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Azure Data Architecture Guide (ADAG)

The Azure Data Architecture Guide has just been released!  Check it out: http://aka.ms/ADAG

Think of it as a menu or syllabus for data professionals.  What service should you use, why, and when would you use it.  I had a small involvement in its creation, but there were a large number of people within Microsoft and from 3rd parties that put it together over many months.  Hopefully you find this clears up some of the confusion caused by so many technologies and products.

“This guide presents a structured approach for designing data-centric solutions on Microsoft Azure.  It is based on proven practices derived from customer engagements.”

You can even download a PDF version (106 pages!).

The guide is structured around a basic pivot: The distinction between relational data and non-relational data:

Within each of these two main categories, the Data Architecture Guide contains the following sections:

  • Concepts. Overview articles that introduce the main concepts you need to understand when working with this type of data.
  • Scenarios. A representative set of data scenarios, including a discussion of the relevant Azure services and the appropriate architecture for the scenario.
  • Technology choices. Detailed comparisons of various data technologies available on Azure, including open source options.  Within each category, we describe the key selection criteria and a capability matrix, to help you choose the right technology for your scenario.

The table of contents looks like this:

Traditional RDBMS

Concepts

Scenarios

Big data and NoSQL

Concepts

Scenarios

Cross-cutting concerns

James Serra's Blog

James is a big data and data warehousing technology specialist at Microsoft. He is a thought leader in the use and application of Big Data technologies, including MPP solutions involving hybrid technologies of relational data, Hadoop, and private and public cloud. Previously he was an independent consultant working as a Data Warehouse/Business Intelligence architect and developer. He is a prior SQL Server MVP with over 30 years of IT experience. James is a popular blogger (JamesSerra.com) and speaker, having presented at dozens of PASS events including the PASS Business Analytics conference and the PASS Summit. He is the author of the book “Reporting with Microsoft SQL Server 2012”. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

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