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Devin Knight

Devin is a BI consultant at Pragmatic Works Consulting. Previously, he has tech edited the book Professional Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Integration Services and was an author in the book Knight's 24-Hour Trainer: Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Integration Services. Devin has spoken at past conferences like PASS and at several SQL Saturday events. He is a contributing member to the Business Intelligence Special Interest Group (SIG) for PASS as a leader in the SSIS Focus Group. Making his home in Jacksonville, FL, Devin is a participating member of the local users’ group (JSSUG).

SQL Server 2011 (Denali) no DTS support

The end has come!  We've been told for several years the vNext of SQL Server will no longer support DTS and it appear that that time has come.  Taking a look at the CTP of SQL Server Denali one of the first things I noticed is that you no longer see Data Transformation Services under the legacy section of the Database Engine.

So it appears that your hand may be forced to convert! 

I'll make this note too.  When you connect to an older version of SQL Server (2008 R2 in my case) inside Denali then it still does not show the DTS section.

 

Comments

Posted by Dukagjin Maloku on 11 November 2010

Thanks for the info!

Posted by Steve Jones on 11 November 2010

Good to know, as much as I like DTS, it's time to move on and get people to embrace the SSIS paradigm.

Posted by Jason Brimhall on 11 November 2010

That is both good and bad for me.  I inherited hundreds of packages that I am converting to SSIS still.  I prefer SSIS over DTS and like that DTS will be dead.  It just hastens the need to finish the conversion (maybe).

Posted by Brian Knight on 11 November 2010

Thank goodness. I'm tired of supporting it.

Chcek out DTS xChange for converting those DTS packages to Denali or 2005/2008. www.pragmaticworks.com/.../Default.aspx

Posted by peter.row on 12 November 2010

"as much as I like DTS"

You've go to be kidding right?

My experience of DTS was nothing but pain and suffering for doing anything other than 1 off bits. Doing anything more and all you got was things like enterprise manager crashing and pig to debug.

SSIS whilst being more complex still has a lot of the same issues as DTS in terms of having a package that is used as part of say a desktop application. i.e. how to run a package from stored procedure without requiring proxy users, extra permissions; packages are still global to the server as opposed to being local to a particular (applications) database.

I may be wrong on some of those points but last time I looked at it all the things that were a problem in my scenario were still a problem in SSIS you just gained flexibility in what you could do and debug.

Posted by trayalacheruvu on 12 November 2010

Thanks alot for thr information..

Posted by Jamie Thomson on 12 November 2010

VB Script FTW!!!

(joking)

Posted by sridharnalluri on 12 November 2010

Ohhh... DTS no more comes with SQL Server 2011...

Posted by Tim Walker on 12 November 2010

Perhaps that will give Microsoft enough time to fully support SSIS on a 64 bit platform?

Posted by knight_devin@hotmail.com on 12 November 2010

Agreed Tim.  I'm tired of running packages in 32 bit mode on a 64 bit machine.

Posted by chetanr.jain on 12 November 2010

Great Info.. Thanks..

Any idea.. when sql 2011 will be out

Posted by John Scarborough on 12 November 2010

Missing from the CTP is NO guarantee that it will be gone.  Though it may indeed be, it's not a safe assumption.

Posted by knight_devin@hotmail.com on 12 November 2010

Good point John.  I did find this before posting.  Should have included it.  http://tinyurl.com/26e6ptr

Posted by hemakumar_p on 12 November 2010

Nice to hear no more DTS in 2011

Posted by SQL Noob on 12 November 2010

good riddance, those stupid lines everywhere and it was almost impossible to follow the package logic on complex DTS packages

Posted by fantasmitta on 12 November 2010

In my version of SQL Server 2008 (10.0.1600) in Spanish is included DTS.

Posted by Kenneth Wymore on 12 November 2010

YAY! It's about time! Thank you for bringing this to everyone's attention. I have some friends I need to contact now who will be happy to hear this.

Posted by lebacon on 12 November 2010

Someone will build a rearward compatibility package for DTS as an add-on somewhere around SP-1/2.

Posted by rimonh on 14 November 2010

peter.row: One example for something that take minute in DTS and 5 times longer on SSIS: take a table from IBM AS/400 (I belive it will be the same with any dot net connection but didn't try) and put the data on SQL server. Sound easy but SSIS give all string the type nvarchar instead od varchar (as DTS did) so you need to define a data coversion for each column:(.

I have AS400 table with 150 columns...

It's kind of stupid because if you do the same from link server:

select *

into NewTable

from openquery(as400...)

the string will be varchar.

Posted by sharath.chalamgari on 15 November 2010

Hey Then we can expect More Conversion Work From Vendors

Posted by tmkruse on 15 November 2010

I embraced SSIS in 2005 and never looked back.  

Posted by MG on 19 November 2010

For Step by Step SQL Server Denali installtion check this link

sqlserver-training.com/.../-

SQL Server Denali (2011) CTP 1 Video demonstrates - How to install a new instance of SQL Server Denali.

Posted by hariprasadere on 6 February 2011

IT is good and bad,But We have to move with the technology.

And some times it is very hard to support for older code.

any way I like both DTS and SSIS.Lets folllow the SSIS.

Posted by hasan_shan on 11 February 2011

Very nice info Devin, thanks.

Posted by Joachim Moehrke on 1 June 2012

We have developed an access tool which allows to run DTS packages on SQL Server 2012.

Is anybody interested?

I would like to know if it makes sense to market this solution.

Please, leave me a message at

dts2012@web.de

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