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SQL Source Control and Git–Getting Started

It seems as though Git is taking the world by storm as the Version Control System (VCS) of choice. TFS is widely used in the MS world, but Git is growing, Subversion is shrinking, as are most of the other platforms.

As a result, I wanted to do a quick setup using SQL Source Control (SOC) and Git, showing you how this works. SOC supports Git in a few ways, so this is the primary way I’d see most people getting started.

Update: Since this was published, the SQL Source Control team released an updated version (v4.1) with support for Git that allows push/pull within the client. I’ve got an updated post here.

Scenario

Here’s the scenario that I’ll use. I’ve got a database, WindowDemo, that has a few tables, some data, and a few procs. As you can see below this isn’t linked to a VCS.

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I want to store my DDL code in c:\git\WindowDemo\trunk. I’ve got that folder created, but it’s empty. I’ll keep related database stuff (docs, scripts, etc) in c:\git\WindowDemo if I need it.

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Git Setup

The first thing you need to do is get your Git repository setup. There are many ways to do this, but I’ll use the command line because I like doing that. The commands in the various client GUIs will be very similar.

I’m going to set the git repository here at c:\windowdemo to keep all my database stuff in one place. To setup the repository, I run a git init in the command prompt. This initializes my repository.

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Now I have a git VCS, I need to get code in there.

SQL Source Control Setup

Now I move to SSMS to link my database to the repository. In SSMS, I right click my database and select “link database to source control”.

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This will open the SOC plugin on the setup tab. I’ve filled in the path to the place in the repository I want the code to go. This is the trunk folder. I’ve also selected Git, using the “Custom” selection on the left and Git in the dropdown.

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Once I click the link button, I’ll get a dialog showing progress and then return to the setup tab.

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Notice the balloon near the top. This lets me know the link is active and I have changes in my database that aren’t in the VCS. There’s a pointer to the “Commit changes” tab, so I’ll click that.

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In the image above, I see I have a number of “new” objects from the perspective of the VCS. I can see the name, and the type of object in the middle. At the bottom, I see the version in my database (highlighted code) on the left and the version in my VCS (blank) on the right.

This is where I commit my changes. I enter a comment at the top and click the “commit” button on the right (not shown). When I do that, I’ll get a clean “commit tab” that shows that my VCS is in sync with my database DDL.

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Inside Git

What’s happened in my VCS? Let’s look in the file system. Here I see my trunk folder.

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SOC has created a structure for my DDL code and included some meta data. If I look in one of these folders, such as Stored Procedures, I see

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This is the .SQL code that matches what’s compiled in my database. SOC stores the current CREATE statement for all my objects so that they can easily be examined.

Inside Git, I see a clean status with all my files as committed objects.

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This is what I want. Now I can continue on with database development, tracking all my changes. I’ll look at the flow and tracking changes in another post.


Filed under: Blog Tagged: Git, Redgate, SQL Source Control, syndicated, version control

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Steve Jones is the editor of SQLServerCentral.com and visits a wide variety of data related topics in his daily editorial. Steve has spent years working as a DBA and general purpose Windows administrator, primarily working with SQL Server since it was ported from Sybase in 1990. You can follow Steve on Twitter at twitter.com/way0utwest

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