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Very new to Data Mining


Very new to Data Mining

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Koen Verbeeck
Koen Verbeeck
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Raunak Jhawar (10/8/2010)
Best. Baby Diapers and Beer. Couldn't have asked a better example. You Rock. :-D


It is a classic example, used many times to explain data mining.
However, it is not true:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/08/15/beer_diapers/

Seriously, have you ever been in a supermarket where beer and diapers are next to each other? :-D

Better examples I've found in every day life:

* supermarkets use data mining to see if a promotion on a product was succesfull and to see if the products in the intermediate area of said product sold less or more.

* supermarkets also use data mining to send you "personalized" coupons

* Amazon uses data mining to suggest you books that might interest you. (this is correlation. Amazon checks the books you've bought or looked at, and uses these to find books that are highly correlated with those. As more and more people come at the Amazon site, the correlation algorithm gets more and more precise.)

* analysis of the customer base to find a certain demographic that might find a certain brochure interesting



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Koen Verbeeck
Koen Verbeeck
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I was thinking about the "beers and diapers" example during dinner, and maybe there can be some truth in it:
if beer and diapers are highly correlated, you should not set them together (as in the example), but instead put them as far apart as you can (as in real life). If there's someone in the store who wants to buy beer and diapers (me, for example), he'd have to traverse the whole store. This way the store can present its wonderful products along the way, which is exactly what they want.



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Raunak Jhawar
Raunak Jhawar
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This is one test case scenario...
There are also chances of pre assumptions by a certain lot of customers pre-assuming that since many stores have a definite store arrangement they may tend to believe that the said product is not available. Which though is a negative test case...should be considered.

Regards/Raunak
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kapfundestanley
kapfundestanley
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I really love the explanation so clear.

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mtassin
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I still don't get it... then again SSAS leaves me confused on days that end with Y

1. Say I have a well functioning cube.
A. How do I turn data mining loose on it? I realize it's part of SSAS, but making it do anything seems confusing.
B. How do I present the results of the Data Mining? Near as I can tell, the only way to do that is via the Excel Data
Mining plug-in. Except of course the Excel DM plugin doesn't work with 64-bit excel.

2. Do certain table designs work best for DM?

3. Is there a simple way to bring the DM values into the cube itself? i.e. if I'm using the DM to extrapolate a growth curve, how would I have SSAS extend the line past the end of the data?



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logicinside22
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very good start of separate forum and basic question on data mining. i am also interested to know more and deep...
can suggest any good book or article?
Thanks

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iwin_it
iwin_it
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Appreciable response for good understanding. This will help others also who are seeking something related to business intelligence and data mining as well as the difference between both.

Business Intelligence : Sigma Infosolutions
iwin_it
iwin_it
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Appreciable response for good understanding. This will help others also who are seeking something related to business intelligence and data mining as well as the difference between both.

Business Intelligence : Sigma Infosolutions
Andrew G
Andrew G
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There was a great introduction to data mining by Russ Blake at au teched 2012. The slides are here: http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/Australia/2012/DBI226
Data mining for fun and for profit
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