SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 

T-SQL Tuesday #108: New Horizons Beyond SQL Server

There comes a point in one’s career when a change is requisite. Big or small there always seems to be a tipping point that mandates some sort of change. Maybe the change is an entirely new career field. Maybe the change is adapting to the ever improving features of a specific software or product. Maybe, that change means learning a tangential technology.

This is precisely the goal Malathi Mahadevan (b | t) seems to have envisioned for the 108th installment of TSQL Tuesday.

If you are interested in reading the original invite, you can find that here.

So the challenge for this T-SQL Tuesday is – pick one thing you want to learn that is not SQL Server. Write down ways and means to learn it and add it as another skill to your resume. If you are already learning it or know it – explain how you got there and how it has helped you. Your experience may help many others looking for guidance on this.”

Personally, I am not one to settle, so learning and improving are important. New technologies, changes in technologies, new features, tangential technologies – they are ways to continue to learn and improve – most of the time. Sometimes, a new technology offers a good change of pace and offers an exit from something that is becoming too standard, while providing an entrance to something different, difficult, exciting and expanding.

Through the year (2018), I created a few goals for myself around some of these new or different technologies:

  1. Become proficient at MySQL (maybe even certify who knows)
  2. Become proficient at PowerShell
  3. Work towards the TCM (I got to busy with 1 and 2 to even accord any time towards this one)

Proficient is sort of a vague term because it can have a different meaning to different people. For me, I will describe what I have been doing to become proficient in both PoSh and MySQL.

PowerShell

A shout out is absolutely necessary for Adam Machanic (twitter) for picking the right blog meme that has been able to survive so long in the SQLFamily. This party has helped many people figure out fresh topics as well as enabled them to continue to learn.

I have dabbled in PowerShell over the years – just enough to “be dangerous” as some may say. I wouldn’t call it proficient and probably not even dangerous really. I was able to muddle my way through being able to create some basic scripts to perform certain tasks.

This rudimentary ability just isn’t enough to be able to put the skill on a resume (imho). It certainly wasn’t enough skill to be able to manage a large group of servers and perform various enterprise type tasks. My objective was to be able to create a set of tools for myself that I could use and have repeatable success at great ease.

I sat down with my first set of various tasks I wanted to be able to perform and worked on them as I set time aside to learn PoSh better – every day. It took several weeks and by no means am I on the same level as Rob Sewell (b | t) or Chrissy LeMaire (b | t) or Sean McCown (b | t). That said, I do feel I am far more capable in PoSh now than I was last year.

This is a skill that I plan to continue to hone. I am learning every time I pick it up and try to do something different. It is good that I am able to keep learning. Next year, I plan on being able to say I am more proficient than I am now. I am also hopeful to be able to be good enough to properly contribute to the dbaChecks project. I do also hope to share some of the scripts I have created on my blog as well.

Here are some of my first dabbles with powershell that I have integrated into other blog posts. Yes, they are very rudimentary.

MySQL

Learning MySQL is probably not too big of a stretch to be honest. I certainly think it is far more similar to SQL Server in many regards than PoSh. After all, it is just another little DBMS and does happen to be rather popular.

I wanted to pick up MySQL so I could support clients that have it installed here there and everywhere in their environments. Many clients have more than one DBMS platform and it is good to understand and be able to administer multiple platforms with a high level of competence. Unfortunately, MySQL comes with a fair amount of gotchas. There are serious limitations depending on version and flavor. Some clients may be stuck on a rather old version of MariaDB (akin to SQL 2000). This means developing a broad set of scripts and skills quickly and on the fly.

I have a ways to go in my learning due to the varied flavors of MySQL but I am getting there. I do feel pretty comfortable hopping in and troubleshooting performance issues and doing a quick health assessment at this point. I would call that proficient. Similar to what I said about PoSh, I plan on being able to say next year that I am more proficient. More opportunity with this platform is what lends itself to better proficiency.

TSQL2sDay150x150The Wrap

I believe in continuous integration / improvement when it comes to personal growth and development. It is necessary to keep your personal skills sharp as well as keep yourself marketable.

Oh, and if you are interested in some of my community contributions (which according to Jens Vestargaard is an awesome contribution), read this series I have published.

Comments

Leave a comment on the original post [jasonbrimhall.info, opens in a new window]

Loading comments...