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Everyday SQL

Patrick Keisler is a MCTS and MCP. For over 12 years, he has been been a database administrator for a major investment bank, Wells Fargo Securities. During that time, he has gained considerable knowledge in Microsoft SQL Server by supporting hundreds of applications ranging from high-volume trading applications to massive data warehouses.

Archives: January 2013

How to Remove (Undo) Table Partitioning

I have seen plenty of articles and blog posts out there for how to setup and implement table partitioning, but very few for removing or undoing it.  So I thought I would cover a few ways to accomplish this while still preserving the data.

There could be many reasons for…

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3 comments, 1,816 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 29 January 2013

sp_PerformanceCounters - Get a Health Check of SQL Server's Performance

During your career as a DBA, you'll run across articles by SQL experts or other DBAs that just give you an idea.  A few years ago I found an article, or a poster to be more precise, that explains SQL Server performance counters.  It was written by Kevin Kline, Brent…

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3 comments, 552 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 22 January 2013

Exam 70-432 - SQL Server 2008 Implementation and Maintenance

For years, actually more like a decade, I've been saying that I'm going to get certified in SQL Server.  Well finally after years of saying it, I finally did.  I passed my first exam, 70-432, this past week.  I have to say it was easier and at the same time…

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0 comments, 399 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 15 January 2013

SQL Server has encountered % occurence(s) of cachestore flush for the % cachestore (part of plan cache) due to some database maintenance or reconfigure operations

Have you seen this type of an informational message in your SQL errorlog before?  If so, then I hope the timestamp associated with it was not during the middle of your peak processing time.  This is a good indication that someone has been tinkering with some of the SQL configuration…

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0 comments, 295 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 7 January 2013