Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Entering Service Account Details During Install


Entering Service Account Details During Install

Author
Message
UncleBoris
UncleBoris
SSC-Enthusiastic
SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 107 Visits: 693
Steve Jones - SSC Editor (4/4/2013)

Especially in a small company, I'd use one account per instance per service, so in general, 2-3 per instance (Agent, SSRS, SSIS, etc)



I have only worked in small companies, so out of interest only why do you say "Especially in a small company" -- are suggesting other security (passwords, network access etc etc) may not be as thorough as a larger company there security is more likely to be compromised?

thanks
dan-572483
dan-572483
SSChasing Mays
SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 641 Visits: 1958
There's not just hacking to worry about. I've seen a situation where we have a Production server and a Test Server running a copy of the production database. We run a process on Test that deletes a large number of records. Part of this process failed, because an obscure part of the software configuration contained a connection path to the production database! If we had been using the same login accounts & service accounts for Test & Production, it would have been a disaster. Since then I've made sure that accounts used on test systems have no permissions on production systems.
dan-572483
dan-572483
SSChasing Mays
SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)SSChasing Mays (641 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 641 Visits: 1958
A larger company is more likely to have its security comprimised. If you have 100,000 employees or more, chances are there are people outside IT with the both the technical knowledge and lack of moral fiber needed to do things they shouldn't. That's not so likely in a non-tech company with 20 people. Secondly, it's a certainty that large companies like Microsoft & Boeing are targeted by skilled hackers every day, while a small company who serves only local customers may not be.

Still, that's no excuse, because the possibility of both scenarios exists for all organizations regardless of size.
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC-Dedicated
SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (36K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 36004 Visits: 18728
Dan makes great points, but the reason I say especially at a smaller company is that you have less to manage. It's easier to set service accounts for a dozen or so instances.

At a larger company, imagine 1000 instances. It becomes a chore if you deploy instances at any scale. We had hundreds (300-400) at one place I worked, and we had separate accounts, but developers, Windows admins, etc. constantly complained. Getting new accounts, setting things up, was a small issue (to me), but it felt large (to some people).

I typically use a long, 25char, one time password for service accounts. Someone creates the account, writes down the password (no digital trails), we enter it in on setup (or later) and then we destroy the paper. If we need to get to the service account, we just change the password.

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search