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Is learning Python/R an advantage for SQL Server Developers? Need an expert advice.


Is learning Python/R an advantage for SQL Server Developers? Need an expert advice.

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Vivek Grover
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Hello Guys,

Is it time for SQL Server Developers to start learning R/Python to excel in their career? Expert advice needed.



=============================================
Best Regards,
Vivek Grover
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Phil Parkin
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GroverVivek - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:50 AM
Hello Guys,

Is it time for SQL Server Developers to start learning R/Python to excel in their career? Expert advice needed.

As these are now baked in to 2017, I'd say that it is a good idea. Whether you need learn both is a different question ... personally, I'd go with Python only.



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You should be learning constantly. Whether it's R or Python (I prefer R) for data work that can't easily be done in the DB engine, or Powershell/Bash for automation, or U-SQL if you work with 'big data' or.... is up to you

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In general, they're good to learn because they are popular, they are on the rise, and they mostly deal with data.

If you will actually use it in the work place is up to the business. A lot of companies that are Microsoft shops may lean away from it still and lean more towards .NET, Powershell and so forth regardless if SQL Server or Visual Studio support it and the resources have been using it with the tech for years. But, there are some that do embrace it because it's needed for analytics/data science as well cheaper to develop in (i.e.: Python was originally for prototyping and thus is faster to develop apps in than .NET)

Personally, I think you should. I use Python every day with SQL Server and especially Azure. The cloud and advanced analytics is on the rise and it has the most need for Python for automation and even data pipelines. Python specially is great for converting R scripts into automated applications that can be injected right into the heart of your SQL Server as well other enterprise applications you may be developing in other languages.

Python is more of a need for you than R because R is domain specific and really is not much use to you from a SQL Developer standpoint. Python is better for actual development, ETL, API's, apps, and especially automation and even maintenance.
Chris Harshman
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SQL Server Developer is such a broad title, that it's really impossible to tell, as that role will vary from company to company. I'd suggest it's important to understand how each is used with SQL Server, but if your role doesn't fit the purpose of the language then it doesn't make sense to learn it.
Revenant
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Learning Python as a language is easy, if you have any experience with programming languages. The trick is that there are 6,300 published Python libraries. Spending 10 minutes on each to find what it can do for you is a full time two years job. (If you can remember the first library after you examine the last one, otherwise you could start over.)
Jeff Moden
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GroverVivek - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:50 AM
Hello Guys,

Is it time for SQL Server Developers to start learning R/Python to excel in their career? Expert advice needed.


Heh... yes... but only if they actually know T-SQL very well first. Wink Many people fall way short in that area and then resort to other things to try to make up for their lack of knowledge in T-SQL because they frequently don't even know IF T-SQL is capable of doing something.

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jonathan.crawford
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Jeff Moden - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 12:51 PM
GroverVivek - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:50 AM
Hello Guys,

Is it time for SQL Server Developers to start learning R/Python to excel in their career? Expert advice needed.


Heh... yes... but only if they actually know T-SQL very well first. Wink Many people fall way short in that area and then resort to other things to try to make up for their lack of knowledge in T-SQL because they frequently don't even know IF T-SQL is capable of doing something.


Yes, but.

Different tools do different things. I like to use R for some visualizations that SSRS doesn't do well for me, also keep trying to dream up new ways to visualize existing data for others to get better use out of it, and R has a lot of capability for a pretty low learning curve. Also a lot of depth if you want to apply statistical analysis and understand how to do it properly (not necessarily me, but always trying to learn more)

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Phil Parkin
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jonathan.crawford - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 1:06 PM
Jeff Moden - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 12:51 PM
Heh... yes... but only if they actually know T-SQL very well first. Wink Many people fall way short in that area and then resort to other things to try to make up for their lack of knowledge in T-SQL because they frequently don't even know IF T-SQL is capable of doing something.

Yes, but.
Different tools do different things. I like to use R for some visualizations that SSRS doesn't do well for me, also keep trying to dream up new ways to visualize existing data for others to get better use out of it, and R has a lot of capability for a pretty low learning curve. Also a lot of depth if you want to apply statistical analysis and understand how to do it properly (not necessarily me, but always trying to learn more)

Valid point, but I can't see how this negates Jeff's comment in any way.



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If the answer to your question can be found with a brief Google search, please perform the search yourself, rather than expecting one of the SSC members to do it for you.

Please surround any code or links you post with the appropriate IFCode formatting tags. It helps readability a lot.
jonathan.crawford
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Because I don't have to know T-SQL inside out and upside down in order to use R for something that SQL won't even do.

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