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Starting to Program


Starting to Program

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thadeushuck
thadeushuck
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.net stuff
http://www.homeandlearn.co.uk/net/vbnet.html
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=.net%20basics%20tutorial&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CFgQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdownload.microsoft.com%2Fdownload%2F8%2Fe%2F7%2F8e725d96-7ec3-498b-9fa7-86779aed101f%2Fdotnet%2520tutorial%2520for%2520beginners.pdf&ei=Hvf2T_uBHefo0QHg3ui9Bg&usg=AFQjCNGMBVWUAloXCkrDy6q7BCidxw_zQA PDF tutorial
http://asp.net-tutorials.com/basics/introduction/ ASP tutorial

powershell stuff
http://www.powershellpro.com/powershell-tutorial-introduction/tutorial-windows-powershell-console/ use sidebars to nav
http://powertoe.wordpress.com/2009/11/10/powershell-part-1/ navigate thru it
http://technet.microsoft.com/library/ee332526.aspx task based

I'd suggest picking to learn one or two language flavors to do what you need. I like to have monitoring pages and dashboards to look at and into the complex environments, I work in. So .net and powershell make a formatable supporting cast since most of what I want to know I get from SQL. All the secrets are kept in these things called books...
GBimberg
GBimberg
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As an old programmer, I recommend a .net language. I prefer C#, but VB is closer to English and is used in Microsoft Applications like Access and Excel.
Robert Domitz
Robert Domitz
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You must be a youngster - that's an 029 keypunch! When I punched FORTRAN cards, I used an 026!:-D

(Thanks to www.columbia.edu for the image!)
Rod
Rod
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Ah, programming. Definitely where I feel most "at home", as I am a programmer first, and then an accidental DBA second. However, I've been programming for a long time. What I started on is probably no longer relevant. If its a new programming language I'm trying to learn, then I'll often go to Amazon.com to see if I can find a book on it. If there's a tough problem I've encountered while programming I'll post a message on Microsoft's MSDN forums (social.msdn.microsoft.com) and on StackOverflow (stackoverflow.com). Both are excellent.

Kindest Regards,RodConnect with me on LinkedIn.
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Michael Meierruth (7/6/2012)
Steve,
I got a real bang seeing that photo on the right hand side of your editorial. Not many people can say they actually ever used a card punch machine. I can say that I used it and enjoyed it. and was really good at it.. and it brings back some good feelings of the past - like BASIC, FORTRAN, ASSEMBLER and yes COBOL.


Thought a few people would like that. I didn't do cards, but I did do early compiles where I could watch the lines of code compile on the screen. And read them as they went by

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Steph Locke
Steph Locke
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Coming from a fairly non-technical background and getting into BI via the gateway program (i.e. excel which makes you want to go on to harder, more powerful programs and languages like sql) I've found that actual coding I can do, but what I struggle with is finding resources pegged at a non-geek level regarding network/server configuration tasks.

It's things like:
- multiple domain mapping
- core cmd-line requirements
- security groups/firewalls
- simple how-tos for iis
- framework installations and configurations

Many of these tasks are simple (theoretically) but I find these hard because the writers seem to assume a level of intimacy with the jargon that's way beyond me. I've been working recently on setting up a blog, and the aim was to have a wordpress blog set on an ec2 instance and having two domains (.com and .info) pointing to it with subdomains (steph. and oz.). It was such a nightmare of a task that in the end I paid someone $10 (via fiverr.com an awesome site) to do it since I could not find any resources written at the right level. Of course now I'm having to learn linux cmd-line stuff because the server doesn't have a gui, but at least there's some very simple articles out there on it.
mstjean
mstjean
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Keypunch/Show of Hands

And how many decks of cards did YOU drop before you learned to be certain the switch on that machine was set to PRINT = ON ?

(and that there was actually ink printing the sequence number on your card)

IIRC (and I may not) one of those 4 switches centered over the keyboard was the one to look for.


Cursors are useful if you don't know SQL
Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
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Steve Jones - SSC Editor (7/6/2012)
Michael Meierruth (7/6/2012)
Steve,
I got a real bang seeing that photo on the right hand side of your editorial. Not many people can say they actually ever used a card punch machine. I can say that I used it and enjoyed it. and was really good at it.. and it brings back some good feelings of the past - like BASIC, FORTRAN, ASSEMBLER and yes COBOL.


Thought a few people would like that. I didn't do cards, but I did do early compiles where I could watch the lines of code compile on the screen. And read them as they went by


Oh yes, memories. Did you know that you could actually run a Burroughs B3500 computer using the aforementioned card punch and the card reader and line printer on the B3500? Actually had to do it twice while stationed in England many years ago.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

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Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
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mstjean (7/6/2012)
Keypunch/Show of Hands

And how many decks of cards did YOU drop before you learned to be certain the switch on that machine was set to PRINT = ON ?

(and that there was actually ink printing the sequence number on your card)

IIRC (and I may not) one of those 4 switches centered over the keyboard was the one to look for.


If you have the sequence numbers punched in the cards, then all you needed was a card sorter. Much easier than doing it by hand.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
mstjean
mstjean
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mstjean (7/6/2012)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Keypunch/Show of Hands

And how many decks of cards did YOU drop before you learned to be certain the switch on that machine was set to PRINT = ON ?

(and that there was actually ink printing the sequence number on your card)

IIRC (and I may not) one of those 4 switches centered over the keyboard was the one to look for.


If you have the sequence numbers punched in the cards, then all you needed was a card sorter. Much easier than doing it by hand.
Lynn Pettis


Heh... my school didn't have that kinda newfangled toy. I also suspect they deliberately double-waxed the floors in the data center.


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