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DataOnWheels

Steve Hughes is a Principal Consultant at Magenic. His area of expertise is in data and business intelligence architecture on the Microsoft SQL Server platform. He was also the data architect for a SaaS company which delivered a transportation management solution for fleets across the United States. Steve has co-authored two books and delivered more than 30 presentations on SQL Server and data architecture over the past six years. He also provides insights from the field on his blog at http://dataonwheels.wordpress.com.

Oracle Tips for MSBI Devs #5: Working with Oracle on Windows Azure

As you have likely noticed in my series, Oracle Tips for MSBI Devs, I have done a lot of work with Oracle through the years while delivering BI solutions. One of the pain points of working with Oracle in development is setting up an Oracle development server. Even though I have installed Oracle a number of times, it is never seems to be an easy process.

So, I decided to try out the Oracle Virtual Machine template in Windows Azure. I will walk through the setup process here. I need to use Oracle as a data source for some SSIS development.

Setting Up the VM

From the Windows Azure portal, select the Virtual Machines tab then “Create a Virtual Machine”. This will open up the variety of options available to create the VM. Select the FROM GALLERY option which will open another dialog.

image

On the next screen, you pick the edition Oracle you want to use for the VM. (NOTE: at the moment, Oracle images are in preview. Microsoft recently that Oracle VMs will be be available on March 12. You can find more information here.)

image

I will be using the Oracle 11g R2 Standard Edition on Windows Server 2008 R2. The next step is to name and pick the size of the VM. The minimum size for this is Small and is what I used. I then completed the setup including setting up the endpoints and creating a new user.

I had originally tried to use Oracle 12c, but significant changes have been made to support multitenancy which make set up considerably more tedious with very few good examples available on the web. Most of the advice given by Oracle pros was to “Read the _____ Manual!” While “sensible”, I just needed a simple dev environment. This is one of the significant advantages of working with SQL Server, community help is abundant and usually pleasant. For instance, Microsoft recently published a document for setting up the Oracle 12c VM. I used it to work through some of the setup instructions below.

Once the initialization was complete I used the connect image button to open an RDP connection to the VM from the Azure dashboard. One thing to keep in mind, be sure to keep track of the user name and password you created. This your admin account and you will need it to log in to the VM. Now you have a running VM. At this point, I went and found the Oracle tools that I typically use and pinned them to the task bar.

Creating and Loading an Oracle Schema

Because I always for get some of these steps, and I really don’t want to read the manual, I listed the steps I used to create a simple set of data for use. This is not good enough for production, but it is a starting point.

Step 1: Create a Listener. This is required before you can create a database. To do this open the Oracle Net Configuration Assistant. From here you can create your first listener. I left the default settings for the setup.

Step 2: Create the database. (This is the equivalent of an instance in SQL Server.)  I used the Database Configuration Assistant for Oracle Database to create my first database on the server. This can be found in the Oracle home directory on the start menu.I chose the General Purpose template for my database. Most of the steps make some sense. I did choose to add the sample schemas as this is the easiest way to verify I can connect and work with the data. After all of this, the database will be created based on your choices.

Step 3: Using SQL*Plus, I connected to the SYSTEM schema. The user-name in this case is “SYSTEM”. Now we

Step 4: Create a new user and schema. (This is similar to the SQL Server database, not a SQL Server Schema.) This will give a location to create tables for loading data in the next steps. In accordance with typical Oracle support you can read about how to do this here: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/statements_8003.htm#i2065278. Or I can give you a good starting script and save you time.

CREATE USER someusername
IDENTIFIED BY <<add password here>>
DEFAULT TABLESPACE example
QUOTA 10M ON example
TEMPORARY TABLESPACE temp
QUOTA 5M ON system;

Your welcome! This will create a database using existing tablespaces. This is NOT a production level script and it is barely good enough for development. But in my case, I am using Oracle as a source and don’t plan to do much development or work on it so it meets my needs. If you need more insight, I guess you will need to read the documentation.

Step 5: Create a table and add rows. I continued to use the SYSTEM login and created a couple of simple tables within my new schema. I then used simple INSERT INTO statements to add data.

Now you have some basic data to work with to test connectivity with SSIS or SSAS.

Making the Oracle Database Accessible

In order to access your Oracle database on the VM you need to enable the port. You do this by going to the Azure portal and selecting the VMs tab. Once there, go to the Endpoints tab. You may recall that when you created the VM, you were asked about the Remote Desktop and PowerShell ports. Here are the steps to create the Endpoint to support Oracle.

  1. Click Add to open the Add Endpoint dialog.
  2. On the first page, leave the default which will add a stand-alone endpoint.
  3. On the second page you need to add a name (I used “Oracle”), select the TCP protocol, and put port 1521 in both the private and public port textboxes.

Once completed you should see the new endpoint in the list of available endpoints as shown below.

image

Connecting SSIS to that Oracle Database

Now that we have data in the db, it is time to create the connection to SSIS and load data and run queries.

The first thing I needed to do was load the client tools. I used the newer Oracle Data Access Components (ODTwithODAC12012). Once that was loaded, I added the following entry to my TNSNames.ora file (look for that in a directly like the following: c:\app\<username>\product\12.1.0\client_1\Network\Admin):

ORACLEDW =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = <servername>.cloudapp.net) (PORT  1521)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVER=DEDICATED)
(SERVICE_NAME = ORACLEDW)
)
)

The key parts to get right are the HOST, PORT, and SERVICE_NAME as highlighted above.

Once TNS was in place, I was able to create an ODP.NET connection to the database and proceed to load the data.

I know that some of this has been simplistic but it is great that I don’t have to install Oracle myself. This functionality makes Azure even more appealing as a hosting solution.


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