminded of someone who I knew early in my career who jealously guarded information about how things worked. Pretty sure it never did her any good. Disseminate what you know and think - it can let you know where you might be thinking wrongly (or potentially just differently) to other people who may one day stand between you and your ideal job.
Kingston Dhasian
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I would help the OP if I feel the person has taken some effort in trying to find answers themselves and is not plain lazy.

I have found numerous posts where the OP could have done some basic things mentioned below and found the answers themselves
1. Looked up in Google or BOL
-- They probably don't do this as they are bombarded with numerous links and feel lazy to go through them to find the best one.
2. Try creating a scenario in testing environment and see the results
-- Laziness again in my opinion

If I feel the OP is just lazy, I just ignore and move away.
But, if there is a genuine effort from the OP's side to learn, I think most of us over here do help.


Kingston Dhasian

How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help - Jeff Moden
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/
lshanahan
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There's a tendency in IT circles to use questions that have a more or less definite answer. Yes, it is important to assess a candidate's skills, but from over here in the cheap seats of the peanut gallery, I find it far more important to include much more open-ended questions.

For example, one of the best interview questions I ever heard was: "If I asked you to make me a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, what would you do?" You can tell A LOT about a person by how they answer that.

When I was taking a course to get my A+/Network+ certifications, our instructor related his interview experience for the technical school. Part of the interview was to give a five-minute lesson on how to use a mouse to several of the current staff. Of course, the staff would do things like using the mouse backwards, picking the mouse straight up in the air whenever someone said, "Move the mouse up" and so on.

As a final example, I read about a man who would take candidates for senior positions out for breakfast. He said he would never hire anyone who put salt on their food before tasting it because he felt it indicated they made decisions without assessing a situation first.

In my mind, you get more value out of questions that reveal a person's work habits, how think and how they learn. Frankly, I'd rather hire someone with fair-to-middlin' tech skills who has great personal or customer service skills and shows a demonstrated willingness to learn. I'll teach them the tech. Beyond just asking how a candidate would handle a given situation with, say, a networking problem, I would also ask questions such as;

-How did you learn networking? School? Book? Internet? Good old-fashioned hacking?
-What part of networking is the most difficult for you? The easiest? Why?
-Of all the computer skills out there, which one do you want to learn that you currently know little to nothing about? Is there something you're learning about right now?

When it comes to assessing skills, rather than just giving a technical "fizzbuzz" test, review the answers with the candidate and ask them WHY they took a specific approach or gave a certain answer. If they have no clue, ask them how they might go about coming up with a solution.

You may also want to think about asking questions such as, "Do you work better in the morning or evening?" or "If you did get the job, tell me how to manage you."

The point I am belaboring is that technical assessments are certainly a necessary part of an interview process, but in my mind they are only a part, and in most cases should be a starting point.

____________
Just my $0.02 from over here in the cheap seats of the peanut gallery - please adjust for inflation and/or your local currency.
Chris Hurlbut
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I don't understand why someone would get annoyed by a forum post asking for interview questions, sounds like there are quite a few people that are kinda snobby in these forums.
Megistal
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To my eyes, those two comes up with the way I feel are the best.

One from Phil Factor:
https://www.simple-talk.com/blogs/2009/01/22/technical-interviews-and-tests-have-got-to-stop/]

And the other from Grant Fritchey (Half DBA oriented):
http://www.scarydba.com/2012/09/24/interviewing-a-dba/
You get a call from one of the business people. They tell you that the database is running slow. What do you do?
That get a lot information out of the person in front of you.

Both refers on the solving skills and the approach someone take in front of a problem rather than evaluating skills which a parser does more accurately than most human can ever does or remember tons of specific pages of precise syntax like google and msdn does better than any human...

Finally, there's the "human" side which I feel is mandatory. A great working environment is very important and I look forward to positive type of people.

You got those three, for me you're amongst the best people there is.
In short, you got some skills, if you don't, you will be able to get the info you need to get it done and being positive brings a great value for teamwork and as a general way of life that I like.

my 2 cents
patrickmcginnis59 10839
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churlbut (4/18/2013)
I don't understand why someone would get annoyed by a forum post asking for interview questions, sounds like there are quite a few people that are kinda snobby in these forums.


+1 !!!!!

I actually posted what I felt were valid counter arguments in the last thread on this subject on why withholding interview questions ultimately helped no one and pretty much got one fellow so upset he described me as some sort of forum bully. It did motivate me to take a break from here but in hindsight it looks downright comical.

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic1407022-263-1.aspx

to properly post on a forum:
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/61537/
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