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Posted Monday, August 27, 2007 3:44 PM


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There are some tools that help. I know that if you were to have a Blogger or one of the popular sites, Word 2007 can actually publish to that site. I'm sure there are other tools that work with different sites.

However I'd think it would be different content on different sites. My personal site is mostly for family and friends. The SSC one is really for work/career. I never give out my personal site in an interview. Just isn't relevant.







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Post #394157
Posted Monday, August 27, 2007 6:03 PM
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I think blogging might not be good idea in a corporate world.  It puts too much emphasis on the individual person writing the blog.  It's not organized and not consistant.  If companies want to post technical information for people to share.  Then software programs like Wiki's or Microsoft Sharepoint would be the ideal candidate.  Blogs are more personal and should be kept out of the corporate culture.

 

 

 




Post #394173
Posted Monday, August 27, 2007 6:14 PM
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Not srue I agree with that. Replace "blog" with "easy way to post web content" and there are lot of situations where it makes more sense in the corporate world.

Andy
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Post #394174
Posted Monday, August 27, 2007 10:12 PM


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Like what, Andy?  Not challenging you here... I'd really like to know...

I find that most developers are very protective of what they know because of job security and all that... what makes folks think that developers will actually post anything useful?  And, where would YOU look for information on a subject like maybe tuning a query or paging in a GUI?  A company sponsored blog area?



--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

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How to post code problems
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Post #394190
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 6:00 AM
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Jeff, I agreed with you. These days are totally different, no one shares information anymore. Going to work is no more fun !!!!! You have to be careful what you say and what you do. Even I suggest something that it can make the system perform faster, the DBA, the manager may not like it because they are afraid you will take over their job !!! Just pretend to be dumb and do what they tell you to do.
Post #394253
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 6:53 AM
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The SSC timeout just ate my long winded reply - who built this thing anyway!

Andy
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Post #394268
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 7:35 AM
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Jeff, thats a fair question. Dont know that my answer will do it justice, but here goes. I can see a few developers posting code bits, but you're right, probably not a lot. I think a blog about db related critical incidents would be very valuable, what happened, how long to fix, what was the fix, something that goes beyond the 'server is up again' email. Or a blog about perf improvements, what you tuned, how much gain, how it impacts the company/application.

Blogs are about communicating and we can pick our media; email, IM, blog, web report, conference call, in person meeting, wiki (sorta). Each have their place but we tend to overuse email. It's a great thing to allow senior mgrs to see a bit of what goes on 2 or more levels down, and definitely to see what goes on with their direct reports - things that wouldn't merit an email. Results of a team building trip. Someone speaking at a local user group event. New employees joining the team. Blogs are an easy and informal way to communicate some stuff that might be technical or to personalize what can be a very faceless business. The more transparency we can create the better the business will do.

Different standards for internal vs external blogs. Internally posts should be professional, but its absolutely ok to voice frustration occasionally, just think about who would read it and are they seeing enough of the story to see where your frustration comes from. External blogs are different, look at the recent Google fiasco around medical records.

I work at very small company so we do email and phone, no need for blogs internally at this point. Externally we communicate monthly to our customer/prospects, and we issue the rare formal press release. My SSC blog kinda splits the difference, they can see some of my professional thoughts that relate to the business, but it's a me blog, not a company blog.

Blogs don't take a lot of time, I spend maybe 5 minutes typing in each of mine. I'd think most companies would be ok with that, but worse case you come in 5 mins early to work!

Looking at this, Im not sure I've said it well - which is generally a sign that I need to have a good conversation about it with someone to help crytalize whats important, or not!

 

 



Andy
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Post #394287
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 7:47 AM


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My thoughts when writing this were that some companies are promoting blogs. Not all of them, but some are. It's a marketing effort to be sure, but it does allow some people to express themselves. For places like Microsoft, it gives them a little more human face.

Not all developers want to write, or speak, or share what they do. But some do and a blog is an easy way to do that. You might want to get into speaking or maybe show off some knowledge without the formal editing that comes with other publication methods. Or you may not want to lead a brown bag session, but you'll write. Or you may not want to do either.

The thing about technical blogging is that you can promote yourself in a way that can be hard to do elsewhere. Publication is a hassle and having someone change/edit your words can be annoying. Some don't care, some do, so as Andy mentioned, this gives you another medium to communicate.

You definitely have to be careful about what you write. You don't want to write things that offend people, but you can explain how you figured something out. And promote yourself as well. To some extent the company takes a chance by allowing you some exposure. You might leave for another job!

I'd say that blogging (personal, professional, or corporate) is worth trying. You might love it. Might hate it. Could be a team building thing. Might be a way to get FAQs out there quickly. Might be a way to show off your own project and even get help. I've seen all of these. Jamie Thomson (http://blogs.conchango.com/jamiethomson/) does a great job of professional blogging as a consultant and we track his stuff in the Database Weekly newsletter. Oren Eini has a project he blogs about (http://ayende.com/Blog/category/486.aspx), though I think he mixes things up with personal stuff too much. Jonathan Schwartz does a great corporate blog (http://blogs.sun.com/jonathan/), but he's the CEO. I think the PSS engineers for SQL Server have a great blog (http://blogs.msdn.com/psssql/).

Just for the record, Andy wrote this Doing the CTRL-A, CTRL-C thing now.







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Post #394298
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 9:02 AM
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Hi Steve - Maybe the editorial should become part of SQLServerCentral.com blog then you don't have to worry about neglecting the blog in favor of the editorial. Just make the editorial a thread on the blog.
Post #394341
Posted Tuesday, August 28, 2007 10:08 AM
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Myself, I've isolated my personal blog/email from my job application process (not that I'm doing that right now). I don't want my employer looking at my blog before I'm hired as I have some strong political opinions that they may or may not agree with, so I bought a vanity domain name and use an email address through there, forwarded to my normal email, for all job applications. My vanity site has my resume and will shortly have a CMS system so that I can post cool stuff that I discover or write in SQL Server.

So let 'em find my personal site, let 'em find my posts here at SQL Server Central. They won't be able to link to my personal blog through there.

Two things drove me to do this. First, getting ridiculous amounts of spam from Monster, Dice, etc. Second, a friend of mine lost out on a tech writing job for a major national radio show because of some content in his blog.

Isolation for me, baby!
Post #394370
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