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The Scary DBA

I have twenty+ years experience in IT. That time was spent in technical support, development and database administration. I work forRed Gate Software as a Product Evangelist. I write articles for publication at SQL Server Central, Simple-Talk, PASS Book Reviews and SQL Server Standard. I have published two books, ”Understanding SQL Server Execution Plans” and “SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled.” I’m one of the founding officers of the Southern New England SQL Server Users Group and its current president. I also work on part-time, short-term, off-site consulting contracts. In 2009 and 2010 I was awarded as a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. In the past I’ve been called rough, intimidating and scary. To which I usually reply, “Good.” You can contact me through grant -at- scarydba dot kom (unobfuscate as necessary).

nHibernate Database, First Look


I’m getting my first look at a full-fledged nHibernate database developed by consultants for our company. I thought I’d share my initial impressions. I’ll be capturing trace events from the database over the next couple of weeks, so I’ll be following up on the behavior of nHibernate within this database as well.

The first thing I saw & thought was, “Foreign key constraints. Thank the gods.” That really is good news. I was frankly concerned that they might go with the “let the code handle it” approach. There are quite a few null columns. I’m also seeing tons & tons of nvarchar(255) which must the default string size. Lots of bit fields too. They also used bigint in a lot of places too. None of this is definitively good or bad, just observations.

There are tables that lack a primary key. That raises a bit of a concern. The primary keys I’ve looked at have all been clustered, which isn’t too problematic since that’s probably the primary access path. There are a few unique constraints on some of the tables too.

Overall though, I don’t see anything that, at first glance, makes me want to run screaming from the room (or pick up a big stick & start looking for developers).  The devil is no doubt in the details. Time to get started looking at the trace events.

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