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Foreign key


Foreign key

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Igor Micev
Igor Micev
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Foreign key

Igor Micev,
My blog: www.igormicev.com
M&M
M&M
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Answer sounds ambigous. Please clarify on the answer explanation.

M&M
Carlo Romagnano
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Another tricky and bad worded question.
In the earlier versions of any DBMS, the foreign key was implemented thru triggers.
So the answer should be "YES, implemented by trigger."
Or change the question: a CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY could reference a table in another database?
Example:
ALTER TABLE XXX ADD CONSTRAINT FK_XXX_NNN FOREIGN KEY(a)
REFERENCES ANOTHERDB.dbo.NNN(a)
In this case the answer is NO.
kaspencer
kaspencer
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Be careful!

The question did not mention SQL Server.
I believe that you can use a trigger in Oracle (wash your mouth out, Spencer!) to permit a foreign key to reference a remote or external database.

Only when we get to the explanation does SQL Server come into it.

(OK, before hundreds of respondents criticise me, I know what this website is called.)

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Hugo Kornelis
Hugo Kornelis
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I flipped a coin and ended up lucky. Two answers can both be considered correct.

No, a foreign key constraint can not be created across databases. If you refer to the actual constraint of that name, as supported by SQL Server.
Yes, a foreign key constraint can be enforced across databases using triggers. If you refer to the actual meaning of the constraint in a logical model.

With just the "yes" and "no" answers and a slight rewording of the question to prevent the ambiguity, this would have been a great question. With this wording *and* the presence of both "no" and "yes, with a trigger" in the answers, the question tries to trick people into giving the wrong answer. I assume that this was not the intention of the author - but it does have that effect!


Hugo Kornelis, SQL Server MVP
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Igor Micev
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Hi All,
Yes, I agree with some members that the question is a bit ambiguous, but I put the third option to make the question “ambiguous” i.e. to make you think a bit more about. Just review the first note on the following link http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175464.aspx.
I also put a sqlservercentral post to clarify the third option of this QotD: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic157655-8-1.aspx#bm157658
Yes, the question is about SQL server by default, if it was for Oracle or another database, it would have been appointed.
The question is inspired by practice, and I didn’t have any intention to put ambiguity in answering it.


Thank You
IgorMi

Igor Micev,
My blog: www.igormicev.com
Thomas Abraham
Thomas Abraham
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Igor, thanks for the question. Made me think. Maybe it was easier for me, as I answered the question in my head, before being presented with the three possible answers.

For those of you for which it will be a holiday, Happy Easter.

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Jack Corbett
  Jack Corbett
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Hugo Kornelis (4/6/2012)
I flipped a coin and ended up lucky. Two answers can both be considered correct.

No, a foreign key constraint can not be created across databases. If you refer to the actual constraint of that name, as supported by SQL Server.
Yes, a foreign key constraint can be enforced across databases using triggers. If you refer to the actual meaning of the constraint in a logical model.

With just the "yes" and "no" answers and a slight rewording of the question to prevent the ambiguity, this would have been a great question. With this wording *and* the presence of both "no" and "yes, with a trigger" in the answers, the question tries to trick people into giving the wrong answer. I assume that this was not the intention of the author - but it does have that effect!


+1. I went with no because I don't consider enforcing referential integrity through a trigger a foreign key, but the question could have been worded better to make it less ambiguous.



Jack Corbett

Applications Developer

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Jaroslav Pfauser
Jaroslav Pfauser
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There are 3 options(Yes, No, Yes by using triggers) and you can check only one of them.
So if it will be Yes by using triggers than also Answer Yes is correct. So Third option can't be correct, because in that case the first option is also correct.

So it reduce options on No and "Yes but without using triggers" (Yes-Yes by using triggers).
And from those 2 options it was easy to choose the correct one.
sestell1
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Ugh, should have gone with my first impulse, but then I thought it was a trick since you can create a foreign key type of relationship across databases with triggers.
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