http://www.sqlservercentral.com/blogs/scarydba/2009/12/01/how-do-_2D00_you_2D00_-use-sql-server/

Printed 2014/10/20 05:37AM

How do -You- use SQL Server

By Grant Fritchey, 2009/12/01


I’ve been tagged by a misplaced yankee, uh, New Englander, whatever. The question is, how do I/we use SQL Server where I work. That’s a tough one. It would make a much shorter, and easier,¬†blog post to describe the things we don’t use it for. However, keeping with the spirit of these tags, I’ll try to lay out it.

For those that don’t know, I work for a rather large insurance company. This means that we have lots and lots of databases, but not much data. We also are cheap. That means we’ll run an app into the ground rather than spend the money & time to replace it. We have apps still running from the 70’s and 80’s propped up by ancient men with pocket protectors, spit, bailing wire and happy thoughts. This also means that we have apps running on SQL Server 7, 2000, 2005 and 2008. Give me a couple of weeks and I’m sure I can get an R2 app deployed. There is also a few Oracle databases, our warehouse and Peoplesoft in particular. We even have a DB2 and, I think, one Sybase database somewhere.

I don’t want to go into lots of details about the type of data we store, lest I get in trouble, but basically, think insurance and you’ll get a pretty good idea of a lot of it. Add in the fact that my company prides itself on engineering to avoid risk and you’ll know that we gather quite a bit of information about the things that we insure. There are lots and lots of very small databases. Our largest db’s are just breaking 100gb, but must are in the 20-60gb range. We have a ton of OLTP systems gathering all the different data. These have been developed in just about every possible way. We even have a couple of systems using¬†nHibernate under development. We move, mostly, pretty standard structured data. We have a few processes that are using XML, mostly from third party sources, to import data, so we’ve learned how to shred that stuff into the database. Spatial data, insurance remember, is the big new thing on the block. We’re seeing lots more implementations taking advantage of this. We don’t see much in the way of unstructured data, but some of the reports from the engineers falls into this realm. We also get quite a few photo’s from them that want us to store. We’re working on using FileStream to keep those in sync with the db rather than storing them within the database itself.

Currently, and I hate this, the overwhelming majority of our OLTP data is collected in SQL Server. All our datamarts used for reporting are in SQL Server. BUT, in the middle sits our Oracle warehouse. So we have to convert our data from SQL Server into Oracle and then back into SQL Server. It’s fun. Swapping data types over & over, shrinking column names only to re-expand them into something a human being can read… It’s lots of fun.

We use SSIS for almost all our ETL processes, although we have a few DTS packages still chugging away on some of the 2000 servers. We’re running a bit of replication, but nothing major. We have several fail-over clusters in production. We’re running virtual machines in lots of places. We’re expanding our Reporting Services implementation pretty rapidly. After attending Buck Woody’s sessions at PASS this year we’re getting Central Management Servers and Policy Based Management implemented.

Most of my time is spent working with development teams. We do most our deployment work using Visual Studio. I do database design, stored procedure writing and tuning, data access methods… you name it and I’m involved with it. The level of our involvement varies from team to team, but by & large, we get involved early in most development projects and are able to influence how databases are developed.

For monitoring we’re using Microsoft System Center Operations Manager (or whatever it’s called this week). We’ve modified it somewhat, adding special rules & monitors to keep an eye on the system better. We also use Idera’s SQL Diagnostic Manager to help keep a more detailed eye on the systems. I already mentioned that we use Visual Studio for most of our development & deployments. We also use several Red Gate products, Compare, Data Compare, Prompt, pretty much every day.

That’s pretty much it. We keep busy and keep the systems up, running & happy most of the time.

Because I think they’ll have interesting answers, I’m going to pass this on to Jeremiah Peschka and Tim Ford.


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