SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 

SQL Puzzle 4: The Beale Papers

I’ve not done a SQL puzzle for a while so thought it was getting overdue…

I set this one for my workmates a while ago and people found it quite fun.

The Beale Papers are a set of three ciphertexts which allegedly reveal the details of a buried treasure. The tale is that the treasure was buried by Thomas J. Beale in Bedford County, Virginia, USA back in the 1820s. He entrusted a box containing the ciphered messages to the care of a local innkeeper and then disappeared never to be seen again – his intent was that the papers could be passed on to his descendants and they could decode the messages and claim their rightful inheritance. The innkeeper passed the ciphertexts on to a friend before he died, and said friend spent the rest of his life trying to decipher them. He succeeded on the second message but failed on the others.

Treasure.png

Since the 19th century many attempts have been made to decipher the other messages and find the treasure. Even without cracking the code, treasure hunters have got out their shovels over the years to dig up parts of Bedford County without finding anything (as far as we know). Recently there are some claims to have solved the puzzle, but that the treasure was already gone.Of course there’s a good chance the whole thing is a hoax!

Your task is to repeat the deciphering of the second message, but to make it easier I’ll tell you the key.

Beale used an existing text as a key for the cipher in which he assigned a number to each word, 1 for the first word, two for the second and so on.

Then for each letter in the text he wanted to encode he randomly picked a word in the key that started with that letter, and then he enciphered the letter as the number for that word. Make sense?

For instance, if the key text was “now is the time” and the plain text is “tin”, then either (3 2 1) or (4 2 1) are valid encipherments.

The key text Beale used for encoding the second message was the United States declaration of independence. I’m going to leave you to source your own copy of this. Be aware that some of the real world issues with this task that you may come up include the fact that Beale may have made some inaccuracies in his ciphering, and the copy of the key text he used to code his text is unlikely to be exactly the same as the one you use. As such you may need to do some tweaking, spelling correction and perhaps logic to work out what some of the words are. Good luck if you choose to attempt this!

So, starting with the two variables below, write some SQL to decode the message (@CipherText ):

DECLARE @KeyText VARCHAR(MAX); 
DECLARE @CipherText VARCHAR(MAX);

SET @KeyText = '<Insert your copy of the declaration of independence here>';

SET @CipherText = '115, 73, 24, 807, 37, 52, 49, 17, 31, 62, 647, 22, 7, 15, 140, 47, 29, 107, 79, 84, 56, 239, 10, 26, 811, 5, 196, 308, 85, 52, 160, 136, 59, 211, 36, 9, 46, 316, 554, 122, 106, 95, 53, 58, 2, 42, 7, 35, 122, 53, 31, 82, 77, 250, 196, 56, 96, 118, 71, 140, 287, 28, 353, 37, 1005, 65, 147, 807, 24, 3, 8, 12, 47, 43, 59, 807, 45, 316, 101, 41, 78, 154, 1005, 122, 138, 191, 16, 77, 49, 102, 57, 72, 34, 73, 85, 35, 371, 59, 196, 81, 92, 191, 106, 273, 60, 394, 620, 270, 220, 106, 388, 287, 63, 3, 6, 191, 122, 43, 234, 400, 106, 290, 314, 47, 48, 81, 96, 26, 115, 92, 158, 191, 110, 77, 85, 197, 46, 10, 113, 140, 353, 48, 120, 106, 2, 607, 61, 420, 811, 29, 125, 14, 20, 37, 105, 28, 248, 16, 159, 7, 35, 19, 301, 125, 110, 486, 287, 98, 117, 511, 62, 51, 220, 37, 113, 140, 807, 138, 540, 8, 44, 287, 388, 117, 18, 79, 344, 34, 20, 59, 511, 548, 107, 603, 220, 7, 66, 154, 41, 20, 50, 6, 575, 122, 154, 248, 110, 61, 52, 33, 30, 5, 38, 8, 14, 84, 57, 540, 217, 115, 71, 29, 84, 63, 43, 131, 29, 138, 47, 73, 239, 540, 52, 53, 79, 118, 51, 44, 63, 196, 12, 239, 112, 3, 49, 79, 353, 105, 56, 371, 557, 211, 505, 125, 360, 133, 143, 101, 15, 284, 540, 252, 14, 205, 140, 344, 26, 811, 138, 115, 48, 73, 34, 205, 316, 607, 63, 220, 7, 52, 150, 44, 52, 16, 40, 37, 158, 807, 37, 121, 12, 95, 10, 15, 35, 12, 131, 62, 115, 102, 807, 49, 53, 135, 138, 30, 31, 62, 67, 41, 85, 63, 10, 106, 807, 138, 8, 113, 20, 32, 33, 37, 353, 287, 140, 47, 85, 50, 37, 49, 47, 64, 6, 7, 71, 33, 4, 43, 47, 63, 1, 27, 600, 208, 230, 15, 191, 246, 85, 94, 511, 2, 270, 20, 39, 7, 33, 44, 22, 40, 7, 10, 3, 811, 106, 44, 486, 230, 353, 211, 200, 31, 10, 38, 140, 297, 61, 603, 320, 302, 666, 287, 2, 44, 33, 32, 511, 548, 10, 6, 250, 557, 246, 53, 37, 52, 83, 47, 320, 38, 33, 807, 7, 44, 30, 31, 250, 10, 15, 35, 106, 160, 113, 31, 102, 406, 230, 540, 320, 29, 66, 33, 101, 807, 138, 301, 316, 353, 320, 220, 37, 52, 28, 540, 320, 33, 8, 48, 107, 50, 811, 7, 2, 113, 73, 16, 125, 11, 110, 67, 102, 807, 33, 59, 81, 158, 38, 43, 581, 138, 19, 85, 400, 38, 43, 77, 14, 27, 8, 47, 138, 63, 140, 44, 35, 22, 177, 106, 250, 314, 217, 2, 10, 7, 1005, 4, 20, 25, 44, 48, 7, 26, 46, 110, 230, 807, 191, 34, 112, 147, 44, 110, 121, 125, 96, 41, 51, 50, 140, 56, 47, 152, 540, 63, 807, 28, 42, 250, 138, 582, 98, 643, 32, 107, 140, 112, 26, 85, 138, 540, 53, 20, 125, 371, 38, 36, 10, 52, 118, 136, 102, 420, 150, 112, 71, 14, 20, 7, 24, 18, 12, 807, 37, 67, 110, 62, 33, 21, 95, 220, 511, 102, 811, 30, 83, 84, 305, 620, 15, 2, 10, 8, 220, 106, 353, 105, 106, 60, 275, 72, 8, 50, 205, 185, 112, 125, 540, 65, 106, 807, 138, 96, 110, 16, 73, 33, 807, 150, 409, 400, 50, 154, 285, 96, 106, 316, 270, 205, 101, 811, 400, 8, 44, 37, 52, 40, 241, 34, 205, 38, 16, 46, 47, 85, 24, 44, 15, 64, 73, 138, 807, 85, 78, 110, 33, 420, 505, 53, 37, 38, 22, 31, 10, 110, 106, 101, 140, 15, 38, 3, 5, 44, 7, 98, 287, 135, 150, 96, 33, 84, 125, 807, 191, 96, 511, 118, 40, 370, 643, 466, 106, 41, 107, 603, 220, 275, 30, 150, 105, 49, 53, 287, 250, 208, 134, 7, 53, 12, 47, 85, 63, 138, 110, 21, 112, 140, 485, 486, 505, 14, 73, 84, 575, 1005, 150, 200, 16, 42, 5, 4, 25, 42, 8, 16, 811, 125, 160, 32, 205, 603, 807, 81, 96, 405, 41, 600, 136, 14, 20, 28, 26, 353, 302, 246, 8, 131, 160, 140, 84, 440, 42, 16, 811, 40, 67, 101, 102, 194, 138, 205, 51, 63, 241, 540, 122, 8, 10, 63, 140, 47, 48, 140, 288';

 

I’ll finish this post with an excerpt from the comments on a blog I found where someone claims to have decoded the other two texts as well, and know where the treasure is:
TreasureFound

Have fun!

Previous puzzles on this blog:
SQL Puzzle 1: Magic Squares
SQL Puzzle 2: Eight QueensSQL Puzzle 3: Knights and Queens

Credit to Programming Praxis where I first saw a version of this puzzle – and where you can find many more!


Matthew McGiffen DBA

I started my career in IT as a developer with Visual Basic, C# and ASP working with SQL Server backends. For the last ten years though I’ve focused on the SQL Server side of things. Currently I’m working for a leading software vendor for the financial industry as a DBA, doing a mixture of development and data architecture. If I have a speciality it is in making things run faster.

Comments

Leave a comment on the original post [matthewmcgiffen.com, opens in a new window]

Loading comments...