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The Blame Game


The Blame Game

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Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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I'm not defending her, or Equifax. They failed in many ways.

I'm saying that pointing out a person's degree as any evidence of failure is improper.

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
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chrisn-585491
chrisn-585491
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Steve Jones - SSC Editor - Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:10 PM
I'm not defending her, or Equifax. They failed in many ways.

I'm saying that pointing out a person's degree as any evidence of failure is improper.

It's interesting to note that her counterparts at the other two agencies have IT/CS backgrounds.

I'm thinking that if I'm the CSO/CTO of a top critical data company, I have some serious domain knowledge other than hanging out with the MBAs and a few management notches on the resume. The reason I feel this way, is that I've seen too many "business" types drive a technical company into the ground by going through the management motions without understanding the tech. Hundreds of companies over the decades. (Not that tech people can't mismanage tech companies as well...)

I don't want rent-a-cops guarding valuable hordes of personal data, I want serious cyber warrior types.

Matt Miller (4)
Matt Miller (4)
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chrisn-585491 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:05 PM
Steve Jones - SSC Editor - Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:10 PM
I'm not defending her, or Equifax. They failed in many ways.

I'm saying that pointing out a person's degree as any evidence of failure is improper.

It's interesting to note that her counterparts at the other two agencies have IT/CS backgrounds.

I'm thinking that if I'm the CSO/CTO of a top critical data company, I have some serious domain knowledge other than hanging out with the MBAs and a few management notches on the resume. The reason I feel this way, is that I've seen too many "business" types drive a technical company into the ground by going through the management motions without understanding the tech. Hundreds of companies over the decades. (Not that tech people can't mismanage tech companies as well...)

I don't want rent-a-cops guarding valuable hordes of personal data, I want serious cyber warrior types.

I don't think Steve is giving anyone a pass on knowing what they need to in order to be competent. A lot of people who are competent in IT didn't start out in IT or have the actual degree: they learned it on the job etc. More of a "don't throw the baby out with the bath" simply because of her undergrad degree.

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Your lack of planning does not constitute an emergency on my part...unless you're my manager...or a director and above...or a really loud-spoken end-user..All right - what was my emergency again?
xsevensinzx
xsevensinzx
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chrisn-585491 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:05 PM
Steve Jones - SSC Editor - Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:10 PM
I'm not defending her, or Equifax. They failed in many ways.

I'm saying that pointing out a person's degree as any evidence of failure is improper.

It's interesting to note that her counterparts at the other two agencies have IT/CS backgrounds.

I'm thinking that if I'm the CSO/CTO of a top critical data company, I have some serious domain knowledge other than hanging out with the MBAs and a few management notches on the resume. The reason I feel this way, is that I've seen too many "business" types drive a technical company into the ground by going through the management motions without understanding the tech. Hundreds of companies over the decades. (Not that tech people can't mismanage tech companies as well...)

I don't want rent-a-cops guarding valuable hordes of personal data, I want serious cyber warrior types.

That's not really anything to do with those "business" types not understanding technology. It's more to do with those examples not knowing how to build and manage their own departments to where they DO understand where to go. This is pretty much universal across any team let alone IT because when you get to that level, you're almost always relying on the management team you hired for your department who are those serious domain knowledge people. If you can't do that effectively, then it doesn't matter if you have domain knowledge or not because domain knowledge is useless if you don't have the intel from your management team who is on the ground with the people doing the actual work with them.

Rod
Rod
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I wasn't aware of the fact that the former CEO of Equifax classed the data breach on a hardware failure and someone in IT. You're right Steve, this is a potentially disturbing development. Other companies that have a data breach, may point the finger to someone in IT. I'm sure that to a degree, whoever the IT person is they are partially responsible. But I don't think it's all their fault.

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mjh 45389
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I actually finds it disturbing how much information some of these companies have access to! Just over a year ago I was told that a certain company would do a security check before passing me to an agent. The person doing the cheque knew the details for my last salary payment, the date and amount I paid Amex the previous month, etc. Being able to access a myriad of information like this seems by default insecure. It also seems quite vague as to the security checks these people go through. In the same way parking agencies can access your vehicle ownership details despite many of their staff coming over as criminals themselves! End of Friday Rant!

As regards a person's first degree this is in m y view largely irrelevant. When I was looking for a job one company covered ageism by saying they were looking for someone with a computer science degree. I have a degree in physics and a masters in IT so, sorry, that was complete rubbish. Two of the best programmers I have come across in recent years had degrees in music and Latin respectively. I think it does need to be a rigorous degree but not specifically computer science.
Rod
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I've got a question which is related to Equifax, but not specific to this question/thread. I haven't done a credit rating check on myself in several years, but I know that other companies do that for their own research, like when I apply for a loan or some companies do that when you're applying for a job. Is there any way to find out if your personal information is on the 143 million that were compromised?


Kindest Regards,Rod
Connect with me on LinkedIn.
mjh 45389
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Rod at work - Friday, October 13, 2017 9:10 AM
I've got a question which is related to Equifax, but not specific to this question/thread. I haven't done a credit rating check on myself in several years, but I know that other companies do that for their own research, like when I apply for a loan or some companies do that when you're applying for a job. Is there any way to find out if your personal information is on the 143 million that were compromised?


Equifax set up a website where you can check but allegedly it is not 100% accurate. I tried to post the link but it results in me exiting the forum!
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Rod at work - Friday, October 13, 2017 9:10 AM
I've got a question which is related to Equifax, but not specific to this question/thread. I haven't done a credit rating check on myself in several years, but I know that other companies do that for their own research, like when I apply for a loan or some companies do that when you're applying for a job. Is there any way to find out if your personal information is on the 143 million that were compromised?


Just assume it is. I wouldn't trust that they know exactly what was and wasn't released.

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jasona.work
jasona.work
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Steve Jones - SSC Editor - Friday, October 13, 2017 10:30 AM
Rod at work - Friday, October 13, 2017 9:10 AM
I've got a question which is related to Equifax, but not specific to this question/thread. I haven't done a credit rating check on myself in several years, but I know that other companies do that for their own research, like when I apply for a loan or some companies do that when you're applying for a job. Is there any way to find out if your personal information is on the 143 million that were compromised?


Just assume it is. I wouldn't trust that they know exactly what was and wasn't released.

At this point, I think Equifax is basically saying "your data was stolen." I know the wife and I took the steps to freeze our credit reports with all three of the companies (Equifax, Transunion, and whatever the other one is,) normally there's a fee to do this unless you have proof your identity was stolen and used.

Equifax didn't charge either of us, which says something right there.

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