http://www.sqlservercentral.com/blogs/steve_jones/2010/11/16/another-plagiarizer/

Printed 2014/08/20 06:42AM

Another Plagiarizer

By Steve Jones, 2010/11/16

I received a note today about someone else that is plagiarizing content from SQLServerCentral. It’s a blog on Windows Live Spaces by ?? in Peking. I won’t link it here, since it’s not important.

There are any number of articles copied, with no attribution listed whatsoever. This person is from Peking, and lists their occupation as SE, which I am guessing is software engineer.

I did try to contact them, as I usually do, but their privacy settings prevented me. So I sent a copyright violation to MSN.

I read Brent Ozar’s post yesterday on plagiarism, and I somewhat agree, somewhat not. On one hand I get that cultures view this stuff differently, and laws are viewed/enforced differently. However leaving aside all the legal stuff, what about this:

Do you ever feel that it’s moral for you to take credit for someone else’s work?

I can’t imagine any culture supporting this. Does anyone want to tell their kids they can copy someone else’s work so they don’t have to learn in school? If your neighbor’s kid cut someone’s grass or performed a chore, would you send your kid out to the person’s house to get paid and take credit for the work?

I don’t think most people would. But that’s what they’re doing when there’s no attribution or credit. I get that you might want to “share” information, but why not link back to the first site? At the very least it would raise both your search engine ratings and spread the information further.

Why else would you blog? To get a job? That’s immoral. You’re implying you know how to a) do the task and b) communicate well. At least one of which you haven’t done, and you’re deceiving the person reading it.

Make money from Google ads? Again, you’re implying you deserve the results from work you didn’t create.

There’s no good excuse for re-posting someone else’s work and saying that you deserve credit for it. At least Cook’s Source gave people credit, and just violated copyright law.


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