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The Voice of the DBA

Steve Jones is the editor of SQLServerCentral.com and visits a wide variety of data related topics in his daily editorial. Steve has spent years working as a DBA and general purpose Windows administrator, primarily working with SQL Server since it was ported from Sybase in 1990. You can follow Steve on Twitter at twitter.com/way0utwest

Quick Tips – SQL Prompt Stop the Yelling

I love SQL Prompt, and think it’s a great productivity tool. Even before I worked at Red Gate, I love the tool and had a copy before Red Gate bought the technology from the original developer. Recently I’ve run into a few people that weren’t aware of some of the ways in which it can help you. This is a quick look at one of the ways I use SQL Prompt.

Lower Case Keywords

One of the things that many developers like is lower case keywords. If you examine some C# code, you’ll often find that they have keywords in lower case. For example, here’s a sample from MSDN.

// versioning.cs
// CS0114 expected
public class MyBase 
{
   public virtual string Meth1() 
   {
      return "MyBase-Meth1";
   }
   public virtual string Meth2() 
   {
      return "MyBase-Meth2";
   }
   public virtual string Meth3() 
   {
      return "MyBase-Meth3";
   }
}

When I’ve gotten projects from Red Gate, I see something similar.

However, if I enter some code in Management Studio, by default, SQL Prompt will format it like this:

prompt_aa

Notice the upper case keywords. Personally I like these, but many developers may not. Fortunately there’s an easy fix. Access the SQL Prompt menu in Management Studio and select options (circled below).

prompt_ab

This will bring up the options dialog. Select the CASE item as shown below.

prompt_ac

On the upper right side, you’ll notice that you have drop downs for keywords, built-in functions and data types. By default these are all set to uppercase. However you have a number of choices.

prompt_ad

I’ll change mine to lowercase, click OK, and then reformat my code. I now see this.

prompt_ae

Quick and easy, and I can now read code that looks more like what developers are used to. Maybe I’ll leave things set like this…


Filed under: Blog Tagged: QuickTips, Red Gate, SQL Prompt, syndicated

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