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Everyday SQL

Patrick Keisler is a Premier Field Engineer for Microsoft with over 15 years of SQL Server experience working in various fields such as financial, healthcare, and government. He currently holds two MCITP certifications in SQL Server 2008. You can follow him on Twitter or listen to him speak at various SQL Saturdays and user group meetings.

Archives: January 2013

How to Remove (Undo) Table Partitioning

I have seen plenty of articles and blog posts out there for how to setup and implement table partitioning, but very few for removing or undoing it.  So I thought I would cover a few ways to accomplish this while still preserving the data.

There could be many reasons for…

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3 comments, 1,998 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 29 January 2013

sp_PerformanceCounters - Get a Health Check of SQL Server's Performance

During your career as a DBA, you'll run across articles by SQL experts or other DBAs that just give you an idea.  A few years ago I found an article, or a poster to be more precise, that explains SQL Server performance counters.  It was written by Kevin Kline, Brent…

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3 comments, 612 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 22 January 2013

Exam 70-432 - SQL Server 2008 Implementation and Maintenance

For years, actually more like a decade, I've been saying that I'm going to get certified in SQL Server.  Well finally after years of saying it, I finally did.  I passed my first exam, 70-432, this past week.  I have to say it was easier and at the same time…

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0 comments, 428 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 15 January 2013

SQL Server has encountered % occurence(s) of cachestore flush for the % cachestore (part of plan cache) due to some database maintenance or reconfigure operations

Have you seen this type of an informational message in your SQL errorlog before?  If so, then I hope the timestamp associated with it was not during the middle of your peak processing time.  This is a good indication that someone has been tinkering with some of the SQL configuration…

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0 comments, 344 reads

Posted in Everyday SQL on 7 January 2013