SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Break Problems Down


Break Problems Down

Author
Message
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)SSC Guru (619K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 619994 Visits: 21261
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Break Problems Down

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 896069 Visits: 48245
Good article and reminder on one of the fundamentals of how to successfully determine a solution for virtually any problem. Granny used to say "You can only peel one potato at a time". In code, a lot of us call it "Divide'n'Conquer".

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 318 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Jonathan AC Roberts
Jonathan AC Roberts
SSChampion
SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 10794 Visits: 4825
Jeff Moden - Saturday, November 17, 2018 5:00 PM
Good article and reminder on one of the fundamentals of how to successfully determine a solution for virtually any problem. Granny used to say "You can only peel one potato at a time". In code, a lot of us call it "Divide'n'Conquer".

And when eating an elephant take one bite at a time.

call.copse
call.copse
SSChampion
SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)SSChampion (14K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 14731 Visits: 2462
Yes. It's always worked for me. Internally I might be panicking, thinking how on earth can I get this done? when given a new major requirement or something we've never done. When you break it down though, there are only ever one or two novel aspects. You can easily assess the nub of what you need to achieve with those. The rest is just breaking it down, to things you've tackled plenty - and smiling and looking in control even when super stressed....
jasona.work
jasona.work
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)SSC-Forever (45K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 45349 Visits: 16888
My troubleshooting mantra has largely been "always check the basics, even if you're *sure* the problem's not there." Because all to frequently, it's going to be, it's going to be something you assumed couldn't be the problem, that is the problem.

As you get better and better at troubleshooting, you'll get faster and faster at verifying the basics are all correct.
erb2000
erb2000
Ten Centuries
Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1336 Visits: 183
Great advice! In C it's called printf and people would joke about me using the "printf debugger". It's especially useful to minimize timing changes when debugging a race condition. "It works when I put a halt in and use the debugger."
Frank Fulton
Frank Fulton
Ten Centuries
Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.2K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1224 Visits: 268
Back in the Day when we used Punch Cards, Terminals and Teletypes, we would actually create flow charts for how we expected the programs to flow. Then we would write Pseudocode, and step through it several times keeping track of the variables, etc.. Next we would chose the best language to use from what was available PL/1, COBAL, FORTRAN, PASCAL, and my personal favorite Assembly.
Today most people (myself included) usually sit down and start writing code in the company standard language and keep adding functions till we have it all working, and then we check to see if it works right.
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)SSC Guru (896K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 896069 Visits: 48245
Frank W Fulton Jr - Tuesday, November 20, 2018 7:24 PM
Back in the Day when we used Punch Cards, Terminals and Teletypes, we would actually create flow charts for how we expected the programs to flow. Then we would write Pseudocode, and step through it several times keeping track of the variables, etc.. Next we would chose the best language to use from what was available PL/1, COBAL, FORTRAN, PASCAL, and my personal favorite Assembly.
Today most people (myself included) usually sit down and start writing code in the company standard language and keep adding functions till we have it all working, and then we check to see if it works right.


If I haven't actually drawn a flow chart, the first thing I do is write comments as if they were a flow chart. Then I fill in the space between the comments with code to do what the comments say. I test each section of code as I write it to ensure that it's working correctly and with the right amount of performance so that I don't have to go back to it once I add the final semi-colon to indicate that section is done.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 318 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum









































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search