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The Voice of the DBA

Steve Jones is the editor of SQLServerCentral.com and visits a wide variety of data related topics in his daily editorial. Steve has spent years working as a DBA and general purpose Windows administrator, primarily working with SQL Server since it was ported from Sybase in 1990. You can follow Steve on Twitter at twitter.com/way0utwest

Tweet Your Job Away

A great example of how to “Tweet” poorly. This guy got fired before he started work.

Twitter is a series of hallway conversations. I think that’s a great description, and I’ll write more about that at some point. However just like those hallways, you need to be aware that you don’t necessarily know who’s listening. Putting it in writing means it could be overheard by anyone, and send on.

In case you’re interested, here’s the tweet that got him fired.

twitter_fired_2

Comments

Posted by Jerry Hung on 27 March 2009

I am surprised! He was smart enough to be hired by Cisco, but not smart enough to hide his inner thoughts

Guess he got what he deserved

I am all hush-hush when it comes to jobs for this reason, you never know who's reading/listening

Posted by nwlibrarian on 27 March 2009

Well said Jerry. Although I think Twitter has its purpose it does make an excellent vehicle for the saying, "It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt." I feel the more one keeps talking the bigger hole they dig for themselves. (Okay, I'll stop talking now.)

Posted by Steve Jones on 27 March 2009

Twitter is different than being in a large public area, like a bar in that it persists longer and hits a wider reach of people. However the rules of how to conduct yourself shouldn't change.

Posted by Brad M. McGehee on 27 March 2009

I think this is just one of many more examples of what we well be seeing in the future with people who regularly Tweet away their personal lives. Many of the conversations I follow would turn me off from hiring many of them.

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