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SQL Server 2008 - Top Reasons to Upgrade.....

OK, you've seen many of these before, but if you haven't figured out its TIME to upgrade your SQL Servers to 2008, here are 7 more reasons, brought to you by TechTarget, Dell & Intel, as part of their SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Series.  Some are obvious, others not - but if you are on SQL Server 2000, make the move as soon as possible - support is already phased out.  If you're on SQL Server 2005, then, well, there are no excuses - the transition is pretty seemless. 

There is much for the DBA and BI professional alike.  My personal favorite reasons for upgrading are the new exciting features in SQL Server 2008, such as Data and Backup Compression (- see my earlier blog on this topic: Decompressing on Compression in SQL Server 2008....), Change Data Capture (CDC), Auditing, Policy Management, Data Collector and Management Data Warehouse, Spatial Data, and more...

For a full list of features and detailed descriptions, see SQL Server Books Online and the SQL Server 2008 Overview Web site.

So, back to the article at hand.  I wanted to share and disseminate the information, which is focused on the small-medium businesses, and talks about business strategies with respect to upgrading to 2008. 

Among their seven business reasons for upgrading to SQL Server 2008 are:

  1. YOUR BUSINESS WILL BE MORE INTELLIGENT
  2. YOUR MISSION-CRITICAL DATA CAN BE BETTER PROTECTED
  3. YOUR ENTIRE BUSINESS WILL PERFORM MORE EFFICIENTLY
  4. YOUR DATABASE WILL BE MANAGED CENTRALLY
  5. IT’S GOOD TO BE CURRENT
  6. IF YOU STILL HAVE SQL SERVER 2000, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?
  7. IF YOU HAVE SQL SERVER 2005, WHY WAIT AT ALL?

It isn't always easy to know when to upgrade to the latest hardware or software release. This white paper explores the benefits of moving to SQL Server 2008, including improved performance and management capabilities. Gain insight into how to simplify this transition, and the top seven reasons organizations are making the shift. Learn how this upgrade can enable your organization to improve its efficiency, data security and business continuity.   Learn more of the benefits of this upgrade here.

Hope you enjoy!

Comments

Posted by Hugo Shebbeare, SQL Server MVP on 21 January 2010

Thanks for the great post Robert!

For those running SQL Server 2000, Mainstream support already ended as of April last year (extended still available) - source:

blogs.msdn.com/.../end-of-mainstream-support-for-sql-server-2005-sp1-and-sql-server-2000-sp4.aspx

Posted by Dugi on 21 January 2010

hmm nice reasons they are top 7 here, not top 10, not bad!

Posted by Jason Brimhall on 21 January 2010

One more reason - you will have more reason to gain more intelligence.

Nice list

Posted by Carl Walden on 22 January 2010

There are more reasons than just the mentioned 7 you might not believed me but I am doing a consulting job at this present time and there are SQL Server 6 and 6.5 still running by this client. As far as migration is concern one should always consider the back-end application because some of the company who wrote the application on such versions have disappeared or gone bust. The client need alternative before any final migration could take place if not the entire business will fall part. Based on that there are also lack of skill-sets to support such old version etc therefore so many factors need to be considered before migrating to any new versions and from my experience there are a lot more reasons than the mentioned 7 but is better than none all the same well-done.

Posted by Robert Pearl on 22 January 2010

Absolutely, Carl - there are definately more than 7, and is why I wrote "here are 7 more" than the other several ones out there.  These reasons were brought by the sponsor, and so I shared it with all of us.

And coming from your point of view, SQL Server 6/6.5, the list of reasons to upgrade would fill a book ;-).  Thanks!

Posted by David Pendleton on 16 February 2010

Where do I rate this article a zero?

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